The Boxer: Reinhard Kleist in Conversation with Alan Scott Haft

  • Miles Nadal JCC (750 Spadina Avenue)
  • 3 p.m.

At 16, Hertzko Haft found himself imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp and forced into boxing matches with his fellow prisoners for the amusement of SS officers. Eventually able to escape, he moved to the United States and began a career in boxing, even going up against famed fighter Rocky Marciano. Promoting the English translation of his book on the topic, The Boxer, author Reinhard Kleist will be discussing the life and career of Hertzko Haft with his son, Alan Scott Haft.

Details: The Boxer: Reinhard Kleist in Conversation with Alan Scott Haft

Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

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  • Royal Ontario Museum (100 Queens Park)
  • All day

If The Forbidden City: Inside the Court of China’s Emperors has a mascot, it’s Emperor Yongzheng. The image of the 18th-century Chinese ruler dominates the promotional material of the exhibition, which is one of the centrepieces of the Royal Ontario Museum’s centennial year. His portrait certainly has visual appeal, but Yongzheng is also a figure associated with surprising elements of life within the former imperial palace.

Details: A Journey Into the Forbidden City

Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

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  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

“The greatest art always returns you to the vulnerabilities of the human situation.” – Francis Bacon

“In the human figure one can express more completely one’s feelings about the world than in any other way.” – Henry Moore

These quotations, which welcome visitors to Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty,” immediately establish the exhibition’s tone and focus. Each artist’s distortions of the human figure, shaped by their wartime experiences, capture the vulnerability of our mortal forms.

Details: Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

Celebrating Beautiful (and Affordable) Art

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  • Direct Energy Centre (100 Princes' Boulevard)
  • All day

The Love Art fair has arrived in Toronto. A branch of the international Affordable Art Fair, Love Art champions the philosophy that fine-art collecting and economic accessibility should not be mutually exclusive, and aims to create new art collectors while also providing a forum for emerging and established artists to showcase and sell their works. Definitions of affordability and accessibility are certainly subjective, but with prices starting at $60, Love Art is endeavouring to make the acquisition of art possible for a wider range of people.

Details: Celebrating Beautiful (and Affordable) Art

The Last Confession

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 2 p.m.

If you’re in the mood for a murder mystery with a religious twist, you’ll want to check out The Last Confession. David Suchet (Poirot) and Richard O’Callaghan star in this play about the mysterious death of Pope John Paul I in 1978. After only 33 days in office, and having warned three cardinals that they would be replaced, he is found dead. Though the Vatican refuses to open an official investigation, Cardinal Benelli goes out in search of the truth.

Details: The Last Confession

Beatrice & Virgil: Yann Martel’s Monkey and Donkey Hit the Stage

Damien Atkins as Henry, peering at a taxidermied donkey and ape, Beatrice and Virgil. Photo by Joanna Akyol.

Damien Atkins as Henry, peering at a taxidermied donkey and ape, Beatrice and Virgil. Photo by Joanna Akyol.

  • Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street)
  • 2 p.m.

Most unsolicited messages from admirers to famous writers do not result in collaborations: but when Lindsay Cochrane, kindergarten teacher and English literature grad, emailed Yann Martel, the acclaimed author of Life of Pi, about adapting one of his novels into a stage play, the two ended up joining forces. The result is Cochrane’s first play, Beatrice & Virgil, on now at Factory Theatre (in a co-production with Ottawa’s National Arts Centre). With the help of director Sarah Garton Stanley, Cochrane has made an impressively valiant effort to wrangle some large, abstract, and troublesome ideas into a well-crafted work of live theatre.

Details: Beatrice & Virgil: Yann Martel’s Monkey and Donkey Hit the Stage

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  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • 2 p.m.

The Peggy Baker Dance Project is thinking outside the box with its new production, land|body|breath. Specially designed to exist between the paintings and sculptures of the Thomson Collection of Canadian Art at the Art Gallery of Ontario, this immersive show features a combination of dancers and vocalists.

Details: land|body|breath

Vitals: Immersive Theatre That’s Close to Home

Katherine Cullen in Vitals. Photo by Michael Barlas.

Katherine Cullen in Vitals. Photo by Michael Barlas.

  • 149 Roncesvalles Avenue (149 Roncesvalles Avenue)
  • 1:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.

Outside the March seems to be Toronto’s favourite indie theatre company. Director Mitchell Cushman built up quite a buzz after consecutive hits Mr. Marmalade and Terminus, both of which were praised for their unconventional use of space (the former was set in a kindergarten classroom, the latter placed both the actors and the audience on the stage of the Royal Alexandra Theatre), so his next project had been highly anticipated. Vitals, written by Rosamund Small, was the first script for Outside the March developed specifically for a site-specific space, and its original run had to be extended even before opening night. Then, only a few days into the run, it was extended again to June 1. And though Vitals isn’t the best show in Outside the March’s history, there’s a reason that tickets have been flying.

Details: Vitals: Immersive Theatre That’s Close to Home

A God in Need of Help Gets Some From Its Friends

From back to front: Ben Irvine, Daniel Kash, Tony Nappo, Jonathan Seinen, Dmitry Chepovetsky, and Alden Adair. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

From back to front: Ben Irvine, Daniel Kash, Tony Nappo, Jonathan Seinen, Dmitry Chepovetsky, and Alden Adair. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

We’re nearing the end of Tarragon Theatre‘s 2013/2014 season, and it appears we’ve also arrived at the final stage of its theme: love, loss, wine, and the gods. But that doesn’t mean the Tarragon, which has seen some major hits this year in Lungs, The Double, and The Ugly One, is phoning it in. Sean Dixon’s ambitious new script, A God in Need of Help, has produced not only one of the longer plays in the Tarragon season, but also easily the most dense and layered, mixing as it does historical fact and fiction with timeless issues of art, religion, and politics. Fortunately, that makes it the strongest mainstage show of the season thus far (we’ll see how Tarragon’s final show, The God That Comes, co-created by and featuring Hawksley Workman, performs in June).

Details: A God in Need of Help Gets Some From Its Friends