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Extra, Extra: Cherry Blossoms, a Jilly’s Update, and Sex Education Opposition

Every weekday’s end, we collect just about everything you ought to care about or ought not to miss.

culture

Rep Cinema This Week: Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief; 2001: A Space Odyssey, Introduced by Alfonso Cuarón; and Selma

The best repertory and art-house screenings, special presentations, lectures, and limited engagements in Toronto.

Still from Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief.

At rep cinemas this week: a glib but revealing exposé of Scientology, a screening of Kubrick’s sci-fi classic introduced by cinephile favourite Alfonso Cuarón, and Ava DuVernay’s all-too-current portrait of civil rights activism.

Keep reading: Rep Cinema This Week: Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief; 2001: A Space Odyssey, Introduced by Alfonso Cuarón; and Selma

culture

About a Boy: Lynn Crosbie on Her Kurt Cobain-Inspired “True Story” Where Did You Sleep Last Night

We chat with the Toronto-based poet, critic, and novelist about her dazzling new book and the legacy of Kurt Cobain

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“This is a true story,” we’re told at the start of Where Did You Sleep Last Night, Toronto-based poet and critic Lynn Crosbie’s dizzying new book. It’s an equally buoyant and anguished high-concept love story that imagines Kurt Cobain reincarnated into the body of a young amnesiac named Celine Black. Willed back to life by Evelyn, a devout teenaged fan from Carnation, Washington who lands in rehab after an overdose and finds her beloved icon by her side, Celine resumes Cobain’s interrupted legacy with a new band, a new tortured celebrity persona, and, in Evelyn, a new self-destructive partner by his side. You could think of that opening claim as a dark joke in the vein of the Coen brothers’ attempt to pitch Fargo’s neo-noir as true crime from the American midwest, but Crosbie doesn’t seem to be laughing. At its heart, this is a beautiful and dead-earnest book about the awfully true desire to bring our long-lost loved ones—including the distant ones that hang on our walls as posters—back to life and project them into the future, even if it’s a future as painful as the past they’ve left behind.

Keep reading: About a Boy: Lynn Crosbie on Her Kurt Cobain-Inspired “True Story” Where Did You Sleep Last Night