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The Plan to Get the Capybaras Back, The Tragically Hip Play Toronto, and a “$1 House” Sells Below Asking (Kind of)

Every weekday’s end, we collect just about everything you ought to care about or ought not to miss.

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What You Should Explore at Doors Open 2016

Your guide to some of the best of the 130 buildings taking part in Doors Open this year.

If you’ve ever passed by a Toronto building and felt the urge to learn more, then this weekend is the chance to explore that curiosity.

Many of Toronto’s most well-known buildings–and hidden architectural treasures–will open their doors to the public this weekend for the 17th annual Doors Open Toronto. Doors Open, which takes place all over Ontario throughout the summer and into the fall, gives people a chance to step inside the histories and unique architecture of buildings they may see everyday.

This year, more than 130 buildings will open their doors to allow the public to take a look inside. Tours and special events will also happen at many of the buildings, while others offer a chance to create your own self-guided tour.

For the first time this year Doors Open will have walking tours so people can take in more of what Toronto offers in a structured fashion, rather than being totally left to their own devices. Another first for this is a keynote speech from Karim Rashid, an award-winning architect, on the historic Trading Floor on Friday at 7 p.m.

But what are the right venues for you to check out? Luckily Torontoist is here to break it all down for you.

Keep reading: What You Should Explore at Doors Open 2016

cityscape

We Need Toronto Police to be More Accountable in the Deaths of Black Citizens

If you thought the U.S. was worse off, think again.

Photo by Zun Lee from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Photo by Zun Lee from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

After almost two years since the death of Jermaine Carby, we finally know the name of the police officer who shot and killed him.

At a coroner’s inquest earlier this month into the death of the 33-year-old Brampton man, Constable Ryan Reid of the Peel Police was revealed as the officer who shot Carby. When relating the events that led up to the shooting to the inquest’s all-white jury, Reid said: “I would not do anything differently.”

If that lack of empathy and remorse sounds familiar to you, it’s because it is exactly what George Zimmermann said when he shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin four years ago, in Sanford, Florida.

Keep reading: We Need Toronto Police to be More Accountable in the Deaths of Black Citizens