Long Winter: Year Two, Volume Three

Joel Gibb and his Hidden Cameras are late additions to the Long Winter lineup. Photo by Elsa Quarsell.

Joel Gibb and his Hidden Cameras are late additions to the Long Winter lineup. Photo by Elsa Quarsell.

  • The Great Hall (1087 Queen Street West)
  • 7 p.m.

This winter may already seem long due to the chilly temperatures, but that’s the whole point of the Long Winter series: to get you out of the house and to a warm building packed to the rafters with cool art, music, and more. Long Winter: Year Two, Volume Three has added the Hidden Cameras to the already rammed music lineup, which includes Doug Tielli, Rae Spoon, and Buzz Records labelmates Weaves and Isla Craig. Also taking place is Vish Khanna’s Long Night interview series, Henri Fabergé’s continuing Fountain of Mouth performance art project, the Long Winter Arcade, and much more.

Details: Long Winter: Year Two, Volume Three

A Wake For Lost Time

The Elphants in The Room collective looks well rested here... Photo by Moez Surani.

The Elphants in The Room collective looks well rested here... Photo by Moez Surani.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Theatre Passe Muraille’s Elephants in the Room collective members aren’t just staying up late for this month’s cabaret. They’re turning it into a one-time-only 24-hour performance experiment entitled A Wake For Lost Time that’ll be open for public viewing at the beginning (Friday evening from 7:30 p.m.-10:45 p.m.), midway through (Saturday midday from 11:30 a.m.–1:45 p.m.), and for the final three hours (Saturday afternoon from 3:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.). Combining “performance art, poetry, classical and post-dramatic theatre,” the entire “ritual” will be carried on a 24-hour web stream.

Details: A Wake For Lost Time

Toronto Poetry Slam

Kitchener-based poet Janice Lee headlines this month's Toronto Poetry Slam. Photo by Stefan Chirila.

Kitchener-based poet Janice Lee headlines this month's Toronto Poetry Slam. Photo by Stefan Chirila.

  • Drake Hotel Underground (1150 Queen Street West)
  • 8 p.m.

The Toronto Poetry Project kicks off 2014 with the first Toronto Poetry Slam of the year, a three-round open-mic free-verse showdown. Every TPS has a featured guest, and this month it’s Janice Lee: singer-songwriter, artistic director of Kitchener-Waterloo’s Poetry Slam, and winner of the 2013 Region of Waterloo’s Best Arts Mover and Shaker. The slam kicks off at 8 p.m.; contestants must be there to sign up at 7:30 p.m. sharp.

Details: Toronto Poetry Slam

The Wedding Singer Evokes ’80s (and Sandler) Nostalgia

Isaac Bell as Robbie and Ashley Gibson as Julia. Photo by Scott Gorman.

Isaac Bell as Robbie and Ashley Gibson as Julia. Photo by Scott Gorman.

  • Hart House Theatre (7 Hart House Circle)
  • 8 p.m.

It seems like the 1980s are an odd, distant time here in the middle of the second decade of the 21st century. It also feels like it’s been almost as long since Adam Sandler was making good comedies, instead of recent dreck like the Grown-Ups films or Jack & Jill. Films like The Wedding Singer and Happy Gilmour were sweet (and only slightly profane) comedies where the screw-up always gets the girl.

Hart House Theatre’s production of The Wedding Singer is set a year shy of 30 years ago in Ridgefield, New Jersey, and trades on the nostalgia for a film that was already trading on nostalgia with neon lighting (plenty of purple wash), retro fashion, and familiar songs—the ones created for the film, anyway. (Classics like “You Spin Me Right Round” and “Love Stinks” would have made the licensing astronomical.) The 2006 musical adaptation came up with some similar (and period) sounding numbers that, in some cases, actually improve on the original. It also streamlined some of the characters: for instance, the most memorable supporting characters in the film, sleazeball Sammy (Matt Pilipiak) and keyboardist George (Scott Farley), are now both Robbie’s best friends and bandmates.

The musical also does a better job of balancing out Robbie (Isaac Bell) and Julia’s (Ashley Gibson) scenes, as she gets some songs to sing too, instead of being just a love interest. Julia’s scenes with her cousin Holly (Romina Cortina) and her mother won’t pass film’s Bechdel test, but then the boys only talk about women as well—save for a few throwaway lines about their band and an act-two number where Julia’s jerk fiancé Glen (Howard Davis) tries to sell Robbie on the world of finance.

The ensemble is spirited and, despite some persistent sound tech issues relating to the body mics, the show sounds all right too. Of course, a show likes this succeeds on the charisma of its leads and character roles: Bell, Gibson, and especially Farley are all likeable and on-point with their comedic timing. The book dutifully checks off all the memorable moments (and lines) that people are likely to recall from the film, which is, we suppose, sort of the point. You’re more likely to leave the theatre humming one of the songs from the pre-show or intermission music than from the score, but you probably will leave humming rather than grumbling.

Details: The Wedding Singer Evokes ’80s (and Sandler) Nostalgia

Ongoing…

TIFF’s First Major Original Exhibition Traces David Cronenberg’s Evolution

20131029-David Cronenberg - Evolution - TIFF Lightbox-3565- Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
Details: TIFF’s First Major Original Exhibition Traces David Cronenberg’s Evolution