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cityscape

Hanlan’s Point Beachgoers Shouldn’t Have to be Nude

Nudists are vying for a bare-only beach. But the clothed deserve space, too.

Photo by Lú from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Photo by from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

On a blazing hot summer day in 2012, a friend of mine and I made the ferry crossing to Toronto Islands. We trekked down a sun-dappled, treed-in path a few minutes to a beach, found a quiet space, set up our towels, and slapped on some sunscreen—the usual beach routine, save that I had forgone a swimsuit. Hanlan’s Beach is, after all, one of Canada’s two clothing optional beaches, and I took full advantage of that.

It was my friend’s first time at Hanlan’s. He was nervous leading up to our beach plans, but I assured him that, while I’d be going nude, he was free to wear a swimsuit on the clothing-optional side of the beach. During one of our quick dips in the lake—where I tried not to think about what’s in the Lake Ontario water—he said he would go nude. I thought that was great, and let him peel off his swimsuit in his own time and adjust. We spent the rest of the day reading and chatting, cooling off when we needed to. It was a perfect beach day.

Hanlan’s Point beach has been a leisure destination for Toronto since the late 19th century. After years as an unofficial nude beach and a pilot project by the City, it received its designation as an official clothing-optional beach in 2002 due to the advocacy of several nudist/naturist groups. “Clothing-optional” is key, because you’ll see a spectrum of dress and undress along the southern side of the beach.

But some beachgoers are taking umbrage with that option.

Keep reading: Hanlan’s Point Beachgoers Shouldn’t Have to be Nude

cityscape

Terrible Decisions Made in the Heat This Week in the GTA

Hot temperatures = decline in better judgment, apparently.

At least this dog knows how to stay hydrated. Photo by Gary Baker from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

At least this dog knows how to stay hydrated. Photo by Gary Baker from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

This week’s weather has been unbearable for many in southern Ontario. In the past month in Toronto alone, there have been eight heat alerts and two extreme heat alerts issued by the City. Temperatures have hovered around 30 C, and there has been little rain to provide a respite.

And when the heat rises, people start to make some really poor decisions.

The past week in the GTA has been a showcase of what not to do when the temperatures spike. Consider these your cautionary tales for summer.
Keep reading: Terrible Decisions Made in the Heat This Week in the GTA

cityscape

How Torontonians are Hacking Pokémon Go

To catch them is my real test, to hack them is my cause.

Players met up outside the CN Tower on Monday to talk strategy and show off their bulging Pokédexes after the game’s official release across Canada. Photo by Kevin Lee.

Players met up outside the CN Tower on Monday to talk strategy and show off their bulging Pokédexes after the game’s official release across Canada. Photo by Kevin Lee.

A horde of gamers young and old gathered at the base of the CN Tower, Toronto’s most notable landmark in and outside of Niantic’s smash hit game Pokémon Go. They compared Pokédexes, shared locations, and made new friends among crews. It’s not an unusual scene since the game hit smartphone app stores in Canada earlier this week, and players are on the hunt to catch ’em all.

But one clever Pokémon enthusiast has used his coding expertise to hunt for the rarest monsters in the game.

Keep reading: How Torontonians are Hacking Pokémon Go

cityscape

You Can See What Toronto Library Patrons Are Searching For In Real Time

No no no, don't check that out. Read this instead.


A perennially popular news article looks at what library items patrons would like to see banned and why. It provides a moment where we can scratch our heads as to why Dr. Seuss’s classic children’s book Hop on Pop promotes violence against fathers, and sigh when works with legitimate artistic merit are brought into question.

With the Toronto Public Library’s push to provide more open data, now we have the opposite of the banned books story available at all times, as anyone can see what library patrons are searching for in real time.

Keep reading: You Can See What Toronto Library Patrons Are Searching For In Real Time