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Posts Filed Under: Cityscape

cityscape

For Torontonians with Disabilities, Riding the TTC is Still A Struggle

It will take nearly a decade for the entire system to be accessible.

Stairs at St. George Station. Photo by Jason Cook from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Stairs at St. George Station. Photo by Jason Cook from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

For me, public transit has always meant freedom. After living my high school years in the boonies, with only a handful of other houses, a general store, and town a 20-minute drive away, to say I was excited to go away for college is an understatement.

After living in Ottawa to attend Algonquin College in 2008, I learned what it’s like to get around with relative ease, to hop on a bus to get to a movie theatre or mall without any aid.

In 2011, I moved to Toronto and lived in residence at Ryerson University. Again, I was surrounded by public transit. But there were pitfalls, and though I live with a moderate form of Cerebral Palsy that allows me to walk with two canes, I found myself struggling to get around the city.

Five years later, the TTC still isn’t completely accessible for Torontonians, like me, with disabilities.

Keep reading: For Torontonians with Disabilities, Riding the TTC is Still A Struggle

cityscape

Mississauga City Council Was Right to Reverse its Ban on Uber

It's not the municipal government's job to tell people what ride-sharing apps they should use.

Toronto isn’t a hub of innovation. The venture capital community is famous for its stinginess, and we’re regressive when it comes to any disruptive technology. Fintech companies, for example, are having a hard time breaking in to Toronto, while their peers thrive in London and New York. There’s a reason we need to look to America to give us an imagined idea of our entrepreneurial spirit. That’s why we invent phrases like “Silicon Valley North,” so we can feel like we’re moving the right direction.

The problem is uniquely Canadian: we move too slow. In the modern economy, workers like cab drivers, who ideally work an eight-hour shift five days per week and take home enough money to make a solid living, will soon disappear. Canadian cities are at a crossroads where they can accept companies like Uber, the most divisive organization in the sharing economy today, or they can try their damnedest to ignore what consumers in their cities want, like Mississauga did.

But even the City of Mississauga has failed in this regard when it reversed its ban on Uber this week. It’s a sign of changing times: Canadian cities must accept the new norm that Uber brings, or face the consequence of irate citizens.

Keep reading: Mississauga City Council Was Right to Reverse its Ban on Uber

cityscape

A Different Kind of Finger-Painting on Spadina

Not your average digital art.

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BY: Unknown
LOCATION: Spadina and Dundas, Spadina and St. George
PHOTO BY: Martin Reis
FIELD NOTES: One thing is certain: this artist is handy with a can of spray paint! But seriously folks, we really like these pieces. The artist seems to have combined stenciling with an element of collage. The result is an aesthetic that is simultaneously simple and complex. It pays homage to traditional graffiti while making something new and unique. We very much hope to see more of these pieces pop up around the city.

Once a week, Vandalist features some of the most interesting street art and graffiti from around Toronto. Find something great? Email vandalist@torontoist.com.

cityscape

What You Should Explore at Doors Open 2016

Your guide to some of the best of the 130 buildings taking part in Doors Open this year.

If you’ve ever passed by a Toronto building and felt the urge to learn more, then this weekend is the chance to explore that curiosity.

Many of Toronto’s most well-known buildings–and hidden architectural treasures–will open their doors to the public this weekend for the 17th annual Doors Open Toronto. Doors Open, which takes place all over Ontario throughout the summer and into the fall, gives people a chance to step inside the histories and unique architecture of buildings they may see everyday.

This year, more than 130 buildings will open their doors to allow the public to take a look inside. Tours and special events will also happen at many of the buildings, while others offer a chance to create your own self-guided tour.

For the first time this year Doors Open will have walking tours so people can take in more of what Toronto offers in a structured fashion, rather than being totally left to their own devices. Another first for this is a keynote speech from Karim Rashid, an award-winning architect, on the historic Trading Floor on Friday at 7 p.m.

But what are the right venues for you to check out? Luckily Torontoist is here to break it all down for you.

Keep reading: What You Should Explore at Doors Open 2016

cityscape

We Need Toronto Police to be More Accountable in the Deaths of Black Citizens

If you thought the U.S. was worse off, think again.

Photo by Zun Lee from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Photo by Zun Lee from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

After almost two years since the death of Jermaine Carby, we finally know the name of the police officer who shot and killed him.

At a coroner’s inquest earlier this month into the death of the 33-year-old Brampton man, Constable Ryan Reid of the Peel Police was revealed as the officer who shot Carby. When relating the events that led up to the shooting to the inquest’s all-white jury, Reid said: “I would not do anything differently.”

If that lack of empathy and remorse sounds familiar to you, it’s because it is exactly what George Zimmermann said when he shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin four years ago, in Sanford, Florida.

Keep reading: We Need Toronto Police to be More Accountable in the Deaths of Black Citizens