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cityscape

How Toronto Is Dealing With Its Waterfront Pollution

David Clark has been living in Toronto since 1985. He fishes along Toronto’s harbour and the city’s parks every week all year with a few of his friends. Not every part of the experience is pleasant.

“We’re constantly hooking wet wipes off the bottom of the harbour,” he said. 

Clark is the co-founder of the group Toronto Urban Fishing Ambassadors and a licensed recreational fisher. He says fishable waters are defined by water quality, fish habitat, aquatic habitat, food web, species diversity, and the fisheries they can support—which have been improving in Toronto, according to him.

“What we haven’t fixed is the main source of current contamination,” Clark said. “We’re allowing new contaminants through the sewer system, and that’s a big problem.”

Clark says after a big rain storm, “The water [in the harbour] goes brown, it goes coffee brown.”

Keep reading: How Toronto Is Dealing With Its Waterfront Pollution

cityscape

Toronto’s Dying Well Collective Wants to Break the Stigma of Talking About Death

Talking about dying can seem scary, but a Toronto group wants to change that.

In Canada, efforts to break the stigma around childbirth and sexual health have led to more open conversations about once-taboo topics. The same can’t yet be said about dying and end-of-life care.

Toronto’s Dying Well Collective is trying to change that. Working out of the Centre for Social Innovation in the Annex, co-founders Glenda Myles and Susan Dawson are trying to start more open conversations about death and advocate for better community resources for people at the end of their lives.

Our goal is to allow people to die in the manner of their own choosing. If people want to choose to die at home, we should be able to create a system that supports that,” Myles says. “I don’t think you do that by creating another layer of the medical system. I think you do that by creating community or community access to some of the people who have that knowledge base.”

Keep reading: Toronto’s Dying Well Collective Wants to Break the Stigma of Talking About Death