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Historicist: The Man the Rocks Talked To

A.P. Coleman uncovered Toronto's prehistory, among other adventures.

Excavation at the Brick Works in the Don Valley c. 1908. Photo from the City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1244, Item 2475.

Excavation at the Brick Works in the Don Valley c. 1908. Photo from the City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1244, Item 2475.

If you’re at the Evergreen Brick Works Market in the Don Valley, walk north along some 200 yards of lovingly created wetland. When you’ve gone about 50 yards past that, you will be on a little rise. Look behind over your shoulder for a view of the downtown skyline.

Then keep on walking until you get to a little cul-de-sac and look at the cliff face that you have been staring ahead at for the last while. It is overgrown. The small plaque in front of you states that you are facing one of the oldest geological formations in the Toronto region and that it was first “discovered” (let’s be more precise and call it “labelled”) in the 1890s by geologist A.P. Coleman (April 4, 1852–February 26, 1939), a scientist and public intellectual of great renown in his day and a figure still dimly remembered now. Coleman’s work on the traces of the last great ice age (the Pleistocene) enable us to view the Brick Works park within the broad perspective of the long history of our city.

Keep reading: Historicist: The Man the Rocks Talked To

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Tracking the ‘Alt-Right’ in Toronto

The Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville has emboldened Canadian white nationalists, who are organizing and appear to be on the rise.

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University of Virginia students, who bravely stood up to hundreds of torch-wielding white nationalists that marched on the campus in Charlottesville last weekend. Photo via @CollinRees on Twitter.

White nationalist “alt-right” groups are hoping to gain a foothold in Toronto, but they will face strong resistance from Toronto’s anti-fascist and anti-racist community. The Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia has resulted in widespread condemnation of the “alt-right” in Canada, which is increasingly being understood as a white nationalist or white supremacy movement.
Keep reading: Tracking the ‘Alt-Right’ in Toronto