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Your Guide to Jane’s Walk 2016

For every type of walker in the city.

This year marks the centennial of Jane Jacobs’s birth, and the ninth year of Jane’s Walks. From a start of just a few dozen strolls through Toronto, Jane’s Walk has grown into a global phenomenon, with walks taking place on every continent—except Antarctica (though penguins may organize a walk next year).

With more than 200 walks crisscrossing the GTA this year, you have more options than ever to celebrate Jane Jacobs’ 100th birthday. But with all that choice comes a greater degree of difficulty in deciding what walks you might want to take.

Here are some walks for you, if…

Keep reading: Your Guide to Jane’s Walk 2016

cityscape

Kensington Market is Becoming a Haven for Pot Dispensaries

"I'm so surprised," said no one ever.

Photo by Nico from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Photo by Nico from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

On a road trip from Florida to San Diego and up the Pacific coast to British Columbia, Chris Cardozo made a pit stop in Venice Beach, California, where he purchased a licence to buy marijuana from dispensaries. From there, the Toronto-bound Cardozo stopped at dispensaries all along the way. “This is how it should be everywhere,” he thought. “This is awesome.”

Cardozo saw the weed industry like Mark Zuckerberg saw the internet: it was prosperous. He needed to get his foot in—and Toronto was the next mecca.

With help from business partners, Cardozo opened his own dispensary in Kensington Market: Toronto Holistic Cannabinoids, or THC (the acronym was intentional). Sitting on the corner of Baldwin Street and Kensington Avenue, THC was the second dispensary in the Market when it opened in July 2015. Now, almost a year later, there are 10 others.

The Market, Cardozo predicts, is well on its way to becoming Toronto’s hub for medicinal marijuana. “I don’t think these shops are going anywhere,” he says.

Keep reading: Kensington Market is Becoming a Haven for Pot Dispensaries

cityscape

The Public Art that Lives Under the Gardiner

The Under Gardiner project isn't the first effort to transform the otherwise bleak expanse.

"Yard Stones" by Adad Hannah are situated underneath the Gardiner by Bathurst and Fort York.  Photo: Beatrice Paez

“Yard Stones” by Adad Hannah are situated underneath the Gardiner by Bathurst and Fort York.
Photo: Beatrice Paez

BY: Adad Hannah
LOCATION: 20 Bruyeres Mews, The Yards at Fort York
COMMISSIONED: 2012

The Gardiner Expressway’s crumbling underbelly can’t easily fashion itself as a hangout—even in a neighbourhood sorely lacking in open spaces.

Under Gardiner, a $25-million project funded by philanthropists Judy and Wil Matthews, makes a daring promise to reimagine the area below as a cultural site for residents and passersby to congregate. But it isn’t the first effort to transform an otherwise bleak and desolate expanse.

Tucked underneath the expressway is a courtyard, along Bathurst and Bruyeres Mews, complete with its own set of bicycle stands and public art sculptures. It’s presumably a spot condo residents from the growing community can retreat to. At least, that was the developer’s intent.

Keep reading: The Public Art that Lives Under the Gardiner