Newsstand: March 28, 2016 | news | Torontoist



Newsstand: March 28, 2016

Good morning one and all. In the news today: a Toronto resident and Canadian citizen was held in the Rexdale immigration detention centre for over a month, 10,000 households in the province are still without power after last week's ice storm, Rob Ford's body is in City Hall, and what to do about the Gardiner.

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Toronto resident Gabriel Chan is suing the Canadian Border Services Agency after an interaction with a GO Transit officer led to his detention in a immigration facility for 38 days in 2015. Chan was born and raised in the Philippines, but his biological father is a Canadian citizen; as such, Chan is a Canadian citizen, but he didn’t actually put in an application to declare that until after his detention. When he was asked for proof of payment and then identification by the transit officer, all Chan had on him were his Filipino and international drivers’ licenses. Chan was taken to the Rexdale immigration detention centre, where he was held even after officials were given a test proving his father is Benjamin Esguerra, a Canadian citizen.

Several days after the ice storm that hit southern Ontario last week, more than 10,000 homes in the province are still without power; power has been restored to roughly 108,000 homes. Orangeville and Alliston have the largest groups of households that remain without electricity. Some power lines had to be completely rebuilt.

Visitation for former mayor Rob Ford will begin Monday and go on for two days at City Hall, where his body will lie in repose. It is meant to be a “celebration of life” planned by his family. Ford, a controversial and often politically retrograde figure who spent a decade on city council representing Etobicoke before being elected mayor in 2010, was diagnosed with cancer in 2014.

City council has already rejected a proposal to merge the Gardiner Expressway with Lake Shore Boulevard, and is now looking at the option of rebuilding Gardiner East instead using the $1-billion “Hybrid 3” proposal. By many metrics, it would make more sense to tear down the elevated highway, but it appears that won’t be happening.