Today Thu Fri
It is forcast to be Partly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on April 23, 2014
Partly Cloudy
9°/2°
It is forcast to be Partly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on April 24, 2014
Partly Cloudy
14°/5°
It is forcast to be Chance of Rain at 11:00 PM EDT on April 25, 2014
Chance of Rain
16°/5°

events

Weekend Planner: February 8-9, 2014

In this Weekend Planner: roller derby's best of the best, naked girls reading, and VHS vengeance.

CN Power sees a win in their near future. Photo by ezio+ian.

  • Sports: The best of the best in roller derby are taking to the flat track for the opening bout of their 2014 season. It’s CN Power versus Team Ontario—Toronto’s all-star team will be going up against some of our province’s toughest ladies. This one is bound to get bruisey! Bring blankets or folding chairs and set yourself up track-side to get as close to the action as possible. The Bunker, Downsview Park (40 Carl Hall Road, Studio 3), Saturday at 6 p.m., $12 from outlets, $14 online, $18 door. Details
  • Art: Your local pub is about to be taken over…by works of art! For one night only, over twenty local artists under the age of 30 are setting up shop in the upstairs of Betty’s on King. Their exhibit, “Hey, We Here’s Good Art,” showcases a wide range of illustration, photography, print, sketches, and video. Betty’s (Upstairs) (240 King Street East), Saturday at 7:45 p.m., FREE. Details
  • Dance: Dancers of all types are coming together to perform in Dancenette, a short monthly showcase. On the programme are Flamenco fusion from Zingari Dance Fusion, Russian character dance from Revival, bellydance and hip-hop by Sarita, Polynesian fusion from Dance Sister Dance, and much more. Discover new dance styles, while supporting local up-and-comers; you might even be inspired to start taking classes yourself! Arabesque Dance Academy (1 Gloucester Street), Sunday at 7 p.m., $10 advance, $15 door. Details
  • Books: No, you’re not a pervert, Naked Girls Reading is exactly what you’re imagining—lovely ladies narrating in the nude. Since February is “love month,” this edition’s theme is Bad Romance. Come out and hear Red Herring, Beaver Galore, Lisbon Maginot, Svetlana Konswallow, Lilla Koi, and Muffin Topp read about sexual snafus and romantic failings found in how-to guides, sci-fi stories, and more. ROUND Venue (152a Augusta Avenue), Sunday at 7 p.m., $20 advance, $25 door. Details
  • Film: The boys at Modern Superior are bringing yet another VHS classic to the masses with Video Vengeance #3. This time they’re going with 1991′s Showdown in Little Tokyo, which sees a pair of muscle-bound, martial artist LA cops team up to fight the Yakuza, a Japanese criminal organization. What sets this apart from other action movies, you ask? Dolph Lundgren plays an orphaned white American raised in Japan, and Brandon Lee a Japanese-American valley-dude from California. Because, why not? Come out, grab a drink, and witness the ridiculousness, you might even win a raffle prize! KITCH (229 Geary Avenue), Sunday at 7:30 p.m., FREE. Details

Ongoing…

  • Art: Virginia Woolf once remarked that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” Whether it actually did is debatable, but the curators of “The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection 1910–1918” use that year to start their exhibition of works from a tumultuous decade of innovation in European fine art. Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West), all day, $16.50–$25 (includes general admission). Details
  • Film: Jean-Luc Godard’s effort to haul the cinema out of its infancy and into a kind of artistic maturity is the subject of TIFF Cinematheque’s newest and fullest retrospective in some time, a two-season programme entitled Godard Forever, which is intended to span the length of the filmmaker’s remarkable, varied career—from the jazz-infused improvisation of Breathless to the Marxist montage of recent work like Film Socialisme. The first half of that retrospective, a fifteen-film programme dedicated to what most consider Godard’s golden age—the period from 1960′s Breathless to 1967’s apocalyptic, decade-capping Weekend—runs this season, highlighting the period in which Godard famously moulded existing genres like Hollywood gangster pictures and musicals into his own unique creations. TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West). Details
  • Theatre: It’s 1931 in Berlin, and the Nazis are on the brink of supremacy. But there remains another side to the city—one that’s decadent, permissive, and artistic. And that’s the world we meet when we’re beckoned into the extravagant and sleazy Kit Kat Klub by eccentric Emcee and his troupe of saucy dancers, performing “Willkommen.” Cabaret’s primary plotline begins with the arrival of American writer Cliff Bradshaw (David Light). Without a real agenda, he’s come to Berlin to work on his novel and teach English. A patron of the Kit Kat Klub, he catches the eye of the star performer Sally Bowles (Kylie McMahon). A natural stunner, Sally is a bubbly young Brit with a powerhouse voice, a dancer’s grace, and a reputation for flitting from man to man like a bumblebee in a flowerbed. It’s not long before she and Cliff fall in love—though the question of whether he’ll be able to satisfy her wild side constantly hangs over their heads. The sweetness lacking in their relationship can be found in the romantic pairing of the boarding house landlord Fraulein Schneider (Adeen Ashton Fogle) and Jewish shop owner Herr Schultz (Don Berns). As appealing as they are, though, these middle-aged lovebirds are just as susceptible to trouble and heartbreak as their younger counterparts. Lower Ossington Theatre (100 Ossington Avenue), $49-$59. Details
  • Dance: Choreographer (and recent MacArthur fellow) Kyle Abraham was inspired to create The Radio Show after two events: the only urban radio station in his hometown of Pittsburgh went off the air in 2009, and Alzheimer’s took away his father’s ability to communicate. The Radio Show is a celebration of the radio as a way to engage with popular music, discuss issues both weighty and mundane, and perhaps most importantly, create both individual memories and shared experiences that persist even after a station’s off the air. Harbourfront Centre, Fleck Dance Theatre (207 Queens Quay West), $39. Details
  • Food: Time once again for the City of Toronto’s annual cold-weather enticement to get people out to fine dining establishments, the Winterlicious Festival. Over 200 restaurants have signed up to offer lunch and dinner prix-fixe menus over the official two-week period (many of them continue the pricing for longer), and the City’s also arranged for a number of different culinary events as well. For a full listing of the restaurants participating, visit the City’s website. $15–$45. Details
  • Fashion: Ichimaru—once one of Japan’s most famous geishas—left the profession in the 1930s to pursue a career in entertainment. Never really leaving her past life, she became known for adorning herself in the traditional geisha garb when performing in concert or on television. “From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru” exhibits several decades’ worth of outfits and personal effects, shedding light on the woman behind the makeup. Textile Museum of Canada (55 Centre Avenue), Saturday at 11 a.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m., $6-$15. Details
  • Art: Those who work in the arts are well acquainted with the balancing act between creative work and life-sustaining day jobs. “Poetic Poverty; Experiments in Living” explores the notion of the starving artist, and why it’s a life so many choose to lead. This two-week show features works by Erin Loree, Stella Cade, Kevin Columbus, and more. Creatures Creating (822 Dundas Street West), Saturday at 12 p.m., FREE. Details
  • Theatre: The word “idiot” was originally used in ancient Greece to describe a person unconcerned with public affairs like politics, but dedicated to following private pursuits. The setting of Robert E. Sherwood’s 1936 romantic comedy Idiot’s Delight, a failing luxury hotel in the Italian Alps called the Hotel Monte Gabriele, initially seems to be full of idiots: newlyweds on their honeymoon, a group of burlesque singers and their manager, a blissfully genial waiter, and a couple of ornery managers sour over the lack of business. And when a spark flies between a beautiful and mysterious Russian and a smooth-talking American showbusinessman, while the other guests dance, drink, eat, and sing, there’s another piece of juicy plot that can be used to distract themselves, and the audience, from the war that’s literally raging outside the hotel windows. Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane), Saturday at 1:30 p.m.,7:30 p.m., $29–$74. Details
  • Theatre: Chances are, you have a couple of pictures on your phone that were taken for “someone special.” But what if they got shared with the world? Nightwood Theatre’s Free Outgoing focuses on the issues of sexuality and safety in our digital age. The play follows the plight of Deepa, a scholarly 15-year-old girl living in the conservative city of Chennai. When the sex video she makes with her boyfriend goes viral, she must deal with the fallout of becoming India’s most watched teenager. Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $25-$45. Details
  • Dance: The producers of Riverdance have spawned yet another on-stage extravaganza. With a talented cast of 38, Heartbeat of Home is a high-energy show, combining Irish, Latin, and Afro-Cuban music and dance. Torontonians get the honour of seeing the production’s North American debut—take it in before it’s gone! Ed Mirvish Theatre (244 Victoria Avenue), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $35-$130. Details
  • Theatre: Let’s face it: being a twenty-something can kinda suck. Pumped full of confidence and aspirations, we flee the family nest…and fall flat on our faces. Avenue Q uses songs (written by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx) and puppetry both to lament and poke fun at this difficult time. Much like Sesame Street, it has a cast made up of human actors who interact with a variety of furry creatures, who themselves have hands up their butts. Think that description is tasteless? This might not be the show for you—these puppets are crude and lewd, and have a taste for alcohol and porn. Don’t say you weren’t warned. Lower Ossington Theatre (100 Ossington Avenue), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 4 p.m., $49-$59. Details
  • Theatre: Cameron and his grandmother share a special tradition: every Thursday night, they escape into the golden age of film together. A musical about unconditional love, The Way Back to Thursday takes us through the changes in this relationship as Cameron grows older and more distant. Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue), Saturday at 2 p.m.,7:30 p.m., PWYC-$32.50 + HST. Details
  • Theatre: In 2006, the quiet town of Ipswich, England, was turned upside down by the discovery of five dead women. During this time, playwright Alecky Blythe recorded extensive interviews with the nearby residents. Set to music, these audio clips form the script to London Road, a raw piece of theatre illustrating tragedy’s ability to fortify a community. Bluma Appel Theatre (27 Front Street East), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $24-$99. Details
  • Theatre: Morro and Jasp are clown sisters created and played by Heather Marie Annis and Amy Lee, comedians and Factory Theatre writers-in-residence. In their newest adventure, they fall on hard times and take up acting in hopes of making ends meet. Of Mice and Morro and Jasp sees them attempt to bring the classic John Steinbeck tale to the stage. Will they succeed? Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m., PWYC-$25. Details
  • Theatre: The Acting Up Stage Company brings the French Antilles to Toronto audiences with its new musical, Once On This Island. Set to an exuberant Caribbean score, we see the gods test the dark-skinned Ti Moune by sending her on a quest after she falls in love with a higher-class, light-skinned man. Daniels Spectrum (585 Dundas Street East), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $30-$50. Details
  • Dance: Told through South American music and dance, Arrabal is the story of a young girl desperate to find out what happened to her father after the Argentine military made him disappear when she was just a baby. Her search leads her to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires, where she discovers both the truth, and herself. Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $44-$84. Details
  • Theatre: Even though Billy was born deaf, his family strived to raise him the same way they would have a hearing-able child. Tribes sees him learn what it is to hear and be heard when he meets Sylvia, a young woman who is gradually becoming deaf herself. Presented by A Theatrefront Production, Canadian Stage, and Theatre Aquarius, this emotional play stars Stephen Drabicki and Holly Lewis. Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street), Saturday at 2 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $22-$47. Details
  • Film: Ever enjoyed a movie so much that you wanted to be in it? 360 Screenings can make that dream a reality. Combining film with live theatre, they allow audiences to get up close and personal with notable movies by re-enacting pivotal scenes, and then follow that with a screening of the film. With Valentine’s Day quickly approaching, LOVE will be the theme of the night. The catch? The (downtown Toronto) venue will be kept secret until 24 hours beforehand. , Saturday at 2 p.m.,7 p.m., $60, $30 for those under 30. Details
  • Theatre: German theatre has gone over really well in Toronto in recent years. Playwright Roland Schimmelpfennig’s contribution to Volcano Theatre’s Africa project was widely praised, and twinwerks//zwillingswerk’s production of Felicia Zeller’s Kaspar and the Sea of Houses earned the company an outstanding production award at the 2011 SummerWorks (and a trip back to 2012′s festival). Now, Theatre Smash returns with Marius von Mayenburg’s The Ugly One, a clever slice of absurdism that works well on several levels. There’s light humour when the titular character discovers that everyone finds his face repugnant, and darker tones when his new, beautiful face becomes coveted obsessively by those around him. Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue), Saturday at 2:30 p.m.,8 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m., $13–$53. Details
  • Performing Arts: The Canadian Opera Company brings a tale of forbidden love to its stage with Verdi’s A Masked Ball (Un Ballo in Maschera). Given an almost-modern treatment, the story has been transplanted to early 1960s America, where the romantic entanglements are played out against a background of Kennedy-era political tensions. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (145 Queen Street West), Saturday at 7:30 p.m., $24-$332. Details
  • Outdoors: It’s time to lace up! Harbourfront Centre has brought back its weekly DJ Skate Nights at Natrel Rink, overlooking the lake. Make the best of winter, and get your skate on to the sounds of some of Toronto’s premiere DJs and party-makers, like Skratch Bastid (Dec 14), Cherry Bomb (Feb 1), and DJ Starting from Scratch (Feb 22). Natrel Rink, Harbourfront Centre (235 Queens Quay West), Saturday at 8 p.m., FREE. Details
  • Theatre: The Scarborough Music Theatre brings Louisa May Alcott’s classic Civil War story to the stage for a short run. Little Women follows the lives and struggles of four young sisters as they grow up while their father is off at war. Directed by Michael Jones, this musical features spirit-lifting and tear-jerking performances by Lauren Lazar, Katie Wise, Carina Cautillo, and Sarah DaCunha. Scarborough Village Theatre (3600 Kingston Road), Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m., $27. Details
  • Theatre: In Tarragon Theatre’s current mainstage production, Flesh and Other Fragments of Love, there are both a marriage and a body on the rocks, and the prognosis isn’t good for either of them. While the human figure appears pale, cold, and lifeless, the marriage is slightly more alive, and the play chronicles its last dying breaths. Surprisingly, though, the young female cadaver is by far the more interesting of the two. Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue), Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m., $21–$53. Details
  • Comedy: Bad Dog Theatre launches its 12th annual Globehead Tournament for the month of February, and the teams slated to compete are particularly stacked this year. Along with Torontoist favourites like the National Theatre of the World, Tony Ho, and the Sufferettes, there’s a bunch of new teams featuring some of our favourite improvisers, including Michael Fassbender (Picnicface’s Kyle Dooley and Versus Valerie’s Hannah Spear, who just won an IAWT award) and the Muggers (Two Weird Ladies’ Mandy Sellers and Illusionoid’s Nug Nahrgang.) The preliminary rounds run Friday and Saturday the first two weekends in February; the quarter-finals, Friday, February 14 and Saturday, February 15; and the semi-finals and finals, February 21 and 22. For the full schedule and ticket pricing, check out Bad Dog’s website. Comedy Bar (945 Bloor Street West), Saturday at 8 p.m., $10–$40. Details
  • Markets: Winter might make us want to hibernate and rely solely on the stock of food in the freezer, but don’t let it! Come out to Steam Whistle’s Winter Farmer’s Market to pick up fresh fruits, vegetables, baked goods, and organic meats—all the while supporting local farmers. It’s worth venturing out into the cold, don’t you think? Steam Whistle Brewing (255 Bremner Boulevard), Sunday at 10 a.m., FREE. Details
  • Theatre: What do you get when you combine Mozart and Atom Egoyan? Così fan tutte, a wryly comedic opera. Also known as The School For Lovers, it sees two couples struggle with issues of faith, desire, and temptation. The Canadian Opera Company welcomes the return of Egoyan, who will be directing this winter season opener. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (145 Queen Street West), Sunday at 2 p.m., $24-$365. Details

Happening soon:

Urban Planner is Torontoist‘s guide to what’s on in Toronto, published every weekday morning, and in a weekend edition Friday afternoons. If you have an event you’d like considered, email us with all the details (including images, if you’ve got any), ideally at least a week in advance.

Comments