Today Thu Fri
It is forcast to be Partly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on April 16, 2014
Partly Cloudy
5°/1°
It is forcast to be Partly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on April 17, 2014
Partly Cloudy
8°/4°
It is forcast to be Overcast at 11:00 PM EDT on April 18, 2014
Overcast
12°/5°

events

Urban Planner: February 20, 2014

In today's Urban Planner: a quippy talk show, found-footage horror, and talking about movies about books.

Nicky Nasrallah, host of Quip Talk. Image courtesy of Nicky Nasrallah.

  • Film: Every two months, book and movie lovers alike are treated to Book Revue, a new type of reading club. This time around, TIFF international programmer Jane Schoettle will be on hand to present a screening of What’s Eating Gilbert Grape? In it, Johnny Depp plays Gilbert, a young man stuck in a small town, saddled with big responsibilities—including a younger brother with a developmental disability (Leonardo DiCaprio). Join Jane for a post-screening discussion about the book and its film adaptation. The Revue Cinema (400 Roncesvalles Avenue), 6:45 p.m., $13, $10 for members. Details
  • Performing Arts: Want to be part of a live studio audience for the taping of a talk show that has nothing to do with paternity tests? Come out to Quip Talk with Nicky Nasrallah for a fun evening of interviews, comedy, music, and more. Guests on this episode include stand-up comedians Elvira Kurt and Fraser Young, and singer-songwriter Mandippal. LOT Comedy Club (100 Ossington Avenue), 8 p.m., FREE. Details
  • Comedy: The funny folks in Touch My Stereotype have an exciting new show to help us get through this dreary season. Their three-day-long revue—Hypothetical Spectacle— is packed with music, comedic sketches, videos, and more from Amanda McQueen, Lars Classington, Russell McLeod, Sima Sepehri, Robert Murphy, Liz Johnston, Eitan Shalmon, Padraigh MacDonald, and Chantale Renee. Unit 102 Theatre (376 Dufferin Street), 9 p.m., $12 advance, $15 door. Details
  • Film: Rue Morgue is revamping its monthly film screenings to better cater to the die-hard horror fan. At its new home, the Royal Cinema, CineMacabre now comes complete with a concession stand full of sickening (in a good way) snacks, and a bar! This month’s offering is the Canadian premiere of Brian Netto and Adam Schindler’s Delivery. This found-footage film—which could be described as the cinematic love child of Rosemary’s Baby and Paranormal Activity—sees Rachel and Kyle document their life on a reality lifestyle show as they prepare for their first child. But what the cameras catch will never make it to air… The Royal Cinema (608 College Street), 9:30 p.m., $10. Details

Ongoing…

  • Art: Virginia Woolf once remarked that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” Whether it actually did is debatable, but the curators of “The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection 1910–1918” use that year to start their exhibition of works from a tumultuous decade of innovation in European fine art. Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West), all day, $16.50–$25 (includes general admission). Details
  • Theatre: It’s 1931 in Berlin, and the Nazis are on the brink of supremacy. But there remains another side to the city—one that’s decadent, permissive, and artistic. And that’s the world we meet when we’re beckoned into the extravagant and sleazy Kit Kat Klub by eccentric Emcee and his troupe of saucy dancers, performing “Willkommen.” Cabaret’s primary plotline begins with the arrival of American writer Cliff Bradshaw (David Light). Without a real agenda, he’s come to Berlin to work on his novel and teach English. A patron of the Kit Kat Klub, he catches the eye of the star performer Sally Bowles (Kylie McMahon). A natural stunner, Sally is a bubbly young Brit with a powerhouse voice, a dancer’s grace, and a reputation for flitting from man to man like a bumblebee in a flowerbed. It’s not long before she and Cliff fall in love—though the question of whether he’ll be able to satisfy her wild side constantly hangs over their heads. The sweetness lacking in their relationship can be found in the romantic pairing of the boarding house landlord Fraulein Schneider (Adeen Ashton Fogle) and Jewish shop owner Herr Schultz (Don Berns). As appealing as they are, though, these middle-aged lovebirds are just as susceptible to trouble and heartbreak as their younger counterparts. Lower Ossington Theatre (100 Ossington Avenue), $49-$59. Details
  • Fashion: Ichimaru—once one of Japan’s most famous geishas—left the profession in the 1930s to pursue a career in entertainment. Never really leaving her past life, she became known for adorning herself in the traditional geisha garb when performing in concert or on television. “From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru” exhibits several decades’ worth of outfits and personal effects, shedding light on the woman behind the makeup. Textile Museum of Canada (55 Centre Avenue), 11 a.m., $6-$15. Details
  • Theatre: At 35 years old, the Rhubarb Festival at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre may be nearing middle age, but it’s still the place to go if you’re looking for experimental, boundary-breaking, not-your-theatre-next-door kind of stuff in Canada. Every February, Buddies in Bad Times warms up the Church Street neighbourhood with public works, cabarets, live performance art, and a robust lineup of emerging and established artists pushing their own limits and those of the political and cultural moment. Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street), 6 p.m., FREE to $20. Details
  • Performing Arts: The Canadian Opera Company brings a tale of forbidden love to its stage with Verdi’s A Masked Ball (Un Ballo in Maschera). Given an almost-modern treatment, the story has been transplanted to early 1960s America, where the romantic entanglements are played out against a background of Kennedy-era political tensions. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (145 Queen Street West), 7:30 p.m., $24-$332. Details
  • Theatre: The word “idiot” was originally used in ancient Greece to describe a person unconcerned with public affairs like politics, but dedicated to following private pursuits. The setting of Robert E. Sherwood’s 1936 romantic comedy Idiot’s Delight, a failing luxury hotel in the Italian Alps called the Hotel Monte Gabriele, initially seems to be full of idiots: newlyweds on their honeymoon, a group of burlesque singers and their manager, a blissfully genial waiter, and a couple of ornery managers sour over the lack of business. And when a spark flies between a beautiful and mysterious Russian and a smooth-talking American showbusinessman, while the other guests dance, drink, eat, and sing, there’s another piece of juicy plot that can be used to distract themselves, and the audience, from the war that’s literally raging outside the hotel windows. Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane), 7:30 p.m., $29–$74. Details
  • Theatre: Bollywood is the force that brings two stories of self-exploration together in Same Same But Different. After her mother’s life is changed by a run-in with the world of Indian cinema, Aisha—a Canadian-born actress—realizes that she must face her prejudices about nationality and skin colour in order to rise to stardom. Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue), 7:30 p.m., PWYC–$32.50+HST. Details
  • Dance: The producers of Riverdance have spawned yet another on-stage extravaganza. With a talented cast of 38, Heartbeat of Home is a high-energy show, combining Irish, Latin, and Afro-Cuban music and dance. Torontonians get the honour of seeing the production’s North American debut—take it in before it’s gone! Ed Mirvish Theatre (244 Victoria Avenue), 8 p.m., $35-$130. Details
  • Theatre: The Scarborough Music Theatre brings Louisa May Alcott’s classic Civil War story to the stage for a short run. Little Women follows the lives and struggles of four young sisters as they grow up while their father is off at war. Directed by Michael Jones, this musical features spirit-lifting and tear-jerking performances by Lauren Lazar, Katie Wise, Carina Cautillo, and Sarah DaCunha. Scarborough Village Theatre (3600 Kingston Road), 8 p.m., $27. Details
  • Dance: Told through South American music and dance, Arrabal is the story of a young girl desperate to find out what happened to her father after the Argentine military made him disappear when she was just a baby. Her search leads her to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires, where she discovers both the truth, and herself. Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street), 8 p.m., $44-$84. Details
  • Theatre: Even though Billy was born deaf, his family strived to raise him the same way they would have a hearing-able child. Tribes sees him learn what it is to hear and be heard when he meets Sylvia, a young woman who is gradually becoming deaf herself. Presented by A Theatrefront Production, Canadian Stage, and Theatre Aquarius, this emotional play stars Stephen Drabicki and Holly Lewis. Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street), 8 p.m., $22-$47. Details
  • Theatre: Sterling Studio Theatre calls issues of morality into question with its production of George Bernard Shaw’s Mrs. Warren’s Profession. When Kitty Warren’s daughter Vivie finds out just how her mother has been supporting their family, she must re-evaluate her views on sex, money, and power. Sterling Theatre (163 Sterling Road), 8 p.m., $18-$23. Details
  • Theatre: What would happen if two characters from different books were to meet up outside their narratives? This is the basis of Brian Friel’s Afterplay, which explores the hypothetical relationship between two Anton Chekhov creations—Sonya from Uncle Vanya and Andrey from Three Sisters. For the price of admission, you’ll also get to indulge in authentic Russian tea during the performance, courtesy of the Campbell House. Campbell House Museum (160 Queen Street West), 8 p.m., $25. Details

Happening soon:

Urban Planner is Torontoist‘s guide to what’s on in Toronto, published every weekday morning, and in a weekend edition Friday afternoons. If you have an event you’d like considered, email us with all the details (including images, if you’ve got any), ideally at least a week in advance.

Comments