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news

Newsstand: January 22, 2013

In which your writer gets her pun on. In the news: the province backs down on Bill 115; young adults are leading a boom in the downtown core; people get mad about strollers, again; Princess Margaret Hospital gets a sizeable donation; when it comes to real estate in Toronto, it actually could be worse; and Riverdale gives Tragically Hip Way a run for its money by honouring its own famous musicians.



The Ontario government will repeal Bill 115, but teachers say that the largely symbolic move—the two-year contracts imposed on Ontario public-school teachers remain in place—doesn’t solve the problems that have lead to organized one-day work actions in schools across the province. “It’s not going to change anything — it still doesn’t resolve any fundamental issues or concerns that both school boards and certain bargaining units would have,” said Ontario Public School Boards’ Association President Michael Barrett. Teachers’ unions have said that they’ll review the decision asking members not to run extracurriculars in schools on March 1 and are waiting until a new provincial Liberal leader is chosen to decide what comes next in their ongoing dispute with the Province over contracts and funding.

Thanks in large part to Echo Boomers—born between 1972 and 1992—the population in Toronto’s downtown core has more than tripled in the past five years, according to a report by TD Bank released on Monday. The Echoers’ desire to live close to where they work and spend their free time is a reverse of their parents’ moves to the suburbs. “There’s been a surge in construction of mixed-use communities in Toronto, which is attracting a more youthful, urban crowd who don’t want a long commute,” said Francis Fong, author of the TD report. “They want to be close to their jobs, surrounded by great restaurants and night life. They want the whole nine yards.” Echo Boomers are now the largest age group in the country and make up close to half of the population in the city’s downtown core, which is encouraging businesses to follow their lead and increasingly locate their offices downtown instead of in the burbs. And yes, this means that people born as late as 1992 are living on their own. Bet you feel old now.

Gird yourself for another kids-versus-no-kids battle, Torontonians, one that could make the fight over strollers in brunch hotspots seem tame. Because of a rider complaint, the TTC is looking at the issue of strollers on crowded streetcars and buses. Elsa La Rosa spoke before the 11-person transit commission on Monday, asking them to impose a $2 charge per stroller and limit the number allowed on buses during peak hours. TTC chair Karen Stintz and head Andy Byford don’t seem too keen on the idea, but the discussion has already heated up on Twitter. Neither official commented on the irony of the suggestion coming just as the city kicked off Red Tape Awareness Week.

In news that should just make everyone feel happy, not contentious, philanthropist and very wealthy person Emmanuelle Gattuso has made a $50-million donation—the largest private gift for cancer research in Canada—to Princess Margaret Hospital in support of personalized medicine, which uses the genetic information from individual patients to delivery highly specified diagnoses and treatments. Gattuso, who made the donation with her husband Allan Slaight, was herself successfully treated for breast cancer at Princess Margaret. The donation, spread over 10 years, will support the hiring and research of more cancer specialists at the hospital.

Looking to enter Toronto’s spendy real-estate market? You can take some comfort in the fact that it’s Vancouver, not our city, that ranks as the second-least-affordable housing market in the world, bested only by Hong Kong and followed by Sydney. The bad news is that Toronto actually became less affordable, while Vancouver became more affordable, though that may come as cold comfort if you’re looking to buy on the west coast of the country. Perhaps we should all consider moving to Detroit, ranked the most affordable major market in the world.

Try and you just might get your own roadway: Blue Rodeo will soon have their own street in Riverdale, connecting Jack Layton Way to the future Bridgepoint Drive near Gerrard Street and Broadview Avenue. Fans will soon be able to get lost together on Blue Rodeo Drive, so named because of the band’s ties to the Riverdale neighbourhood. Bad timing on the announcement, maybe, as construction won’t begin until 2014, once prisoners at the Don Jail are already gone and moved to a new detention centre in Etobicoke. No word on if the honour has hit the band’s members yet. (You’re welcome.)

Comments

  • SRC

    With the news that DT has tripled its population makes old school suburbanite politicians like Rob Ford look so out of touch with what is happening. The life blood of the city is and will just get thicker is DT. Investing heavily in the suburbs, ie traffic, is just not the away to go.

    • CaligulaJones

      I think Mr. Fong should re-read “Boom, Bust and Echo”. Or at least TD should get their money back. “What happens when the Echo Boomers start having children?” was already asked and answered 20 YEARS AGO: they will move out to the suburbs. Unless you start knocking holes in condo walls.

      http://worldwidewickens.com/?p=602

      Repeat after me: downtown in your 20s, burbs in your 30s and 40s and the country in your 50s and 60s.

      And if you think your average Audi driving 50 something will give up the car, move downtown and use the subway…

      • tomwest

        People tend to move to the ‘burbs after their first of second child… with fertility rates falling, we can expect fewer echo boomers to have children – so why would they move to the suburbs?

        • CaligulaJones

          I can imagine the % of echo boomers having kids would be smaller than the boomers, sure, but not 0%. Maybe the small number of two bedroom condos will do, or, as said, knock out walls.

          But a declining birth rate there will mean even fewer downtown the next generation, no? More problems there. All those stories about condo towers becoming ghost towns might be true after all.

          And as Foot says, don’t think GTA, but how about out of the DT “core”, across the Don, in those “…1920s suburbs, especially ones close to subway stations”. I’m on the Danforth and I’m already seeing it. But they better get here quick, because if they think a $200,000 condo is hard to carry, the houses won’t convince them otherwise.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jpaterson1 James D Paterson

    Charging $2 for strollers during peak times. I’m all for this idea. On the odd times I ride a bus or streetcar, there’s always some woman who her stroller taking up two thirds of the aisle, and gives me a bad look when I bump it as I struggle to shimmy by it, which triggers a “move your ****ing stroller”.

    While I’m all for it, it’ll never pass, probably on discrimination grounds. We live in a society where the slightest eye brow raise will launch a lawsuit.

    • tyrannosaurus_rek

      If they can ban bikes during rush hour, I don’t see why they can’t ban strollers. Or ban non-collapsing strollers, or whatever.

      • Wally

        This is such a stupid distraction, strollers are a minor inconvenience when you look at what the problem actually is, that the capacity of our transit is too small for the massive amount of ridership. Instead of this useless divisive argument with people scapegoating women with strollers as the cause of transit headaches, maybe we should look at the real problem, chronic underfunding resulting in stagnating or more recently declining levels of service.
        Eliminating a couple hundred over-sized strollers is not going to change the fact that we have almost 514 million people annually trying to ride a system that doesn’t have the capacity to carry that amount.

        • dsmithhfx

          If they banned strollers they’d probably figure they could cut service even more. Shhhh, don’t tell Rob.

        • tyrannosaurus_rek

          There are a hundred things that could be changed to improve the riding experience of the average TTC user. Simply adding more vehicles won’t address all of them – certainly not the problems caused by rampant and unaddressed But I’m The Special Exception! behaviour among passengers who give no thought to the people around them.

          • Wally

            Having a child that is not walking yet and carried in a stroller is not a special exception, it is a daily reality. If there are hundreds of things that can be done why is this the only issue getting traction? I never said adding buses would be a cure-all solution, but punishing people with strollers is even less of a solution.
            I think we can all agree the real problem is the capacity of the TTC, and there are many more options than just adding buses to address that.

          • http://www.facebook.com/jpaterson1 James D Paterson

            It’s not punishment. It’s charging for extra. It happens all the time.

            When you fly, you pay for extra luggage. Some restaurants charge if you ask for ketchup, sauce, etc. Requesting a taxi van incurs an extra $10 charge on top of the meter (last time I needed a taxi van was late in 2011, and Beck told me over the phone it’d be $10 + the metered fare). Should a group of people out enjoying themselves be “punished” with a higher fee? I suppose they could avoid the taxi and just drive home drunk at 3am.

            Unfair, sure, but hardly a punishment.

          • torontothegreat

            But the strollers that are annoying aren’t strollers, they are prams.

            Also, the last 200,000 years probably prove your “daily reality” theory wrong. Strollers aren’t the only way to transport a child.

          • Wally

            so I guess we can do without buses and motor vehicles then eh?

          • http://www.facebook.com/jpaterson1 James D Paterson

            Sure, why not? I suppose people never took their child anywhere before motor vehicles were invented. Must’ve been a lot of lonely and bored people stuck inside with their child, with seemingly no way of going anywhere.

          • torontothegreat

            Absolutely, as long as you give me a plausible alternative. I can give you many when it comes to transporting your baby.

            Here, I’ll start:

            - A blanket
            - An Arm
            - Umbrella stroller
            - Baby Carrier
            - Ergonomic baby sling

            There’s 5. Now, your turn!

          • Wally

            So really this must be the biggest issue facing transit users. You seem to have devoted quite a bit of thought and taken this far too personally. IF only you fought as hard for things that actually mattered as you did for asserting your views of what is acceptable baby transportation. Again, is this really a big enough problem to demand this much attention? I say no and instead of discussing that you go off on tangents about baby transportation. Really there are bigger fish to fry and this whole trumped up issue is just hot air. In all of my years riding the TTC I have never seen anyone not able to get on because of a stroller. Does it make it awkward, sometimes. Do many things make traveling on the TTC awkward yes. Why are we only talking about this one? I have no idea but you seem to think it is really the most pressing issue facing transit riders.

          • torontothegreat

            Oh, man, do you smell that? Yup, that’s a whole lotta red herring! I had no idea it was in season? I did notice that there was an entire paragraph dedicated to this specific issue, in this specific post on this specific date though… Did you?

            “taken this far too personally”

            LOLWUT?!?

            “I say no and instead of discussing that you go off on tangents about baby transportation”

            Your the only one going on tangents dude… The rest of us are discussing the topic in today’s newstand.

          • torontothegreat

            Oh, man, do you smell that? Yup, that’s a whole lotta red herring! I had no idea it was in season? I did notice that there was an entire paragraph dedicated to this specific issue, in this specific post on this specific date though… Did you?

            “taken this far too personally”

            LOLWUT?!?

            “I say no and instead of discussing that you go off on tangents about baby transportation”

            Your the only one going on tangents dude… The rest of us are discussing the topic in today’s newstand.

          • torontothegreat

            I’m now assuming you have no plausible alternative to your ridiculous suggestion. Pity…

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            Having a non-walking child (or a giant-ass stroller) isn’t license to hold up a streetcar for a traffic light cycle while you try to drag it up the stairs, or to take two steps into the vehicle and plant yourself and force everyone to squeeze around you or wait for the next vehicle because the front is jammed.

            If you’re going to bring your kid and stroller on the TTC, the very least you could do is get a lightweight and collapsible stroller so you aren’t inconveniencing several dozen people.

            And the stroller ban idea isn’t the only one getting traction, it’s just the latest in a long line of service improvement suggestions (and will probably share the same fate).

          • andrew97

            Your argument boils down to: Children are not special, they should suck it up and learn to walk like everybody else.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            Children don’t choose where their parents are taking them, how they’ll get there, or what sort of stroller/pram/björn/etc will be used.

            It has nothing to do with children and you know it.

      • st_indrigo

        Well, because, strollers are used to carry people who can’t yet walk. Bikes, not so much. By the sounds of it, none of the commentators here have had to ride transit with an infant in a stroller. If you had, you would realize that removing the infant from the stroller, folding said stroller, and then carrying both is quite a feat, especially if you’re alone. The idea to charge extra for strollers does what, exactly? It doesn’t make the bus/subway wider. It only discourages people with kids from riding public transit. Not optional for some, and hardly equitable for anyone.

        • tyrannosaurus_rek

          Does it what what purpose a stroller serves when the effect is similar to that of a bike in the narrow aisle of a street car or bus (or older model subway)? It’s taking up space that could be occupied by a paying customer, and it’s an obstacle to everyone who gets on after it or has to get around it to disembark. And unlike a bike, it often requires a second person to lift it on and off.

          • st_indrigo

            I would say yes, it does matter, since bringing your bike on the bus/subway is optional/negotiable, whereas bringing your child with you when you go out often is not negotiable, particularly if you are a single parent. Do you also advocate banning hockey bags, any sort of luggage, golf bags, etc?

          • torontothegreat

            No, but the tool you use to carry your child is YOUR choice and its a choice you force on everyone around you. Why do you need a stroller with 3 cup holders, storage for groceries, a GPS and oh yea, as an afterthought, a small seat for your child…

          • st_indrigo

            Are there strollers that are too large for a bus–yes, absolutely. However, I use transit everyday–streetcars & subway–and every day I see people blocking doorways and preventing people from boarding/exiting, others carrying giant knapsacks and obliviously knocking seated passengers in the head/face, people crowding at the front of the streetcar when there’s practically a football field’s worth of space near the back. I could go on, but this stuff is far more prevalent than strollers. Basically, many people ignore their surroundings and act as if they’re in their own private space. The issue with strollers is negligible in comparison to the zombie-like state of most TTC riders.

          • torontothegreat

            I can tell someone with a backpack to remove it. What’s the solution to a baby stroller?

          • st_indrigo

            I’m pretty sure the solution isn’t prohibiting people with strollers from riding transit. I can tell you, as a parent, I never planned my day around pissing off transit riders by taking my kid somewhere and using a stroller to do so. Parents also aren’t responsible for stroller design–umbrella strollers are fine for an older kid, but not for an infant–and most strollers designed for infants are larger. Of course, there’s a range, but even the smallest one is larger than an umbrella stroller. In any case, you’d get more bang for your buck convincing people that their earbuds aren’t magical devices that create a force field of privacy around them or give them license to be assholes. Those riders are far more common than the stroller-wielding variety.

          • torontothegreat

            “I’m pretty sure the solution isn’t prohibiting people with strollers”

            I’m pretty sure nobody is proposing that, so we defintely agree on that one. Adding an extra 2-3 dollars for a huge stroller to your fare isn’t prohibition.

            “Parents also aren’t responsible for stroller design–umbrella strollers are fine for an older kid, but not for an infant–and most strollers designed for infants are larger. Of course, there’s a range, but even the smallest one is larger than an umbrella stroller.”

            ORly?

            http://www.strollersfornewborns.org/

            Clearly there are many, many, many many many many options for the “size” of stroller. In fact, anyone born prior to 1990 would have most likely been carted around in a farily small one. So what’s changed in 20 years? Consumerism… As far as I can see.

          • st_indrigo

            Did you check the prices on those strollers? $1000+–not likely in the budget for someone riding the bus. If you’re riding the bus with a stroller, it’s most likely because you have to, i.e., you don’t own a car. So, a stroller also needs to have storage space. Think it thru–you go to buy groceries, with your stroller–now you have a bag, 2 bags of groceries, and a stroller to push. Take a cab? Nope–need a car seat to take a cab, and you can’t lug one of those around with you. So, where does this leave the parent who needs to buy food and must take their kid with them? You’re advocating charging this person more to ride transit which, as I’ve said before, is really only a way to discourage transit use. It doesn’t make the bus/subway/streetcar bigger. Tell me again, how is this a solution?

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            The person isn’t being charged more for transit, they’re being charged more for bringing a small apartment’s worth of stuff with them.

          • st_indrigo

            So what results from charging more? How does this help? Please explain.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            The TTC recoups the lost fare of the person (or people) the stroller displaces, for one, and it encourages people to reconsider what stroller they buy/bring.

          • st_indrigo

            That’s a fallacious argument: what lost fare? What’s the scenario–person can’t get on transit due to a glut of strollers, throws their hands in the air and buys a car instead? Or, more likely, they wait for the next vehicle and pay their fare. No fare lost.

            Also, as mentioned before, infant strollers <$500 = larger strollers. For someone riding transit, spending more than $500 for a stroller just isn't an option. More often than not, the stroller is inherited or purchased second hand and the reality is most of those available 2nd hand are the cheaper, larger kind. Fewer people buy the better-designed, $1000+ strollers. So that leaves just discouraging the people who most need transit from using it.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            If they can’t board, they can’t pay. Fare lost.

            “Or, more likely, they wait for the next vehicle and pay their fare.”

            Weird how that’s called “discrimination” or “unfair” when someone suggests a be-strollered person would have to wait for the next vehicle if the current one already has a stroller aboard.

            I take transit twice a day, does that mean I don’t own anything that costs more than $500?

          • st_indrigo

            Wait a sec–I thought we were discussing an additional charge for riders w/strollers. That is what I’m objecting to. Every day I have to let a streetcar or subway pass because it’s too full. I see no reason why the same can’t be applied to people w/strollers. However, an additional charge I’m not down with. I’m not even in this situation any more–my kid can walk now–but I know what it’s like.

            And, again, it matters not on which vehicle the fare is paid, so no fare is lost. Still goes into the same revenue stream whether it’s deposited in the first bus or the last one.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            We are talking about an extra charge, that was just a pointed aside.

            Strollers are an obstruction that take up space that could be occupied by two or more other people and create blockages for people trying to get on or off or just move within the vehicle. Unlike a wheelchair they aren’t necessary, they are a choice the parent makes. Is it unfair to the parent? Maybe. But ask the 10 people left on the curb or platform if it’s fair that they can’t board because someone within has a stroller, or the person who misses their stop because she couldn’t get around the SUV in the aisle.

            (If there were some way to charge people who block the doors or don’t move into the vehicle an extra $2, I’d support that too.)

          • torontothegreat

            Price is a good point, I didn’t think to check that. But really, I think we both know there are cheap alternatives. Also worth pointing out, the bigger the stroller I’d imagine the higher the cost, which makes your point a bit questionable.

            http://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/the-first-years-jet-stroller-black/10062722?trail=SRCH%3Astroller&fromPLP=true&ancestorID=alldept&searchString=stroller&moduleName=S0011&startSearch=yes&fromSearchBox=true&addFacet=SRCH%3Astroller

            The point is: A backpack and a small stroller OR a small shopping cart and a sling OR a… Jus’ sayin’

          • st_indrigo

            Actually, it’s most often the reverse–the more expensive strollers are those that are sleek and compact. Cheaper strollers, i.e., <$500 are the larger ones. It's unfortunate, but if you want the kind of stroller you're talking about, it's a lotta ducats. Again, out of reach for most of those riding transit w/strollers. I can see the point re: accessibility, but to me this only highlights that the vehicles themselves are not designed to handle this diverse ridership. That's not the fault of the elderly, the handicapped, or parents.

          • st_indrigo

            And that Wal-Mart stroller would be fine for a toddler, but not an infant. It would also be useless in snow.

          • st_indrigo

            A good read on this.

            http://playgroundconfidential.com/2013/01/23/heres-the-thing-about-strollers-on-buses/

            Also, for the record, someone on here mentioned that it’s only guys who are advocating charging for strollers. I’m a dad, 6′ tall, 175lbs–I can carry 2 30kg sacks of cement if I need to–but I can tell you from experience that grocery shopping with a kid in a stroller, travelling via transit is many, many times more difficult than carrying the cement. If you haven’t done it, you have no idea.

          • torontothegreat

            That article comes off as a bit entitled, I’m not sure that’s the best example.

            Here’s an excerpt:

            “Or you could bring a five year old and two year old downtown for a rally supporting pay equity for midwives when you are heavily pregnant with a third baby and accidentally find yourself boarding the subway with a giant belly and a sit-and-stand stroller in the heart of rush hour”

            However, I did find this comment (while from Ottawa) seems to be the cornerstone of this entire issue in Toronto as well:

            “The unfortunate thing when this issues came up in Ottawa is that it wasn’t entitled able-bodied child free adults that were complaining about the strollers. The complaints were from people with disabilities and seniors who felt that the strollers were creating an accessibility barrier, making it impossible for them to get on or move through the bus. It was really unfortunate because the people who need to be working together to create a more accessible transit system were battling it out against each other.”

            And for that, I see the point of complaining about them.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            As I said above and below, there are many areas for improvement in the TTC experience; reducing passenger jams caused by large strollers is just one of them.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            The mode of transport and carrying the child are both optional/negotiable too.

            I’ve never seen hockey bags or luggage cause the problems of strollers (or bikes) during rush hour. Some of these strollers are more akin to store shopping carts, and nobody would think twice about banning those on the TTC.

          • CaligulaJones

            Fat people also take up too much space. Always taking up two seats. Special fare for them too?

          • http://www.facebook.com/jpaterson1 James D Paterson

            Yes.

            Airlines can charge for two seats if you’re too disgustingly fat to fit in one. Why should the TTC be different?

          • CaligulaJones

            Not disagreeing. I’ve had to stand when a stroller has blocked a seat, and when one person has sat on two seats.

            I just don’t wanna be the arbiter of “who is too fat to fit”. I have enough trouble getting through some turnstiles with a winter coat on.

          • torontothegreat

            In fact almost all airlines charge you an extra (full priced adult) ticket if your baby is not able to sit in your lap. It’s amazing how many parents (to save an adult airfare) are able to have their baby sit on their laps for hours at a time on a plane, but it’s a great injustice to ask for the same on transit?

          • Wally

            And again I think we are missing the forest for the trees. While strollers are an annoyance, they are hardly the biggest cause of discomfort or congestion on the TTC. As I said before (and no one has fully addressed still) the issue is congestion not strollers. I ride the TTC a lot and see far fewer over-sized strollers inconveniencing people than I do backpacks on people’s backs, or people who are too stupid to move back or not stand in front of doors. Should we start charging extra for that? Or ban backpacks on the TTC?
            Sure strollers are an inconvenience but is it really as big of a deal as you are making it out to be? I would say it isn’t.

          • http://www.facebook.com/jpaterson1 James D Paterson

            While you are right in that there are many issues plaguing the TTC, strollers do play a small part in congestion. When only one out of four people can get on a bus because a person and their stroller take up three (obviously I’m not using real numbers), it leads overall to further congestion.

            No, strollers are not the only thing that cause congestion, but they are a contributing factor.

            As for discomfort… I’d say yes, they are one of the bigger causes of discomfort. I hate when I get stuck next to some idiot who thinks she’s above everyone else because she has a stroller, who refuses, or doesn’t know how to apply the brakes on the stroller, allowing it to push into peoples ankles when the vehicle jerks, and then proceeds to yell at you for touching her stroller.

          • Wally

            But how often does this really happen? Not as often as the few of you are trying to make us believe.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            It doesn’t matter how often it happens. When it happens it’s a problem.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            And again you latch on to this stroller thing as if it’s the only change ever suggested in the history of the TTC and intended to cure all the problems.

            Thoughtless people who block doors can’t be fixed by tackling traffic congestion. Adding a new vehicle per hour won’t stop people from knocking over old ladies with their backpacks. Priority signalling for streetcars won’t increase platform space at St George. Getting people to stop putting their feet on seats won’t prevent track-level litter fires.

            All of these things need to be addressed in their own way.

            Banning strollers is one way of addressing one problem.

          • Wally

            I didn’t latch onto anything, that is what the paragraph is about and that is what everyone has commented about. I was simply responding. I feel the strollers are being unfairly singled out and banning strollers is a completely arbitrary and unrealistic option. I feel a lot of this is motivated by some level of resentment either to children or women, but it appears those against strollers are almost entirely male in this comment section.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            Of course you’ve latched onto it, utterly excising it from the greater transit context so you can claim it’s the only issue people believe matters and the solution (banning strollers) the only idea with traction. It isn’t. It’s one of many. Stick around Torontoist and you’ll see another two TTC-related proposed changes posted by the end of the month, if not the week.

            “I feel a lot of this is motivated by some level of resentment either to children or women…”

            I feel your ad hominem betrays a lack of rational foundation for your argument in favour of giving each freeloading SUV-sized stroller the same rights as two paying adults.

            “…it appears those against strollers are almost entirely male in this comment section.”

            I’d love to know how you figured out everyone’s gender.

          • torontothegreat

            “banning strollers is a completely arbitrary and unrealistic option”

            “impose a $2 charge per stroller and limit the number allowed on buses during peak hours”

            I hope that clears that up for you…

            “but it appears those against strollers are almost entirely male in this comment section.”

            Excuse me?

          • CaligulaJones

            Well, Wally, I ride the subway EVERY DAY, so I KNOW how many #@$% irritating idiots are. One lazy ass standing at a door blocks a whole lane of people getting off, making the train late. I’ve perfected the “backpack push”, cluing in the clueless. I see non-guide dogs and bikes during rush hour regularly.

            The difference is, you don’t know that idiots are going to be idiots. You do know that a SUV-oller will be a pain.

            (That said, if you are on a bus, you probably need to be on a bus, especially if you have a kid with you. I have no problem with cutting the needy slack. Its the wanty I have a problem with).

          • CaligulaJones

            Well, Wally, I ride the subway EVERY DAY, so I KNOW how many #@$% irritating idiots are. One lazy ass standing at a door blocks a whole lane of people getting off, making the train late. I’ve perfected the “backpack push”, cluing in the clueless. I see non-guide dogs and bikes during rush hour regularly.

            The difference is, you don’t know that idiots are going to be idiots. You do know that a SUV-oller will be a pain.

            (That said, if you are on a bus, you probably need to be on a bus, especially if you have a kid with you. I have no problem with cutting the needy slack. Its the wanty I have a problem with).

          • torontothegreat

            Fix nothing until everything is fixed! How’s that working out for ya?

          • torontothegreat

            Absolutely, airlines already do this.

    • torontothegreat

      Not sure if it’s still like this, but in NYC apparently they would only allow you to take transit if your stroller wasn’t collapsible.

      The problem is that strollers have gotten a lot bigger, they have cargo room, cup holders, shopping space oh and a seat for a child :P

      The other problem that I constantly see is that people with these hummer strollers will get on the bus and stop right in front of the wheel well leaving no space for other passengers to get on the bus. Try to say “excuse me” and you’ll often just be ignored or told to f off.

  • David

    Whatever happened to umbrella strollers? Perfect for the TTC.

    • http://www.facebook.com/jpaterson1 James D Paterson

      It’s hard to have an umbrella stroller when people feel the need to have a cup holder, pen holder, phone holder, and somewhere to store their iPad and laptop, naturally.