Today Thu Fri
It is forecast to be Mostly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on July 23, 2014
Mostly Cloudy
21°/14°
It is forecast to be Partly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on July 24, 2014
Partly Cloudy
22°/13°
It is forecast to be Partly Cloudy at 11:00 PM EDT on July 25, 2014
Partly Cloudy
24°/16°

40 Comments

news

Front and Spadina May Get a Giant New Shopping Mall, at Some Point

Nothing's finalized yet, but reports indicate that a big, "high-end" shopping centre may be on the way.

The Globe's current offices. Palatial, they are not. Photo by {a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mariocardoso/4929348944/"}Mario Cardoso{/a}, from the {a href="http://www.flickr.com/groups/torontoist/pool/"}Torontoist Flickr Pool{/a}.

The intersection of Front Street and Spadina Avenue may be home to a massive new shopping mall when developers are done with the site of the Globe and Mail‘s soon-to-be-former offices.

Business News Network, citing “a source familiar with the development” is reporting that Riocan and Allied Properties, two giant real-estate investment trusts, are in joint negotiations to buy the Globe‘s existing offices at < a href="https://maps.google.com/maps?q=The+Globe+and+Mail,+Front+Street+West,+Toronto,+ON,+Canada&hl=en&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=57.42297,135.263672&oq=the+globe+and+mail,&hnear=The+Globe+and+Mail,+444+Front+St+W,+Toronto,+Toronto+Division,+Ontario+M5V+2S9,+Canada&t=m&z=15&iwloc=A">444 Front Street West and build in their place a “mini Eaton Centre,” with about 500,000 square feet of high-end retail space.

Assuming 500,000 is close to the real figure, “mini Eaton Centre” wouldn’t be too much of an exaggeration. The centre has about 1.6 million square feet of retail space, but 816,000 of that is Sears.

Neither Riocan nor Allied Properties immediately returned phone messages, but the Globe itself has reported that the two companies have been trying, jointly, to buy the paper’s property ever since a deal with another developer, Mattamy Homes, fell through. The development would include office space. BNN reports that there is also talk of adding a boutique hotel.

The deal would be part of the Globe and Mail‘s ongoing effort to vacate its existing offices and move into a shiny, yet-to-be-built 18-storey building on an adjacent plot of land.

Even if the sale goes through, the developers would need to navigate a complex zoning and planning approvals process before putting shovels in the ground. Projects like this usually take years to realize, and sometimes they never get built at all.

Comments

  • Anonymous

    So they’re closing the Globe? Yay!

    • http://darylfritz.com Daryl Fritz
    • vampchick21

      Reading good.

      • Anonymous

        Reading bullshit, bad

        • vampchick21

          I was referring to reading comprehension, since it states right in this article that the Globe is moving offices, not shutting down. As for your opinion on the Globe, I couldn’t care less.

          • Anonymous

            Yes, it was sarcasm. You obviously missed that. And as to my opinion, you DO care, because you replied. Believe me, honey, I’ve had a lot more edumacation than you have, and in something more complex than reading simple news articles. Lighten up.

          • vampchick21

            Yeah, cause the comments section of an internet blog tell you everything you need to know about the background, education and intelligence of another human being behind a screenname. You so smart! S.M.R.T!

          • Anonymous

            Sit on my lap. I’ll tell you a story.

          • Anonymous

            So you’re a dickhead on crack. Congratulations.

          • Anonymous

            Your mother is so dry, her crabs carry canteens. Go fuck yer hat.

          • Anonymous

            Your mother is so dry, Death Valley pales in comparison. Go read some books.

          • Anonymous

            Your name is Neville? No wonder you hang out at shopping malls.

          • vampchick21

            Pervert.

          • Anonymous

            Awwww. Thank you.

          • Anonymous

            ” I’ve had a lot more edumacation than you have”

            Interesting. An intelligent person would never say something so foolish, honey.

  • Phillip

    Toronto doesn’t need more shopping malls. The Eaton’s Centre was a mistake, and this will be too. Malls take people off of the streets and makes for much less vibrant communities.

    • Anonymous

      Like we need another Etobicoke.

    • Anonymous

      How was the Eaton Centre a mistake? It’s a major, maybe the major, tourist attraction for the city.

      • Anonymous

        For a city of nearly 6 million people to have a shopping mall as their major attraction, is quite foolish. Second, the company itself went tits-up.

        I don’t know about you, but I’m born and raised in Toronto. The vast majority of Torontonians are not from here. In order to succeed, we can’t have the top tourist attraction, a shopping mall where foreign companies have stores. That’s not an attraction at all.

        As many old school Torontonians say, no self-respecting Torontonian would be caught on Yonge Street. Dundas Square is a complete farce.

        • Anonymous

          Firstly, Eaton’s went tits up, Cadillac Fairview did not. Secondly, Toronto is a little under three million, not pushing six. Thirdly, our population doesn’t matter because we’re talking about tourists. Fourth, your native snobbery is irrelevant – it’s a tourist attraction because tourists go there, so build a bridge and get over it. Fifth, it doesn’t matter if it’s a mall, a casino, a tower, a Ferris wheel, or a cyclotron, a tourist attraction will always be pooh-poohed by locals. And finally, we are succeeding with a mall as our top attraction,

          • Anonymous

            Toronto is indeed pushing six. People don’t come to Toronto to see Mississauga, Richmond Hill, Etobicoke or Scarborough. People also don’t come to see Cadillac Fairview buildings. Thirdly, it’s the population that makes Toronto a city, not its American retail stores pushing Gangnam handbags.

            If you can actually get out of this little bubble, you’ll see why other cities are actually attractions. Your insight is that a frickin shopping mall is an attraction? Are you frickin kidding me? You deserve to be in Etobicoke.

            Welcome to Toronto. Are you over the bright lights and big buildings yet? Apparently not. I’m sure you’re amazed by the breakdancers as well.

          • Anonymous

            Toronto is not pushing six million, the GTA as a whole is – you excluded it the next sentence as irrelevant to tourists, which is what I said in the first place.

            You might be one of a handful of born-and-raised Torontonians, but you’re acting like a yokel. You’d replace the Eaton Centre with what, a theme park? Retail tourism is inseparable from destination tourism for some of the most popular urban tourist destinations in the world – New York, Dubai, Paris, Milan, Tokyo. And we can’t overlook regional retail tourism – people do travel to buy what they can’t get back home, cross borders to take advantage of exchange rates/taxes (Buffalo’s tourism page prominently features shopping for Canadian visitors) and to shop in big-deal famous places (ever heard of Macy’s? Rodeo Drive? Harrod’s?). Your opinion of retail tourism is decades out of touch with the realities of the global tourism industry.

            (Oh, and I lived in a city of over 10 million – over 20 million in the metro area – before I set foot in Toronto for the first time.)

          • Anonymous

            Newsflash: GTA is Toronto. Maybe you missed the amalgamation. You’re acting like a bumpkin. To say that people should come to Toronto go go shopping, where they can replicate that experience anywhere, means there is no attraction in Toronto. People don’t go to Tokyo for shopping. People are not going to fly into Toronto to get a worse exchange rate. Our top tourist group are Americans. They’re not coming to Toronto to buy handbags. My family has over 300 years experience in such a location. Toronto doesn’t have anything close to any of the stores you mention, because none of them are Canadian. Not a single one. Nothing offered in Toronto or Canada for that matter is an attraction because it’s unique. They are just duplicates of the same stores that actually originate elsewhere. Retail tourism is the attraction of Toronto? Are you kidding me?

            It’s no wonder Canada is laughed at. Because people like you are enthralled with going out to the movies. How exciting. A night out with Shrek. Yay Canada.

          • Smart Rico

            Amalgamation had nothing to do with the GTA, fool. The former 6 cities of Metro Toronto, which included: Toronto, Scarborough, York, East York, North York and Etobicoke were merged in 1998 and became the “new” City of Toronto. The GTA is a term used to refer to the new City of Toronto and the suburban region. It is not a political boundary. It is not Toronto.

          • Anonymous

            Toronto as a city does indeed carry all the effect of the whole Golden Horseshoe, no less than Queen’s is part of New York.

          • Smart rico

            Wrong again. Queens is a former municipality that was merged with manhattan along with Brooklyn, the Bronx and Staten Island to become New York City. Queens is to New York what Scarborough is to Toronto. Golden Horseshoe is Toronto and surrounding areas, namely the area to niagara, which happens to form a horseshoe shape. Stop being a fool

          • Anonymous

            Right again. Manhattan is what people fly to New York to see. Please read the thread. Shopping in downtown Toronto, isn’t anything unique whatsoever. Toronto doesn’t offer anything unique nor close to what any other truly international city does. But the problem still lies amongst the bumpkins that come to Toronto and think they are movie stars. Ya, well, nothing new. Every Toronto import thinks they are a star. The Eaton Centre was a bizarre downtown entity when it began.

            The people that think Toronto is an International city, obviously have a vast need for definition. Those that have little international travel, absolutely no definition, and limited time experiencing Toronto as just the “local-deprived” experience that it is.

            Anything in the local population is a complete addition to why people would seriously consider Toronto a destination. The first single attraction that I could say, is Niagara Falls, well outside any region around Toronto. It’s a true attraction. Shit, they are closer to cheaper shopping than we are in Toronto. So, stop being a fucking moron.

          • Smart Rico

            Ok, now everything you just said is right (except the part about me being a moron). Toronto, the actual city, and the downtown, are pretty boring. I also remember growing up and hearing about how clean it was. I don’t know what people consider clean, other than the financial district, a lot of the shopping streets are pretty dumpy. I’m sure we can agree on that!

          • Anonymous

            The city used to be pretty clean, but I started noticing how bad it was getting sometime around the end of Lastman’s term or the start of Miller’s.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t even know where to start with you. Your reading comprehension skills are an embarrassment to the TDSB, and the equivocation job you’re doing on everything makes it impossible to continue without holding your hand and showing you where you keep making mistakes.

          • Anonymous

            What the hell are you talking about? Your humour blows dirty goats.

          • Anonymous

            And your late mother smelled of elderberries, but I digress on that point.

    • vampchick21

      Tell that to Yonge Street, Queen Street and Dundas Street. What is true in small towns and suburbs is not true for major urban centres.

    • http://twitter.com/torontomyway Toronto My Way

      See comments/conversation from this Toronto Standard article http://torontostandard.com/the-sprawl/a-mini-eatons-centre-to-come-to-king-east

  • OgtheDIm

    500K square feet of upscale in a place where it is difficult to park and not exactly amenity friendly?!?!

  • Turd Ferguson

    I work in the area and traffic is already ridiculous on daily basis. Unless there is a plan to alleviate some of the excess traffic… Both Front and Wellington west of Spadina are not built to handle the excess traffic that will surely come with such a development.

    • Anonymous

      No downtown streets were built with today’s volume of traffic in mind. The city needs a comprehensive plan for taking cars off downtown streets, no matter how many First World Problems it causes.

  • John Duncan

    Isn’t this site where Metrolinx wants to build the Union Relief Station? That’s a much more important and needed project than another mall. As the Union renos show, they’re not mutually exclusive, but should be planned for before development starts.

    • Anonymous

      Such a plan would have worked a long time ago before all of these condos were built, but with all of the land taken up for these things, I wouldn’t be too sure.

  • a clark

    Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!