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In the G20′s Wake, Protesters Take Back Toronto’s Streets

What a difference a costume change can make. As police lined the front of the Toronto Police Headquarters at 40 College Street on Monday at 5:30 p.m. to face the Toronto Community Mobilization Network’s Jail Solidarity Rally across the street, they had shed the riot gear, masks, and weaponry of the weekend for casual police uniforms and cycling helmets. Instead of shields, all that they put between themselves and the more than one thousand protesters were their bicycles. And the protesters, while vocal and emotional, brushed past the rows of cops without so much as a nudge in their direction. It was just the way you’d think of a peaceful protest in a democratic city—a folk singer even busted out an acoustic guitar and the crowd joined in on “One Love” and “Give Peace a Chance.”


It was how the weekend of the G20 summit in Toronto could have been. There were police in riot gear behind the station and backup forces along the perimeter, but they remained distant and inactive. There was no violence or destruction. The “kettling” of Sunday night was abandoned, with everyone free to come and go as they pleased.
The sad thing on Monday night was not the way in which that evening’s protest unfolded—peacefully and with cooperation between police and pedestrians, who walked only steps away from one another as the rally became a march down University Avenue towards City Hall. Rather, it was that the rally only existed because of the arrests, in the wake of a number of instances of heavy-handed police force and apparent human rights violations over the weekend before. The protest also sought to shed light on the multitude of people who were still being held as of Monday evening as part of the largest number of mass arrests in Canadian history.
“I’m not usually a rally speaker,” an emotional Naomi Klein told the amassed crowd gathered on the street between Bay and Yonge, which police had blocked from traffic. “But I’m pissed off about what is happening in my city.” And make no mistake, so was the audience—shouts and chants from the amateurish “Shame!” to the more pragmatic “Whose streets? Our streets!” went up throughout the throng of people. But the outrage at what many had endured over the previous few days was also contained, as protesters chanted their frustrations but made no sign of antagonism towards the rows of cops facing them.
The speeches were short but powerful, ranging from Judy Rebick’s chronicle of the power of protest to anecdotes from a series of activists and organizers who were arrested and held over the Friday to Sunday arc. Their stories reiterated those that have emerged since the weekend but that politicians have skirted—details such as police refusing to released an identified minor, not informing individuals of the charges levied against them after arrest, denying access to legal support, refusing to allow detainees access to their medication or feminine hygiene products, and subjecting women to strip searches by male officers.
Once the speeches concluded, police directed the group west, pioneering a march down University toward City Hall and circling back to Queen’s Park. The mass of people making their way just south from the legislature building at College and University was in such contrast to the scene I witnessed there only two days ago that it was hard to believe such a short period of time had elapsed. People were laughing and singing, while some marchers played saxophones and others drummed and danced. Enormous peace flags were in the air, and the police, though following the march at every step, remained unaggressive and restrained. “This is what democracy looks like!” the crowd chanted, and they were right. What Toronto resembled over the past weekend, however, was something else entirely.
Photos by Andrew Louis/Torontoist.

Comments

  • http://undefined David

    “This is what democracy looks like!” the crowd chanted, and they were right. What Toronto resembled over the past weekend, however, was something else entirely.
    ===
    Well said. I talked to one of the officers watching the crowd last night, he seemed cool and him and the group of officers watching thought this was fine.
    Many lessons to be learned, on all sides, about what went wrong on Saturday and Sunday.

  • http://undefined rek

    (From the Globe mass arrest article)

    Chief Bill Blair said Monday that the incident happened after police arrested “dozens and dozens” of anarchists with Molotov cocktails and other weapons who were heading to a demonstration on Sunday. However, he said some trouble-makers melted into the rolling protest.

    “Unfortunately, their criminal activity was made a lot easier by the complicity of the crowd,” he told CP24. “And so we had to contain and control the crowd in an effort to control those criminals.”

    He said the protesters “had roamed and ranged back and forth across the city in an effort to spread out our resources” to create opportunities for trouble makers to “attack the vulnerabilities of the city.”

    Yes, blame the people exercising their right to protest and the people just walking through their neighbourhood for your incompetence and the inflexible thinking of your field leaders. How many windows were smashed while police stood by and did nothing? How did 4 cars get trashed and burned, over several hours, without any attempt to arrest the people in the act? Why wait hours, or until the next day to clamp down on the group responsible — only once they’d made themselves indistinguishable from the rest of the people on the street, or fled the scene entirely?
    You blew it, Blair.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    You know what, rek? I am completely on side with everything you said here.

  • http://undefined torontothegreat

    Don’t get mad at Blair he’s a person too, with a family and stuff…

  • http://www.realjohnson.com TheRealJohnson

    Because I love to promote conspiracy theories:
    I have heard a not-that-crazy rumour that those cars were abandoned and left as targets intentionally. The reason police did nothing (so the theory goes) is so that vandals would have a target and would thus ignore shop windows. Another element of this story is that police knew the cars would be burned, would thus make the news and would thus justify ridiculous security spending, etc. A friend of a friend (told you: conspiracy theory)has said that the cars were totally stripped inside before vandals got to them (no radio etc).
    Anyway, that’s the conspiracy theory for consideration.
    In response to this story: Love the way we come together in a time of crisis Toronto! Now can we please just go back to ignoring/shoving each other on the TTC like normal?

  • http://undefined elliot

    Exactly.

  • http://undefined friend68

    Hey, if someone brazenly smashes windows and sets cars on fire, then stands in a group of legitimate protesters so hey can shed his disguise, and they simply provide him that cover, without so much as moving away, or making it clear that he is NOT one of their own, I would opine that is safely called complicity.
    And are you saying that the police should have charged into the middle of the most volatile situation of the weekend and attempted to make arrests then and there? They waited for the purpose of restraint and safety.

  • http://undefined Dave

    Perhaps the right to assemble, press freedom and other human rights are more precious that any broken window and cruiser.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    Well, except for this.
    (Credit given to Michael Chrisman for pointing this out on Sunday.)

  • http://undefined davedave

    “How did 4 cars get trashed and burned, over several hours, without any attempt to arrest the people in the act?”
    Yeah, a bunch of cops should have rushed into a volatile situation to tackle a car jumper guy and then have the crowd turn on them. Brilliant strategy there. You should be chief of police.

  • http://undefined Gary

    Friend68: a small number of people committed relatively minor crimes (vandalism) and then hid amongst a crowd of thousands–and to you, this immediately makes all those thousands of people suddenly complicit and subject to arrest? Ridiculous. Would you try to forcibly apprehend a criminal in the midst of a rampage? Those who stood by and took photos are being criticized, but those same photos are now the primary evidence being used to arrest and convict those hooligans.
    In my eyes the police–for whatever reason–failed to apprehend this small number of criminals on Saturday and then overcompensated by cracking down on hundreds of other peaceful protesters and innocent bystanders on Saturday night at the Novotel, and then all day Sunday across the city. Hundreds and hundreds of people were illegally searched, intimidated, insulted, assaulted, detained, humiliated, and kept in cages for 20+ hours before being released without charges. Many were subject to this traumatizing treatment simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time: some were simply walking their dogs or shopping in their own neighbourhoods many blocks away from the G20 security fence. If this does not disturb you as a Canadian then I think you need to question your values.
    All many of us are asking is that the police be subjected to a reasonable impartial inquiry that asks them to explain and justify their behaviour instead of hiding behind a wall of convoluted evasive statements, half-truths, and proven outright lies. This sounds perfectly reasonable to me, and I resent being labeled as some sort of radical leftist for voicing this opinion.
    The police are human, but they have also been given enormous powers over the rest of us and are extremely well-compensated to do their jobs; with overtime, some police officers were earning over $1000 per day during the G20. Like any of us, they should be held accountable for any mistakes they made. They had the power, now comes the responsibility.

  • http://undefined munzz

    Davedave you are too naive.
    Naomi Klein on DemocracyNOW:
    They said, “If you want security, this is what it costs.” So, before the summit started, there was a public opinion poll that was conducted that found that 78 percent of Canadians believed that the cost was unjustified.
    Now, while that was happening, media outlets were getting press statements. And I’ll just read you one. This is from the Toronto Police Department: “All you have to do is turn on the TV and see what’s happening now. Police cars are getting torched, buildings are being vandalized, people are getting beat up, and [so] the so-called ‘intimidating’ police presence is essential to restoring order.” In other words, the police were playing public relations, overtly. They were saying, “OK, you’re telling us our price tag was too high. We’re getting in political trouble for our outrageous demands. So now we’re going to show you this huge threat that we’re up against.” And so, we have a police commissioner named Julian Fantino, who’s now started to talk about activists as organized crime. He says it’s not enough to call them thugs, they’re organized criminals. So, what’s dangerous here is that in order to justify their own unjustifiable actions, they need to overinflated a threat.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    Or, I suppose, this one with (a working laptop in the background), this one (with the working radio and horn), or this one (where the equipment is just set afire).

  • http://undefined lunarworks

    There is no single group without blame for the shit that went down on Saturday and Sunday.
    The Black Bloc – 100% Pure Morons.
    The Police – Saturday’s strategy was inaction, Sunday’s strategy was overreaction. Protecting the precious fences was the ISU’s primary mission.
    The “Peaceful” Protesters – The protesters did nothing to stop the violence, and the protest leaders bluntly refused to condemn the violence and actually implicitly approved it.
    The Government – Harper knew this would happen, and chose to put it here anyway, putting aside the city’s suggestion to hold it at the Exhibition Grounds.
    The Innocent Bystanders – Yes, getting arrested sucks, and I *am* on your side… but honestly, you should have known what you were getting into when going into a riot zone to gawk.

  • http://undefined thelemur

    I’m not sure that theory can be squared with this:
    http://www.mefeedia.com/watch/31745792

  • http://undefined CanadianSkeezix

    Rek, very well said.
    Friend68, what you said is ridiculous. Gary summed up my thoughts nicely.

  • http://undefined davedave

    tin foil hattery
    the truth lies in the middle
    The cops aren’t going to do press releases about anything other than f’ing police actions
    Go picket CP24 and CBC for going OJ on it.

  • Mark Ostler

    Which “peaceful protesters” are you talking about? Because the vast majority of protesters, including the major groups like Greenpeace, various unions, Oxfam, etc. had left the southern downtown core well before all of the smashing/arson took place. These groups never stopped marching, never paused at Queen and Spadina, just turned north on Spadina and kept on going. They weren’t anywhere near any of the violence, so why should they bear any of the blame for what happened and how could they have done anything to stop it?
    If you’re talking about the Toronto Community Mobilization Network and others like John Clarke of OCAP, then yes, I agree that they haven’t distanced themselves from the violence that occurred and some of their members were likely in the area of the violence. But even they represent a small percentage of the actual protesters.

  • http://undefined CanadianSkeezix

    lunarworks, there is no one group called “protesters”. While there were some douchebags who refused to condemn the violence, arguing it constituted some sort of expression, there were thousands who simply wanted to protest peacefully and a number of groups did speak out against violent protest. And I’m not even sure what to make out of your comment that they “did nothing to stop the violence” — are you saying that they all ought to have risked injury by attempting citizen arrests?
    And you don’t sound like you are in any way “on the side” of innocent bystanders. Many were there protesting peacefully. Some were journalists. Many lived in the area — there is a great piece in this morning’s Globe about people being hauled off by the cops for walking their dogs, buying groceries, etc. Even if they did come to gawk (and I’m sure many did), that in no way justifies (as Gary put it above) being “illegally searched, intimidated, insulted, assaulted, detained, humiliated, and kept in cages for 20+ hours before being released without charges”. This is a free and democratic society — nobody ought “to have known” better than to step out into the public thoroughfare.

  • little_potato

    Citizen’s arrests? After what happened to the supermarket owner, who would dare to make citizen’s arrests??

  • http://undefined lunarworks

    By “peaceful” protesters I mean the blowhards. (I put “peaceful” in quotations, but I should have been more clear.)
    I saw interviews on TV with the leaders of a few organizations, and whenever they were asked about their opinion on violence, they just minced words or changed the subject. They hate the big corporations nearly as much as the anarchists, and the saying goes “The enemy of my enemy is my friend”. Plus, letting the anarchists do the dirty work allows them to keep the moral high ground.
    Also, I saw videos with people shoving and ripping the face masks off of solitary black bloc members, who immediately ran off to cover their faces like the cowards they are. If more people had done that, they could have been dealt with better.
    Oh, and I completely agree that the cops treated the bystanders horribly. There needs to be an investigation into the matter. The whole situation was contemptible, and there is no justification. But they still put themselves in the midst of irrational protesters and cops who apparently couldn’t tell the difference between them.
    It’s like if there’s a hurricane coming through town. You have no control over the situation. You don’t step outside and say “Fuck you, hurricane! These are public streets and I’m free to walk down them!” You stay in and deal with the inconvenience, knowing it’s gonna be gone tomorrow, or you go outside and deal with the possible consequences. Your decision. Yes, it sucks, but again, you have no control over the situation.

  • little_potato

    Even on Monday the police were searching people wearing black clothes and “suggesting” that they leave. I’m sure if they had not done that there would be even more people on Monday.

  • http://undefined friend68

    I was not at all trying to suggest that those around the black bloc group should be subject to arrest, nor was I suggesting that they attempt to forcibly detain them. I am more of the opinion that doing nothing at all, not even speaking against their actions for the most part, before or after, gives some basis to explain the difficulties and frustrations faced by the police.
    There seems to be an attitude that the police had to do everything (protect all property and peace, arrest all those breaking the laws immediately, all without interfering in any way with those around them) while absolutely nothing is expected of those taunting, baiting and assaulting the police.
    I agree that rights and freedoms are far more important that any window or cruiser — which is surely why, in addition to the safety of their offices, the police made the decisions to sacrifice the cruiser.
    I don’t think the right to assemble should be set aside for a cruiser, but I do think it was reasonable, especially after Saturday, to have it limited in some cases or places where there was a credible threat of violence or harm to people.
    Maybe that opinion is ridiculous, but I’ve read worse.

  • http://undefined g026r

    I missed the supermarket owner story. Got a link?

  • http://undefined Mr. Palmer

    I love this “don’t get mad at the cops, they’re people with families” BS, maybe they should have thought about those families when they were beating up 15yo girls and telling them they’d be raped and gangbanged or otherwise intimidating people who could just as well be their sons, daughters or brothers and sisters.

  • http://undefined CanadianSkeezix

    lunarworks, your are talking out of both sides of your mouth. In one breath you say the situation was contemptible and that there ought to be an investigation, but then you still blame the victims of the sweep. Which is it?
    Your hurricane comparison doesn’t make much sense — this wasn’t a uncontrollable force of nature, but rather a man-made situation that was very much within our control as a society. The whole point of civil liberties is that one is not unreasonably and unlawfully deprived of one’s freedoms — the police should be there protecting bystanders, not arresting everything that moves. There are reports of police charging/boxing-in peaceful crowds. These people put themselves in the path of harm only to the extent that they believed that the police were bound by the law as much as they were enforcing it. To suggest that people should behave as though there was a hurricane completely misses the point. In a free country, people should be free to step outside, to protest, and to observe. In a dangerous situation, police may need to step in, even order people to move away, possibly even question bystanders — but that doesn’t mean that the police can they unlawfully detain and arrest anyone they want. And to suggest that people should suffer the “inconvenience” of hiding behind locked doors seems to miss the very point of what it means to live in a free country.
    And while I agree with your point about the “blowhards”, distinguishing this small group of idiots goes against your earlier point that everyone shared blame. And your suggestion that more people ought to have physically challenged members of the Black Bloc, thus risking injury and further violence, is just baffling.

  • http://undefined CanadianSkeezix

    And of course by “your talking”, I meant “you’re talking”.

  • http://undefined CanadianSkeezix

    Friend68, that’s very different from what you posted above, where you did say that the crowds were complicit. As that’s not what you meant to say then, the the clarification is appreciated.
    I’m not sure that there is any general attitude, outside of the small group of discredited “activitists” like TCMN, that “absolutely nothing is expected of those taunting, baiting and assaulting the police”. I think most people think that the vandals and those that commit assault should be arrested. I think that most people also believe that the police ought not to be taunting, baiting and assaulting citizens, which appears to have been what a number of them were doing.
    And, of course, police sometimes need to interfere with the right to assemble. I think the anger and concern stems from the fact that police acted completely out of proportion to whatever threat of violence or harm to people they perceived on Sunday.

  • http://undefined lunarworks

    (Before I start, let me again clarify that I was and am disgusted by the display the police put on on Sunday.)
    I’m talking out of two sides of my mouth? Your problem is that you (and many others) see the whole issue as black and white. It’s not.
    Here’s how you see it:
    Cops – Inexcusable Behaviour
    Bystanders – Completely Blameless
    Here’s how I see it:
    Cops – Inexcusable Behaviour
    Bystanders – Bad Judgment of the Situation
    If you think you can go out into a tense protest scene, and both the cops and protesters are gonna stop what they’re doing, step aside, and say “Oops, sorry about that, please go on through” like some Monty Python routine, you’re dreaming. It’s a nice dream, but it’s still a dream.
    And yes, cops vs protesters IS like a force of nature, man-made or not. Two stubborn, opposing fronts that clash against each other.
    Also, let’s go out on a limb here and try to see it from the perspective of the police: You’re trying to contain and clear-out a potentially violent protest. Despite multiple recommendations that they stay out of the area, and a clear display of danger, locals keep walking into the scene to hang out and see what’s going on. They’re mixed in with the protesters, and you can’t tell them apart. They’re making the situation a whole lot harder to manage, and you’re already stressed out by two days of this shit, so you just pen everyone in and sort them out later.
    Nothing is black and white.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    Yes, because every single police officer on duty that day — both women and men — was “beating up 15yo girls and telling them they’d be raped and gangbanged.” For sure.
    Comments like this don’t help anyone — not the victims who were abused, threatened, and/or harassed; not the demonstrators who weren’t complicit in all the riot activity; not those street-uniformed officers who were overwhelmed when they got bum-rushed; and not the civil discussion we’re all trying to get through right now. Grow up.

  • http://undefined Mr. Palmer

    I didn’t say every cop did that, does it make a difference that it was just a few? I certainly don’t think so. Also, I didn’t come up those words, they were said by some officers, I agree that they’re not helpful comments. I wish they’d never been uttered.

  • http://undefined CanadianSkeezix

    lunarworks, I am not sure how familiar you are with Canadian law. Police can’t legally “pen everyone in and sort them out later” just because they’re “stressed”. There’s seeing it from the perspective of the police, as you suggest, but there is also understanding what is legal and what is not. And from all reports, police were making no efforts whatsoever to “tell them apart” – to use your words – and that’s the whole bloody issue. While police are entitled to take control of a situation, using lawful means, police in this case reportedly took a relatively calm situation and made it awful, using tactics that were no way commensurate with the threat. You seem to bizarrely want to blame people who were lawfully present because they should have known better than to think they lived in a free country where they could protest peacefully, report on the news or just go out and buy groceries. None of these people stepped into the middle of a fire-fight in Mogadishu, for christsake. They stepped out onto Spadina Avenue, into what was from all accounts a peaceful and controlled situation until the police commenced their boxing-in tactics, in free and democratic Toronto.
    According to you, being at Queen and Spadina means that those people are partially to blame for being illegally searched. Being at Queen and Spadina means that they are partially to blame for being illegally detained and denied right to counsel. Being at Queen and Spadina means that they are partially to blame for being strip-searched in a detention centre, without even being charged with an offence. Being at Queen and Spadina means that they are partially to blame for being, in some causes, assaulted and humiliated. Really? In Canada, people deserve that treatment because they were availing themselves of their goddamn civil rights?
    According to our theory of the world, everyone would have to huddle behind closed doors everytime there was any risk of unrest, just like in some military disctatorship. Otherwise, they are partially to blame for whatever happens to them.
    Your posts suggest that you are not that familiar with what is meant by civil rights and rule of law, why they are important, and why people should not be scolded for expecting police to respect them.

  • http://undefined lunarworks

    Again, I am NOT excusing the cops or their tactics. I am just reasserting my belief that when willfully wandering into a known trouble zone sometimes you have to take at least some level of personal responsibility for whatever happens.
    I know civil rights are important, but I also know cool heads do not always reign in the middle of a tense protest situation. I’m sure you’ve gotten into a fight with a sibling (if you have one) where all logic goes out the window and emotions rule. As for telling the protesters apart from the bystanders, who were all mingling together, how do you suggest the police tell them apart? (Yes, they should have given better warnings to disperse, rather than boxing in…)
    Also, if you needed groceries, I have news for you (I know, it’s a bit late): Only a few major roads and major intersections had trouble. Every other street was free to roam. Find a way to the grocery store that doesn’t involve passing through a protest zone. Oh, but you’d rather take the street that has been all over the news the past two days flooded with cops and other assorted lunatics… good plan.
    To be absolutely honest, even I considered going downtown to observe the mess. Yes, I knew it was completely within my rights to go, but I also knew that if I got caught up in a bad situation it would be partially because I put myself there. (With rights come responsibilities.) We can all argue all we want that it shouldn’t have been happening at all, and we’d be completely right, but it doesn’t change the fact that it WAS happening.
    Yesterday’s protest was ideal. The cops were all friendly and smiling, the protesters were peaceful, and nothing bad happened. The anarchists had fled town, back to whatever damp basement they’re living in, no one tried anything stupid, and the ISU had dissolved because their crazed mission to protect “the fence” was over. Things generally work that way here. I’ve been in a bunch of protests without any problems whatsoever. Saturday and Sunday was a bizarre anomaly forced upon us by that ass Harper.

  • http://www.realjohnson.com TheRealJohnson

    OK OK, theory quashed. Sheesh. But I’m sure you’re all aware that Nostradamus predicted this right…

  • thelemur
  • http://undefined uskyscraper

    The big change Monday was not what the police were wearing, it was the lack of tourist vandals in the crowd. Had an imaginary wall gone up around the city over the weekend and only locals participated in the protests, I suspect all of the marches would have been like this. I definitely subscribe to the Quebec/Euro-instigator theory – these professional “protesting” idiots were the ones that ruined everything for everyone.

  • http://undefined rek

    “Hey, if someone brazenly smashes windows and sets cars on fire, then stands in a group of legitimate protesters so hey can shed his disguise, and they simply provide him that cover, without so much as moving away, or making it clear that he is NOT one of their own, I would opine that is safely called complicity.”
    It’s possible to stand next to a guy shucking his black clothes and not notice because all of your attention is elsewhere. Individuals in a group being aware of something doesn’t mean the whole group is aware, or that they’ll react the same way, or even think to react.
    For a lot of Torontonians, Saturday was the first time they’d even heard of the black bloc.

  • http://undefined rek

    I was at Queen and Spadina on Saturday when the cruisers windshields were first shattered. In addition to the 5 or 6 guys wailing on the cars, there were only about 50 people (half of them holding cameras) in the area. The ISU dispersed as many people Saturday night (when the car was into its second hour of burning) and easily contained five to ten times as many people at the same location on Sunday.
    So yes, “a bunch of cops” should have, and could have, done their jobs before the cars were set on fire.

  • http://undefined rek

    Unlike damage done by a hurricane, the erosion of civil rights is prevented by people taking to the streets in defiance.

  • http://undefined rek

    Bad judgment isn’t a crime. Standing outside in a riot isn’t a crime. Bad judgment isn’t breach of peace or provocation. Taking pictures isn’t just cause for arrest.
    You think bystanders used poor judgment? That’s their right. The police? They don’t have that luxury, they have to do it right or face the legal consequences.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    Or by standing up to bullies in the court system and going as far as the high court wherever necessary to secure those civil rights. Witness the battles for non-discriminatory marriage down in the U.S. and in California. Witness our own in 2003.

  • http://undefined torontothegreat

    “Yeah, a bunch of cops should have rushed into a volatile situation to tackle a car jumper guy and then have the crowd turn on them. Brilliant strategy there. You should be chief of police.”
    ummm isn’t that what they get PAID to do? I believe it’s like the FIRST part of their job description? lol

  • http://undefined Erich

    stop arguing over who is to blame at the end of the day you have to turn the clack back and roll up the curtains…
    who was the grey eminence behind this?
    who enabled this functionally?
    how can individual cops and individual protesters be held accountable for anything other than individual transgressions.
    cops who beat should be charged.
    cops who stepped on millimetre should be charged.
    protesters “black bloc” or “agent provocateurs” that actually committed actual crimes should be charged.
    the G20 organisers who furnished Dalton Mcguinty with the verbatim he enacted on Thursday to enable this stupidity should be charged.
    OUR MPP’s who did not protect our rights should be charged.
    the lawyers who crafted the verbatim for G20 organisers to be submitted and put in to Statute should be dis-barred for enabling the transgressions of our human rights..
    Yes more standers by should have helped stop the Vandals and other petty crime, but if you watch enough videos they sound and talk like cops and were aggressive and violent with standers by…
    SO CANADA Next Election get your ass out to the polling station and vote!!!! not for career politicians but for people who will make sound sustainable equitable change.. and ease our emulation of our neighbours to the south…