Family Nature Walks: Wild Edibles

  • High Park Nature Centre (440 Parkside Drive)
  • 1 p.m.

“To eat, or not to eat.” That’s a question you may face this summer while hiking or camping, hungrily eying wild berries and mushrooms. Avoid trailside tummy troubles and join the Wild Edibles edition of Family Nature Walks to learn what is and isn’t safe for humans to eat. Flowers, leaves, berries, seeds, and other fruits of nature may be sampled during the walk.

Details: Family Nature Walks: Wild Edibles

Angels in America Is Worth the Marathon Running Time

An Angel (Raquel Duffy) appears to AIDS patient Prior Walter (Damien Atkins) in Angels in America. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Many people now routinely consume television series in marathon benders, blowing through DVDs or Netflix downloads in a few evenings or a weekend. It’s that sort of experience—but live, of course—that awaits audiences at Soulpepper’s production of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, which offers over six hours of impeccably staged and performed theatre either in two long evenings or over the course of one full day, with multiple intermissions and a meal break.

Details: Angels in America Is Worth the Marathon Running Time

Ongoing…

The Royal Ontario Museum Takes a Modern Approach to the Cradle of Civilization

  • Royal Ontario Museum (100 Queens Park)
  • All day

The name “Mesopotamia” derives from a Greek term meaning “land between the rivers.” The Royal Ontario Museum’s latest major exhibit, which opens on June 22, takes this literally, as visitors flow between painted representations of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers on the floor.

Presented by the British Museum and rounded out with pieces from institutions in Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia, “Mesopotamia: Inventing Our World” covers 3,000 years of human development in the cradle of urban civilization. Most of the 170 artifacts on display have never been shown in Canada.

Details: The Royal Ontario Museum Takes a Modern Approach to the Cradle of Civilization

A Sampling of the Stratford Festival

Scott Wentworth as Tevye, with Jacquelyn French (Hodel), Keely Hutton (Chava) and Jennifer Stewart (Tzeitel) in Fiddler on the Roof. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Multiple venues
  • All day

If Fringe and SummerWorks aren’t enough to satisfy your summer theatre cravings, the world-renowned Stratford Festival is now only a bus ride away from downtown Toronto, thanks to the new Stratford Direct bus route (“the best thing [the Festival] has done in years” according to one usher at the Avon Theatre). Artistic Director Antoni Cimolino has put together a season to please tastes from the traditional to the extravagant. Here’s what we think about five of Stratford’s current productions.

Details: A Sampling of the Stratford Festival

Flight: A Thrilling History of an Idea

  • Toronto Reference Library (789 Yonge Street)
  • All day

Flight: A Thrilling History of an Idea is a new exhibition from the Toronto Reference Library that gathers a number of rare items that explore the theme of the possible and the impossible. Some of the highlights on display are La vingtième siècle: la vie électrique (a rare French book that shows how scientific discoveries would have affected people in 1955), Tame (a sci-fi pulp magazine), and Worldly Wisdom (watercolour that depicts a Leonardo da Vinci-like figure creating a winged flying machine). You’ll find the exhibition in the library’s TD Gallery.

Details: Flight: A Thrilling History of an Idea

TIFF Throws A Toga Party For Comedies

Will Ferrell finds out it's so good once it hits the lips in Old School. Image courtesy of the TIFF Film Reference Library.

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

When Animal House first turned the toga into suitable party attire in 1978, the landscape of the film comedy was forever altered. TOGA! The Reinvention of American Comedy, a new film series that kicked off Wednesday at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, seeks to chart the changing comedic sensibilities that have occurred in the years since the film’s release. From big budget blockbusters, to libido-fuelled sex romps, to carefully calibrated exercises in nuance and timing, the selections in the program are some of the funniest films ever made.

Details: TIFF Throws A Toga Party For Comedies

The World According to “Ai Weiwei: According to What?”

  • Art Gallery of Ontario
  • 10 a.m.

Ai Weiwei is a 56-year-old artist confined to his home in Beijing for creating work critical of the Chinese government and Chinese culture. There are video cameras outside his house, his phone lines are tapped, his blog was deleted, his Shanghai studio was destroyed in 2010 by authorities, and his passport was confiscated in 2011. To this day, he’s unable to leave his country. Even so, Ai Weiwei has had a large presence in Toronto over the past few months.

This past June, he did a performance piece with artist Laurie Anderson during the Luminato Festival, using Skype. His Zodiac Heads have been installed, temporarily, in the reflecting pool in front of City Hall. At this year’s Nuit Blanche, a large-scale version of his sculpture of bicycles, Forever, will take over Nathan Phillips Square. And beginning August 17, the Art Gallery of Ontario is displaying “Ai Weiwei: According to What?”, a retrospective of the work he produced before and after the Chinese government’s crackdown on his activities helped him find new international acclaim.

Details: The World According to “Ai Weiwei: According to What?”

Canadian National Exhibition 2013

Veterans march in the Warrior's Day Parade at the CNE. Photo by Kaeko from the Torontoist Flickr pool.

  • Exhibition Place (Lakeshore Boulevard and Strachan Avenue)
  • 10 a.m.

The Canadian National Exhibition, that storied summer fair, opens for its 135th season. For 18 days, there will be amusement-park rides late into the night, all manner of overindulgent foods to gorge on, long-running traditions like the Warrior’s Day Parade and the Air Show, concerts by bands like The Beach Boys and The New Pornographers, and much, much more.

Details: Canadian National Exhibition 2013

Fresh Wednesday Concerts

  • Nathan Phillips Square (100 Queen Street West)
  • 12:30 p.m.

Go on, escape the office for an extended lunch break and take in the tastes and sounds of Fresh Wednesdays. Each week, a different Canadian artist performs as you purchase baked goods and locally-grown produce from a farmer’s market. Pop singer-songwriter Justin Dubé kicks off the concert series, followed by Beat Café featuring poetry by Raine Maida (July 17), rising folk-pop stars Emma Lee and Peter Katz (August 7), and more.

Details: Fresh Wednesday Concerts

Memory in the Mud

  • Young Welcome Centre, Evergreen Brick Works (550 Bayview Avenue)
  • 1 p.m.

Evergreen Brick Works may be a cool place to ride a bike or check out a farmer’s market, but it also has a rich history that many people don’t know about. Memory in the Mud brings light to these stories with a unique style of roving, interactive theatre courtesy of Words in Motion. Learn about the people who lived and worked at Brick Works throughout the years, including German prisoners of war and those who were left homeless during the Great Depression.

Details: Memory in the Mud

Summers of Catan

The Settlers of Catan: like The Sims for Luddites. Photo courtesy of Summers of Catan.

  • Gladstone Hotel (1214 Queen Street West)
  • 6 p.m.

If you’ve never played Settlers of Catan, you’re probably wondering what could be more dull than spending your evening playing a board game about old-timey landowners. But that’s because you haven’t played it, yet. Gladstone Hotel aims to change that with their Summers of Catan program. Every Wednesday, gather with other Catan-fans, drink specially discounted beer, and get settled! Bring your own boards, or use those provided.

Details: Summers of Catan

Everyday Is Like Sunday Screening

  • Carlton Cinemas (20 Carlton Street)
  • 7 p.m.

A new, locally made movie, Everyday Is Like Sunday, features some mainstays from our city’s comedy and music scenes. Directed by Pavan Moondi, it follows friends Mark (David Dineen-Porter) and Jason (Adam Gurfinkel) as they muddle through their semi-adult lives. It also stars Coral Osborne and Nick Flanagan, and there are turns by Nick Thorburn (Islands, Mister Heavenly) and Dan Werb (Woodhands, Ark Analog). The film has its premiere screening at the Carlton on Friday, August 16, with a Q&A and opening party after.

Details: Everyday Is Like Sunday Screening

Dancing in the Town Square

Go shopping for dancing shoes, and then put them to use in the Town Square. Photo courtesy of the Shops at Don Mills.

  • Shops at Don Mills (1090 Don Mills Road)
  • 7 p.m.

Like something out of a movie (except, you know, Footloose), you can spend your summer nights dancing in the open air of the Town Square. Join Dexter and Janice of DjDance as they lead Latin Salsa classes twice a week, all summer.

Details: Dancing in the Town Square

Richard III Schemes His Way to the Top in Withrow Park

Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Alex McCooeye, at right), counsels his detained brother George, Duke of Clarence (Jesse Griffiths), whom he will soon betray. Photo by Nick Kozak.

  • Withrow Park (Bain and Logan Avenues)
  • 7 p.m.

Known as Shakespeare’s greatest villain, the title character in Richard III doesn’t seem an obvious choice of anti-hero for Shakespeare in the Ruff, an east-end alfresco classical theatre company, revived in 2012 after a six-year absence. The play, one of the Bard’s longest, typically runs more than three hours in its entirety, and is full of politics, intrigue, and murder.

Not your typical fare for summer theatre in the park. But the company, which delighted audiences with its madcap Two Gentlemen of Verona last year, has two aces up its sleeves: a fruitful collaboration with director, actor, and educator Diane D’Aquila, and leading man (and D’Aquila’s former National Theatre School student) Alex McCooeye.

Details: Richard III Schemes His Way to the Top in Withrow Park

Anything Goes is a Real Trip

Rachel York and a bunch of dancing sailors in Roundabout Theatre Company’s Anything Goes, presented by Mirvish Productions. Photo by Joan Marcus.

  • Princess of Wales Theatre (300 King Street West)
  • 2 p.m., 8 p.m.

Musical theatre has a reputation for sometimes being out of touch and old-fashioned, so the prospect of Mirvish Productions bringing a tour of Cole Porter’s 1934 musical Anything Goes to Toronto wasn’t especially heartening at first—even if this particular production, by New York City’s Roundabout Theatre Company, won three 2011 Tony Awards.

But say, pal, wouldn’t you know, we were downright tickled to have such a good time at the Princess of Wales Theatre. The jokes are still corny, the songs still melodramatic, and the script still has some pretty racist content, but the show manages to transcend its era.

Details: Anything Goes is a Real Trip

The Rascals: Once Upon a Dream

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 8 p.m.

Revisiting history is more fun with a soundtrack, as you’ll find in The Rascals: Once Upon a Dream. Based on the story of one of rock’s most influential bands, this Broadway-show-meets-concert takes the audience back through the ’60s with hit songs like “Good Lovin’,” “Groovin’,” and “It’s a Beautiful Morning.” Produced and directed by the legendary Steven Van Zandt, the show combines performance, archival footage, live narrative, and film reenactments.

Details: The Rascals: Once Upon a Dream

Macbeth and Shrew Arrive at Shakespeare in High Park

Philippa Domville and Hugh Thompson in Macbeth. Photo by David Hou.

  • High Park Amphitheatre (1873 Bloor St. W.)
  • 8 p.m.

In the 31st year of Shakespeare in High Park, Canadian Stage has programmed two productions that are performed on alternating evenings. The two plays could not be more different.

Both Macbeth and The Taming of the Shrew involve manipulative spouses and deceptive plots—but where one ends in marriages and love, the other ends with bloodshed and terror. One is infamously problematic, and the other is one of Shakespeare’s most popular. And the two directors, Ted Witzel and Ker Wells, both of whom join Shakespeare in High Park after completing a directing program held in collaboration between Canadian Stage and York University, only exaggerate the differences.

Details: Macbeth and Shrew Arrive at Shakespeare in High Park

TIFF in the Park

  • David Pecaut Square (221 King Street West)
  • 8:30 p.m.

Love is in the air this summer as TIFF in the Park returns for another season of outdoor film screenings, showcasing the best romances from across the decades. Bring a blanket and get comfy on the lawn (yes, the Entertainment District has green space, too) to enjoy everything from Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights, to Casablanca, Sleepless in Seattle, and The Notebook.

Details: TIFF in the Park

Eamon McGrath’s Celebrated Summer Residency

Eamon McGrath will be performing at Handlebar for Pinball Sessions' 1 Year Anniversary Show. Image courtesy of Eamon McGrath.

  • Dakota Tavern (249 Ossington Avenue)
  • 9 p.m.

Folk-punk rocker Eamon McGrath is making the best of summer with a residency at The Dakota Tavern. He’s curated a plethora of Canadian bands to take the stage with him every week, ranging anywhere from country to brash rock and roll. Donovan Woods kicks off the series on August 14, followed by acts like Nick Everett (August 28), Camp Radio (September 18), and many more.

Details: Eamon McGrath’s Celebrated Summer Residency

Harbourfront Free Flicks: Invented Worlds

  • Harbourfront, WestJet Stage (235 Queens Quay West)
  • 9 p.m.

Do you feel guilty about staying indoors in front of your TV when it’s nice outside? There’s a way around that—sitting by the lake and catching great films every week with Harbourfront’s Free Flicks. This year, NOW Magazine’s Norm Wilner has chosen a crop of imagination-stretching films from notable directors and writers. From Little Shop of Horrors, to The Triplets of Belleville, and That Thing You Do!, each title resides, at least a little bit, in the fantasy world.

CORRECTION: July 3, 2013, 11:00 AM This post originally listed Fantastic Mr. Fox and Moulin Rouge! as films being shown, when they are actually just options for the audience choice film.

Details: Harbourfront Free Flicks: Invented Worlds

Manhunt

  • Multiple venues
  • 9 p.m.

Some people never outgrow their love of childhood outdoor games. If you’re one of them, you need to join the Manhunt Toronto network. Every week they stake out a different corner of the city to engineer a series of “radical” games of Hide and Seek, Capture the Flag, Freeze Tag, and Octopus in parks and urban spaces. Check their site to find out where to meet up each night.

Details: Manhunt