Capybara Sightings on the Rise, a Fight in a Mississauga Parking Lot, and a Ridesharing Service that Empowers Women
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Capybara Sightings on the Rise, a Fight in a Mississauga Parking Lot, and a Ridesharing Service that Empowers Women

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  • While the search for the escaped capybaras still drags on, hundreds of people have claimed to see the big lovable rodents running all over the city. Either there’s been an explosion in the Canadian capybara population, or those people mistook another four-legged creature for the city’s most infamous fugitives. The people who’ve reported sightings of capybara have called 311 by the hundreds, and others have taken a less serious approach, posting on social media. Staff from the High Park Zoo say they’re following up on capybara tips, but none have yielded results.
  • In a scene usually reserved for Black Friday in the U.S., a fight broke out in the parking lot of a Costco in Mississauga. It all started the way so many pointless violent altercations do: over a contested parking space. The fight was between two parties, and police have reviewed video of the incident, and decided not to press charges against anyone involved. The moral of the story being, don’t fight over a parking space, because obviously.
  • With all the controversy still swirling around Uber, a Toronto entrepreneur is looking to capitalize with a safer option that empowers women. After an unpleasant experience in a cab, Aisha Addo decided there had to be a way for women to get around Toronto without creepy questions, or an unsafe environment. The app is called DriveHer, and it will operate just like Uber, but only pick up women passengers and have all women drivers. Addo still has hurdles to overcome though, like coming up with the $20,000 licensing application fee, getting police checks for all her drivers, and purchasing the required insurance. Even with those obstacles, she hopes to have cars on the road in August.
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