Extra, Extra: Restaurant Industry Labour Exploitation, Humane Society of Canada CEO in Doghouse, and a New Sexual Harassment Bill
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Extra, Extra: Restaurant Industry Labour Exploitation, Humane Society of Canada CEO in Doghouse, and a New Sexual Harassment Bill

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Sign outside of Enoteca Sociale, a Toronto restaurant seeking to improve its labour practices  Photo by Joseph Chan from the Torontoist Flickr Pool

Sign outside of Enoteca Sociale, a Toronto restaurant seeking to improve its labour practices. Photo by Joseph Chan from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

  • Over at the Globe, food writer Corey Mintz writes of the restaurant industry’s institutionalized disregard of labour standards. Mintz points out that Toronto cooks will, in addition to working gruelling hours, often make barely over (and sometimes under) Ontario’s $11.25 hourly minimum wage. Some local chefs are starting to make efforts improve the working conditions of their kitchen staff.
  • The CEO of the Toronto-based Humane Society of Canada is in hot water for purportedly using the organization’s charitable donations for personal means, thus threatening the organization’s tax free status. Michael O’Sullivan is under investigation by the CRA for using “a large portion” of the animal rescue group’s funds for “personal gain”—his lawyers argue that any discrepancies can be chalked up to an accounting error.
  • A bill tabled in Queen’s Park today seeks to lay the smackdown against sexual violence and harassment in the workplace. The legislation, which builds on a three-year campaign dubbed “It’s Never Okay,” will make it easier for victims to take action against sexual abuse on the job.
  • From today’s edition of 12:36: Mayor John Tory invites you to appreciate Rogers today. John Tory, a former president and CEO of Rogers Media, has declared an official citywide day of appreciation for the Blue Jays, a Rogers-owned sports team. During his press briefing about the proclamation, though, he betrayed some frustration with his one-time employer: the mayor said a lack of online streaming options forced him to track game six of the ALCS on his iPad, like a hobo—which he called “a decidedly unappealing and even more suspenseful way to watch a baseball game.” (Want more 12:36? Subscribe to it now.)

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