The Big Five: June 5-7

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The Big Five: June 5-7

Every Friday, Torontoist provides a not-so-scientific roundup of the best people, places and things to check out over the weekend. The result: The Big Five.

Feist performed at 2013's Field Trip  Photo by Yiyo81 from the Torontoist Flickr Pool

Feist performed at 2013’s Field Trip. Photo by Yiyo81 from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Field Trip
Fort York and Garrison Common
June 6-7
Tickets $70-200

The weather may not feel like it, but it’s time for another Field Trip. This year’s edition of the annual weekend fest features My Morning Jacket, Alabama Shakes, De La Soul, and Hayden. There will also be food trucks, art installations, and a day camp for the kiddies.

Full Moon Party
Hanlan’s Point, The Island
June 5-7
Free.

Witches, werewolves, romantics, astronauts—who doesn’t love a full moon? Celebrate the moon at Hanlan’s Point, play badminton, hang around a bonfire, and listen to some music. Make it your first Island experience of 2015.

Police Carding: Not a Black and White Issue
Walk starts at City Hall, 100 Queen Street West
June 7, 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Free admission.


Jay Pitter leads this Jane’s Walk on the controversial police practice of carding. The walk hopes to highlight how the implications of carding go beyond racial profiling, and affect how we negotiate public space in the city.

Lulaworld
Dundas West Fest, 204-1457 Dundas Street West
June 6, 12:00 p.m.
Free.

Check out Lulaworld as part of the Dundas West Fest. The event features the music of the Americas, including Canada’s biggest Brazilian drumming performance, acclaimed salsa vocalists, and Mexican folk musicians.

Alphanumeric! A ReBoot Marathon
Smiling Buddha (961 College Street)
June 6, 12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Free.

Do you remember ReBoot, and how you nerded out over it in grade four? Well now you can re-live those awkwardly excellent times with a marathon of the pioneering Canadian show. The Smiling Buddha will play 13 episodes from different points in the show, and you can reminisce about how you once thought it was all state-of-the-art, but the storytelling holds it together now.

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