Toronto Star Briefly Declares Canucks Stanley Cup Champs
Torontoist has been acquired by Daily Hive Toronto - Your City. Now. Click here to learn more.

Torontoist

3 Comments

news

Toronto Star Briefly Declares Canucks Stanley Cup Champs

canucks_cup_toist.jpg
A screengrab from SportsLogos.net showing part of the Star‘s inadvertently posted story.

Come now, Vancouver fans. Why the long face? So what if Boston scored its first two goals in 40 seconds last night, scooting Luongo off the ice faster than you can shout “LUUUUU!!!”? Or if Mason Raymond, after a swift first-period hit, was taken hobbling from the Boston Garden and, ultimately, the Stanley Cup Finals? You’re acting like you lost game six. Not only that, you’re acting like you lost it in breathtaking, Benny Hill fashion.
Which might have something to do with the fact that you did. Whatever, take a cue from the Toronto Star last night—just straight up ignore what happened and say you won.


That’s what Chris Creamer of SportsLogos.net noticed this morning. After the dismal 5–2 defeat, which came depressingly close to another shutout, Creamer may have been one of many who quietly turned off the TV, shook off the loss, and shuffled off to bed as if nothing happened. This morning, he said, “I logged into the website of the Toronto Star surprised to find out I missed quite the third period comeback last night.”
Indeed. Even with the Bruins’ steamrolling, the Star—or whichever editor was stoking the fires when the game ended—retained enough optimism to splash a good half of the publication’s website with a glossy, triumphant image of Alexandre Burrows and Luongo after game five, jubilant to the point of stroke, emblazoned with the words “CANUCKS BRING HOME THE CUP.” From the picture, you could imagine Burrows screaming it until his face matched his jersey.
Which, in all fairness, is a pretty simple error, as subject to Murphy’s Law as the Canucks’ performance in game six. News stories as big as the conclusion of the Stanley Cup Finals—or at least key elements, like images—are often prepared in advance, ready to be published as soon as the horn sounds to end the third period. (We tried reaching someone at the Star to ask how long the image was up on their main page before they removed it, to no avail.) These things happen; it’s just a question of why. Perhaps it was owing to the late hour, perhaps out of a sense of patriotic denial.
Creamer, meanwhile, offered Vancouver his congratulations on the revisionist win. “You don’t need to show up at Rogers Arena tomorrow for game seven after all,” he wrote.
Fortunately, the Canucks are probably a bit more realistic about tomorrow than the Star was about yesterday.

Comments