Urban Planner: March 2, 2011

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Urban Planner: March 2, 2011

Urban Planner is Torontoist’s guide to what’s on in Toronto, published every weekday morning, and in a weekend edition Friday afternoons. If you have an event you’d like considered, email all of its details—as well as images, if you’ve got any—to events@torontoist.com.


In today’s short and sweet Urban Planner: visit a brothel with Anusree Roy, play some sexy bingo with Good For Her, catch a special performance of Tom Waits’ music with the multi-instrumental Orchestre d’Hommes-Orchestres, and hear a space expert discuss his book about life beyond our solar system—aliens!

THEATRE: Anusree Roy’s new play (and her first to be produced independently of Theatre Jones Roy), Brothel #9, is about a woman sold into a brothel and struggling to break free, and it opens tomorrow at Factory. Roy’s recent work, including Roshni, Pyaasa, and Letters to My Grandma, have all been hugely successful, so catch Brothel #9‘s final preview tonight before its regular performances inevitably sell out. Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street), 7 p.m., $15.
BINGO: What could possibly be hotter on a Wednesday night than sexy bingo at the Gladstone? No, really: it’s hosted by Good For Her and features surprise screenings, performances, and prizes. Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar (1214 Queen Street West), 7:30 p.m., FREE (though organizers will glady accept donations towards Good For Her’s Feminist Porn Awards).
MUSIC: L’Orchestre D’Hommes-Orchestres performs a tribute to Tom Waits featuring a hundred everyday objects as instruments (including a suitcase, a pair of scissors, spaghetti, hammers, boxing gloves, and teapots) and special guests The New Cackle Sisters. The Theatre Centre (1087 Queen Street West), 7:30 p.m., $25.
SCIENCE: Professor Ray Jayawardhana, a renowned astronomer and professor of astronomy and astrophysics, will discuss his book Strange New Worlds: The Search for Alien Planets and Life Beyond Our Solar System. Jayawardhana has written extensively about astronomy for the public and is especially celebrated for his ability to explain complex ideas in less academic, more accessible language. North York Central Library (5120 Yonge Street) 7 p.m., FREE.

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