This Ain't the Village
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This Ain’t the Village

20100816justindiciano.jpg
Photo by Stephen Michalowicz/Torontoist.


Justin Di Ciano thinks The Queensway should be a little more like Bloor West Village. Or at least that’s an implicit part of a key platform that Di Ciano is hoping to capitalize on as he campaigns to replace incumbent Etobicoke-Lakeshore Councillor Peter Milczyn in Ward 5.
This past weekend, Di Ciano moved into a fancy new campaign headquarters on the ground floor of the condo on the southwest corner of Bloor Street West and Islington Avenue, and decked out the exterior with standard campaign posters, including several giant portraits of himself, multicultural stock photos, and the image above, which we originally thought was just a token photo from the neighbourhood—though something seemed a tad off about it. After some Googling hard research, and a trip to Di Ciano’s campaign site, we determined that the photo was actually of Bloor West Village: Bloor Street West, near Runnymede Road, to be precise. Note: this is not in Ward 5.
So, last night, to find out whether this was a gaffe, an expression of Di Ciano’s vision for The Queensway, or something else, we went to the grand opening of his campaign office. When we asked him about the image, he told us that he snapped it himself, and that it’s merely a representation of what a “revitalized” Queensway could look like, not necessarily what it should look like.
It’s a little odd to feature the image of another ward on the outside of your campaign office without providing context, but hey, sprucing up The Queensway—or at least trying to—isn’t a terrible idea. In fact, it might be one of the better ideas we’ve heard so far in this election cycle.
Unfortunately, our interview with Di Ciano was cut short. After our preliminary discussion, we pulled out our digital recorder and politely asked for a quote. Di Ciano told us that he’d have to ask his campaign manager, who told his boss “no”—ending the interview.
We understand that a new candidate’s first few steps can be tough, and that mistakes are inevitable, but if Di Ciano wants to be a councillor, he’s eventually going to have to stand up and publicly answer questions. From hereon out, they’re only going to get tougher. That said, Di Ciano has some interesting policy ideas, and we hope to hear more in the future.

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