Vintage Toronto Ads: Who's Got King Clancy's Eno?
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Vintage Toronto Ads: Who’s Got King Clancy’s Eno?

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Source: The Toronto Star, March 31, 1936

When travelling by train between key games during the Stanley Cup playoffs, the last thing a hardened hockey player wants to suffer is indigestion. If King Clancy and his teammates actually did pop a few tablets to rid themselves of “the poisonous wastes that slow a man down,” they helped the Maple Leafs defeat the New York Americans two games to one during the 1936 semi-finals.
Francis Michael “King” Clancy arrived in Toronto through a trade with the Ottawa Senators on the eve of the 1930–31 season. After his retirement early in the 1936–37 season and a brief coaching stint with the Montreal Maroons, Clancy spent a decade as a referee. He returned to the Maple Leafs as a coach in the early 1950s and held various positions in the organization until his death in 1986. He was one of the rare individuals who, thanks to his charming personality, stayed on friendly terms with Harold Ballard during the latter’s stormy reign as the team’s owner.
Toronto fans would have been familiar with Harold “Baldy” Cotton, who had played just over six seasons with the Maple Leafs before being traded to the Americans before the season began. After retiring in 1937, Cotton would be heard by a generation of hockey fans as one of the experts of the “Hot Stove League” segment of radio broadcasts and on Hockey Night in Canada.
Unfortunately, a dose of Eno didn’t provide the Maple Leafs with enough pep during the final round of the playoffs. The Detroit Red Wings, who had endured the longest playoff game in NHL history during the semi-finals (six overtime periods were needed to defeat the Maroons), won the Stanley Cup in four games.

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