Pillows Are For Squares
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Pillows Are For Squares

pillowfight1.jpg
Earlier this afternoon, an army of pillow-wielders (and camera-wielders) descended on Nathan Phillips Square to take part in Newmindspace’s hopefully-annual pillow fight.
While the floor of the square filled up with feathers (which were, of course, cleaned up at the end by a pack of volunteers), some fighters hurled out lines from movies like Scarface (“say hello to my little friend!”) and 300 (“tonight we dine in hell!”); some picked out and fought intense one-on-one battles; and others just randomly hurled their pillows in every possible direction. Those in search of a reason to slag Newmindspace would be hard-pressed to find one: injuries were as minimal as injuries get—a slightly bloody nose—and the worst mischief in the day seemed to be the theft of several pillows.
Numbers didn’t quite approach the 1,000 confirmed attendees on Facebook, but a few hundred strong still showed up to fight—or record the action around the square with everything from holy-crap-thank-God-I-had-this-on-me cameraphones to the another-day-at-the-office video cameras of the local mainstream media. The abundance of cameras wasn’t surprising for a Newmindspace event (after all, even CNN had a slideshow for the New York pillow fight on their website), but there were so many lenses that when, as the number of participants started dwindling after about an hour, those with cameras actually started to outnumber those with pillows.
While some fighters seemed a little unhappy about the omnipresence of cameras (especially when a circle of photographers formed, as it did around a smiling little kid pinning down his friend dressed in a Spiderman costume), the nature of Newmindspace’s events is that they are both participator- and spectator-friendly. Toronto needs more of what they’ve got to offer.
Photo by David Topping. Lots more are in the event’s Flickr set, or can be found by searching Flickr at large or Torontoist’s Flickr Pool.

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