CopyCamp

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CopyCamp

2006_08_18copycamp.jpg
CopyCamp is an “unconference” (hateful term) coming to Toronto September 28, 29, 30, at Ryerson Student Campus Centre. It’s very much a planned do-it-yourself-you-participants affair, so there’s no agenda (yet) and the wiki doesn’t go up until a couple of weeks prior. From their site:

CopyCamp is a place to meet people making art and making waves, an opportunity to discover how the Internet can work for artists and fans, and a chance to debate the value(s) of copyright with some of the key players. It is an event in which participants drive the programming, and debates are genuine round-tables. There are no observers: everyone has something to offer and is expected to contribute.
There will be an electronic salon showcasing successful projects. There will be internationally-acclaimed experts. There will be a carefully selected mix of artists, geeks, and bureaucrats, with conversation always focused squarely on the arts, and the interests of creators.

The last bit is the focus and the point. This is not the radical open source crowd, where everything is free for use. But nor is it the industry people, with their DRMs and root kit disasters. It’s the child of the CRA-ADC — the Creators’ Rights Alliance, a group dedicated to ensuring that the rights of the artist don’t get lost in the big high-stakes shuffle that’s now going on in copyright law and which is stacked pretty heavily with folks from The Writers Union of Canada (TWUC). The organizing team, though, seems more broadly based.
So is Torontoist going? Weeeellll…. see, it’s 700 of your common loons to ensure a seat, which is a plusher po place than we’re used to. Don’t despair: there is a limited number of early bird seats for only 495 of your feathered friends. Still sad and blue? The good news is that a whole bunch of spots will be provided at “a subsidized rate” for “artists and other creators who we think would make valuable contributions to the conference.”
Torontoist applied for the subsidy, because the rate the boss pays us falls just shy of what’s necessary. And our contribution? Priceless.
We’ll keep you informed.

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