Your Toronto 2014 Issue Navigator

How the candidates compare on some of the city's biggest issues.

The AGO Expands Its Horizons With New First Nations Exhibit

Patrick DesJarlait, Maple Sugar Time, 1946. Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Patrick DesJarlait, Maple Sugar Time, 1946. Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • Saturday, July 26–Tuesday, November 25

Toronto has increasingly strived to honour the region’s First Nations—whether by acknowledging the historical presence of the Mississaugas of the New Credit on current City land or commemorating pre-European communities and trade routes. Now the Art Gallery of Ontario is following suit, staging an exhibition that highlights Anishinaabe artists from the Great Lakes region and making a greater effort to include indigenous art in its Canadian galleries.

Before and After the Horizon: Anishinaabe Artists of the Great Lakes is a collaborative effort of the AGO and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, in New York City, where the exhibition recently wrapped up after a one-year run. The displays are organized by themes relating to Anishinaabe concepts of place and spirituality, and how they interact with the outside world. One of the most intriguing themes is “cottager colonialism,” which suggests that the colonization of indigenous land continues by way of vacationing tourists. Political statements are scattered throughout the exhibition, from Nadia Myre’s bead-covered pages of the Indian Act to the use of historical indigenous status documents in Robert Houle’s “Premises” series. Floral beaded bags and leggings, meanwhile, provide inspiration for the contemporary paintings of Christi Belcourt, an Ontario Arts Council Aboriginal Arts Award recipient.

Details: The AGO Expands Its Horizons With New First Nations Exhibit

Celebrating the Enduring Vision of Alex Colville

Alex Colville. Family and Rainstorm, 1955. On loan from the National Gallery of Canada. © A.C.Fine Art Inc. Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Alex Colville. Family and Rainstorm, 1955. On loan from the National Gallery of Canada. © A.C.Fine Art Inc. Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • Saturday, August 23–Sunday, January 4

Alex Colville’s paintings include some of the most recognizable works of Canadian art. Prints of his iconic Horse and Train and To Prince Edward Island hang in homes and classrooms and art shops around the world. And yet the Toronto-born artist, whose career spanned seven decades, is not often celebrated for the incredible influence he had on artists of many media.

With its new exhibition, “Alex Colville, opening August 23, the Art Gallery of Ontario has mounted a show that not only documents the career of one of Canada’s most prolific artists, but also examines the nature of inspiration in art, literature, film, and beyond.

Andrew Hunter, AGO curator of Canadian art, was first moved to consider the idea of a Colville showcase when the artist passed away last July. But, says Hunter, he did not want to present a memorial. Instead, the AGO worked closely with Colville’s daughter, Ann Kitz, to create an exhibition that showcases the ongoing relevance of Colville’s work.

Details: Celebrating the Enduring Vision of Alex Colville

Cirque du Soleil’s Kurios Creates Steampunk Wonderland

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  • Grand Chapiteau (51 Commissioners Street)
    • Friday, August 29–Tuesday, December 23

Cirque du Soleil is magical. Across from T&T Supermarket on Cherry Street, the pop-up striped tent transforms Polson Pier into a scene of fantastical fun—it’s a better location than any Las Vegas hotel or Orlando strip mall. And when you walk into the Grand Chapiteau venue, you’re welcomed into a bizarro steampunk contortionist dream.

Kicking off its North American tour in Toronto, Kurios: Cabinet of Curiosities is Cirque du Soleil’s latest show. The official plot explanation is abstract and boring: there’s a Seeker in his own imaginary world called Curiosistan finding inventions with robots that smell like leather. It’s confusing to even layer a narrative over the spinning, jumping, flying and balancing. No one had no idea what was going on–but everyone loved the show. Details.

Details: Cirque du Soleil’s Kurios Creates Steampunk Wonderland

TIFF Cinematheque Introduces Toronto to Late Godard

Still from Sauve qui peut (la vie).

Still from Sauve qui peut (la vie).

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
    • Friday, October 3–Monday, December 22

Weekend, Jean-Luc Godard’s capstone to his work in the 1960s, closes on a dark note worthy of the apocalyptic drama that precedes it. “Fin de cinéma,” boasts the final title card, suggesting an end to more than simply the film we’ve just seen. For a lot of fans of Godard’s formally daring, endlessly inventive films in his most widely celebrated period, that note proved prophetic: the consensus around what followed, mostly from people who saw at most a film or two, is that Godard became something of a difficult, Maoist, anti-American scold whose prolific output was not worth tracking. You can’t entirely blame casual cinephiles for not disabusing themselves of that opinion, given how hard it’s been to track down so many of Godard’s later films, many of which have languished undistributed after festival debuts and limited runs. Enter TIFF Cinematheque, which offers the back half of its exhaustive Godard retrospective this fall under the perfectly Godardian title Godard Forever: Part Two.

Details: TIFF Cinematheque Introduces Toronto to Late Godard