Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

20140306imperialthrone
  • Royal Ontario Museum (100 Queens Park)
  • All day

If The Forbidden City: Inside the Court of China’s Emperors has a mascot, it’s Emperor Yongzheng. The image of the 18th-century Chinese ruler dominates the promotional material of the exhibition, which is one of the centrepieces of the Royal Ontario Museum’s centennial year. His portrait certainly has visual appeal, but Yongzheng is also a figure associated with surprising elements of life within the former imperial palace.

Details: A Journey Into the Forbidden City

TIFF Cinematheque: The Homes and Worlds of Satyajit Ray

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

You’d be hard-pressed to think of a filmmaker more frequently linked to his national cinema in the popular imagination than Satyajit Ray, whose work in the 1950s brought an independent streak to the production of Indian cinema as famously as Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless countered the establishment of French costume dramas around the same time. Yet prior to the 1990s, you might have found it equally difficult to name a major international figurehead who was as underrepresented at repertory screenings, so dire was the state of the films’ prints.

Twenty years after the Academy Film Archive restored the Bengali director’s deteriorating and otherwise endangered negatives and made proper retrospectives possible, TIFF Cinematheque offers “The Sun and the Moon: The Films of Satyajit Ray,” a far-ranging program that gives Toronto audiences the opportunity to see the fruit of that labour as well as the work of arguably India’s most influential filmmaker.

Details: TIFF Cinematheque: The Homes and Worlds of Satyajit Ray

The AGO Expands Its Horizons With New First Nations Exhibit

Patrick DesJarlait, Maple Sugar Time, 1946. Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Patrick DesJarlait, Maple Sugar Time, 1946. Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

Toronto has increasingly strived to honour the region’s First Nations—whether by acknowledging the historical presence of the Mississaugas of the New Credit on current City land or commemorating pre-European communities and trade routes. Now the Art Gallery of Ontario is following suit, staging an exhibition that highlights Anishinaabe artists from the Great Lakes region and making a greater effort to include indigenous art in its Canadian galleries.

Before and After the Horizon: Anishinaabe Artists of the Great Lakes is a collaborative effort of the AGO and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, in New York City, where the exhibition recently wrapped up after a one-year run. The displays are organized by themes relating to Anishinaabe concepts of place and spirituality, and how they interact with the outside world. One of the most intriguing themes is “cottager colonialism,” which suggests that the colonization of indigenous land continues by way of vacationing tourists. Political statements are scattered throughout the exhibition, from Nadia Myre’s bead-covered pages of the Indian Act to the use of historical indigenous status documents in Robert Houle’s “Premises” series. Floral beaded bags and leggings, meanwhile, provide inspiration for the contemporary paintings of Christi Belcourt, an Ontario Arts Council Aboriginal Arts Award recipient.

Details: The AGO Expands Its Horizons With New First Nations Exhibit

Bent Lens: Pride on Screen

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

Every part of our city will be drenched in WorldPride this summer, including the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Bent Lens: Pride on Screen comprises nearly two months of screenings, exhibits, and speaking engagements that reflect the broadness of our LGBT community. Check out films under the stars in David Pecaut Square, take in a conversation with Laverne Cox of Orange is the New Black, and much more.

CORRECTION: June 16, 2014, 3:50 PM This post originally stated that the outdoor screenings of Bent Lens will focus on Derek Jarman and Bruce LaBruce, but that is not the case.

Details: Bent Lens: Pride on Screen

Best of Fringe 2014

Ruth Goodwin and Courtney Ch'ng Lancaster are two of the "random" actors in 52 Pick-Up. Photo by Vincenzo Pietropaolo.

Ruth Goodwin and Courtney Ch'ng Lancaster are two of the "random" actors in 52 Pick-Up. Photo by Vincenzo Pietropaolo.

  • Toronto Centre for the Arts (5040 Yonge Street)
  • All day

With so many sold-out shows at this year’s Toronto Fringe Festival, there were plenty of people who didn’t get to see many of Torontoist‘s top picks. Not to worry: as they have for several years now, the Toronto Centre for the Arts is presenting Best of Fringe, a two-week additional run for some of the most popular shows at this year’s festival, including Theatre Brouhaha’s Punch-Up, Pea Green Theatre’s Three Men in a Boat, and The Howland Company’s 52 Pick-Up. We strongly suggest double billing shows over an evening (each show runs about an hour) and buying tickets well in advance, as each show gets only three performances.

Details: Best of Fringe 2014

CityPlace Farmers’ Market

Photo by Stephen Morris from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

Photo by Stephen Morris from the Torontoist Flickr Pool.

  • Canoe Landing Park (Fort York Boulevard and Dan Leckie Way)
  • 3:30 p.m.

Although living in the centre of downtown is awesome, it does have its drawbacks—namely, the lack of nearby farms and the delicious fresh produce they provide. But not anymore! Every Tuesday until October, CityPlace Farmers’ Market will be setting up shop in Canoe Landing Park, nestled in the heart of condo-ville. Drop by to stock up on fruits, vegetables, and other goods, grown, made, and sold by local farmers.

Details: CityPlace Farmers’ Market

Tai Chi by the Lake

  • Harbourfront Centre (235 Queens Quay West)
  • 6 p.m.

If you’ve ever walked through a park and come across a group of people moving slowly in unison, this is your chance to find out what they’re up to. Every Tuesday this summer, Harbourfront Centre will be hosting free Tai Chi classes in the Exhibition Common. Join instructor Eti Greenberg for an hour of stretching and positions to focus the mind and promote good health.

Details: Tai Chi by the Lake