Live on the Patio

Belle Starr (Stephanie Cadman, Kendel Carson, and Miranda Mulholland) performs on the Roy Thomson patio July 31. Photo by Ilia Horsburgh.

Belle Starr (Stephanie Cadman, Kendel Carson, and Miranda Mulholland) performs on the Roy Thomson patio July 31. Photo by Ilia Horsburgh.

  • Roy Thomson Hall (60 Simcoe Street)
  • 5 p.m.

If the patio is your summer destination of choice, Roy Thomson Hall wants to sweeten your sun-soaking with its Live on the Patio music series. Every week you can enjoy a few drinks, food from Barque Smokehouse, and great entertainment, while unwinding next to a charming urban pond. Check out Sun K and Grey Lands (July 17), Francesco Yates (July 24), Belle Starr (July 31), and the TSO Brass Quintet (August 7).

Details: Live on the Patio

CineMacabre: Curtains

  • Royal Cinema (608 College Street)
  • 9:30 p.m.

Never before has drapery been so horrifying! This month’s Rue Morgue CineMacabre is a very special screening of the restored 1983 slasher flick Curtains. When six actresses head out to a remote mansion to audition for a movie role, they find themselves up against some pretty, uh, killer competition. Booze will be behind the bar, gruesome snacks at the concession, and star Lynne Griffin in the audience!

Details: CineMacabre: Curtains

Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

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While the Toronto International Film Festival may have shifted into a more relaxed mode, it’s still offering plenty of opportunities to gawk at movie stars—they’re just a little more spread out. Midweek, fans could catch the premieres of Good Kill (Ethan Hawke as a drone pilot), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg’s new bit of oddness), The Imitation Game (Benedict Cumberbatch as World War II cryptographer Alan Turing), Jauja (Viggo Mortensen, and we don’t know much else really), Laggies (Sam Rockwell and Keira Knightley in a comedy about people taking their sweet time to grow up), October Gale (Patricia Clarkson and Scott Speedman in a thriller/drama set in a remote cabin), Pawn Sacrifice (about the chess duels between Boris Spassky and Bobby Fischer), The Cobbler (Adam Sandler’s latest) and Escobar (Benicio Del Toro is the famous drug kingpin).


Want more TIFF coverage? Torontoist‘s film festival hub is right over here.
Details: TIFF 2014 Scenes: Tuesday–Thursday Nights, Featuring Good Kill, Maps to the Stars, The Imitation Game, Jauja, Laggies, and More

Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

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  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

“The greatest art always returns you to the vulnerabilities of the human situation.” – Francis Bacon

“In the human figure one can express more completely one’s feelings about the world than in any other way.” – Henry Moore

These quotations, which welcome visitors to Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty,” immediately establish the exhibition’s tone and focus. Each artist’s distortions of the human figure, shaped by their wartime experiences, capture the vulnerability of our mortal forms.

Details: Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

TIFF Cinematheque: The Homes and Worlds of Satyajit Ray

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

You’d be hard-pressed to think of a filmmaker more frequently linked to his national cinema in the popular imagination than Satyajit Ray, whose work in the 1950s brought an independent streak to the production of Indian cinema as famously as Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless countered the establishment of French costume dramas around the same time. Yet prior to the 1990s, you might have found it equally difficult to name a major international figurehead who was as underrepresented at repertory screenings, so dire was the state of the films’ prints.

Twenty years after the Academy Film Archive restored the Bengali director’s deteriorating and otherwise endangered negatives and made proper retrospectives possible, TIFF Cinematheque offers “The Sun and the Moon: The Films of Satyajit Ray,” a far-ranging program that gives Toronto audiences the opportunity to see the fruit of that labour as well as the work of arguably India’s most influential filmmaker.

Details: TIFF Cinematheque: The Homes and Worlds of Satyajit Ray

Bent Lens: Pride on Screen

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

Every part of our city will be drenched in WorldPride this summer, including the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Bent Lens: Pride on Screen comprises nearly two months of screenings, exhibits, and speaking engagements that reflect the broadness of our LGBT community. Check out films under the stars in David Pecaut Square, take in a conversation with Laverne Cox of Orange is the New Black, and much more.

CORRECTION: June 16, 2014, 3:50 PM This post originally stated that the outdoor screenings of Bent Lens will focus on Derek Jarman and Bruce LaBruce, but that is not the case.

Details: Bent Lens: Pride on Screen

Best of Fringe 2014

Ruth Goodwin and Courtney Ch'ng Lancaster are two of the "random" actors in 52 Pick-Up. Photo by Vincenzo Pietropaolo.

Ruth Goodwin and Courtney Ch'ng Lancaster are two of the "random" actors in 52 Pick-Up. Photo by Vincenzo Pietropaolo.

  • Toronto Centre for the Arts (5040 Yonge Street)
  • All day

With so many sold-out shows at this year’s Toronto Fringe Festival, there were plenty of people who didn’t get to see many of Torontoist‘s top picks. Not to worry: as they have for several years now, the Toronto Centre for the Arts is presenting Best of Fringe, a two-week additional run for some of the most popular shows at this year’s festival, including Theatre Brouhaha’s Punch-Up, Pea Green Theatre’s Three Men in a Boat, and The Howland Company’s 52 Pick-Up. We strongly suggest double billing shows over an evening (each show runs about an hour) and buying tickets well in advance, as each show gets only three performances.

Details: Best of Fringe 2014

Terry O’Neill: The Man Who Shot the Sixties

Elton John entertaining the masses. Photo by Terry O'Neill.

Elton John entertaining the masses. Photo by Terry O'Neill.

  • Izzy Gallery (106 Yorkville Avenue)
  • 11 a.m.

Our fascination with fame and celebrity isn’t new—and this is illustrated in Izzy Gallery’s newest exhibit, Terry O’Neil: The Man Who Shot the Sixties. A photographer from the U.K., O’Neill snapped iconic shots of everyone from The Beatles and Rolling Stones to Brigitte Bardot and Faye Dunaway. The opening party features an appearance by O’Neill himself, and his “photographs from the frontline of fame” will remain on display until the end of August.

Details: Terry O’Neill: The Man Who Shot the Sixties

Dancing on the Pier

  • Harbourfront Centre (235 Queens Quay West)
  • 7 p.m.

If the warm weather makes you feel like dancing, well, Harbourfront is where you need to be. Get your groove on every Thursday until the end of summer at Dancing on the Pier. Live music from the likes of the Toronto All-Star Big Band, Sean Bellaviti, and Luis Orbegoso will provide the soundtrack to each themed evening. Got two left feet? No problem! Instructors will be on hand to get your steps in order.

Details: Dancing on the Pier

Music in the Garden

  • Toronto Music Garden (479 Queens Quay West)
  • 7 p.m.

There’s bound to be a lot of barbecuing, beaching, and boozing around the city this summer, so we’d like to suggest something a little more refined to keep things balanced. The Music in the Garden series features weekly performances by a variety of unique musical groups, amid the luscious greenery of the Toronto Music Garden. The Akwesasne Women Singers start things off on July 3 with a showcase of English and Mohawk songs, followed by Music from the Garden of India (July 24), an all-female fiddling supergroup (July 31), the Nagata Shachu taiko drumming ensemble (August 21), the Veretski Pass Trio (September 4), and many more.

Details: Music in the Garden

Porch View Dances

Photo by Diana Renelli.

Photo by Diana Renelli.

  • 7 p.m.

Since 2012, Kaeja d’Dance has been working with families in Seaton Village to develop Porch View Dances, an evening of choreographed works inspired by the neighbourhood and families themselves. You’ll be guided through site-specific performances on and around the porches, streets, and alleyways of the Village, culminating in a final public performance. Whether you live in the neighbourhood or want to explore a new one, Kaeja d’Dance provides a rare opportunity to see a community choreographed.

Details: Porch View Dances

Spamalot

  • Lower Ossington Theatre (100 Ossington Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

Fans of oddball British humour—rejoice! The Lower Ossington Theatre has brought the genius of Monty Python’s Eric Idle to Toronto with their rendition of Spamalot. Watch as flying cows, killer rabbits, and all sorts of bizarre elements come together to tell a twisted version of the legendary story of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.

Details: Spamalot