Beerprov

Left to Right, improvisers Sean Tabares, Colin Munch, and Ned Petrie crack jokes and beers at a past edition of Beerprov. Photo by Caleigh Le Grand.

Left to Right, improvisers Sean Tabares, Colin Munch, and Ned Petrie crack jokes and beers at a past edition of Beerprov. Photo by Caleigh Le Grand.

  • Comedy Bar (945 Bloor Street West)
  • 10:30 p.m.

The competitive elimination comedy-slash-drinking show returns with past champs, rising stars, and seasoned comics/drinkers looking to take the Beerprov trophy. The dozen contestants this time around include The National Theatre of the World’s Naomi Snieckus; Sex T-Rex’s Colin Munch; and Cassie Moes, winner of last month’s “minor league” edition, The Draft. (A new edition of The Draft will also take place on Thursday, May 29, at Comedy Bar.)

Details: Beerprov

Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

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  • Royal Ontario Museum (100 Queens Park)
  • All day

If The Forbidden City: Inside the Court of China’s Emperors has a mascot, it’s Emperor Yongzheng. The image of the 18th-century Chinese ruler dominates the promotional material of the exhibition, which is one of the centrepieces of the Royal Ontario Museum’s centennial year. His portrait certainly has visual appeal, but Yongzheng is also a figure associated with surprising elements of life within the former imperial palace.

Details: A Journey Into the Forbidden City

Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

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  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

“The greatest art always returns you to the vulnerabilities of the human situation.” – Francis Bacon

“In the human figure one can express more completely one’s feelings about the world than in any other way.” – Henry Moore

These quotations, which welcome visitors to Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty,” immediately establish the exhibition’s tone and focus. Each artist’s distortions of the human figure, shaped by their wartime experiences, capture the vulnerability of our mortal forms.

Details: Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

Inside Out: Challenging Attitudes and Changing Lives

Still from Tom at the Farm.

Still from Tom at the Farm.

  • Multiple venues
  • All day

Now in its 24th year, the Inside Out festival offers an eclectic mix of LGBT-themed films from Canada and around the world. Setting up shop at venues ranging from the TIFF Bell Lightbox to Videofag, the festival mixes screenings, panel discussions, and receptions for equal parts edification and entertainment—all in the name of “challenging attitudes and changing lives.”

Details: Inside Out: Challenging Attitudes and Changing Lives

The Last Confession

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 2 p.m., 8 p.m.

If you’re in the mood for a murder mystery with a religious twist, you’ll want to check out The Last Confession. David Suchet (Poirot) and Richard O’Callaghan star in this play about the mysterious death of Pope John Paul I in 1978. After only 33 days in office, and having warned three cardinals that they would be replaced, he is found dead. Though the Vatican refuses to open an official investigation, Cardinal Benelli goes out in search of the truth.

Details: The Last Confession

Toronto Festival of Clowns

Jordan Campbell and Daniel Henkel star in Adventure Time as part of the Toronto Festival of Clowns. Image courtesy of the Toronto Festival of Clowns.

Jordan Campbell and Daniel Henkel star in Adventure Time as part of the Toronto Festival of Clowns. Image courtesy of the Toronto Festival of Clowns.

  • Multiple venues
  • 6:30 p.m.

This post is going to upset as many people as it will intrigue, but here goes! The Toronto Festival of Clowns is back for its ninth year of painting the town’s noses red, bringing five days of performance art. These aren’t your typical birthday clowns; programming at the Pia Boulman School and the Brockton Collective ranges from bouffon acts to dating games and from dramatic pieces to puppet shows, and will feature special appearances by Morro and Jasp, and Mullet the Zombie Clown.

Details: Toronto Festival of Clowns

Vitals: Immersive Theatre That’s Close to Home

Katherine Cullen in Vitals. Photo by Michael Barlas.

Katherine Cullen in Vitals. Photo by Michael Barlas.

  • 149 Roncesvalles Avenue (149 Roncesvalles Avenue)
  • 11:45 a.m., 7:15 p.m.

Outside the March seems to be Toronto’s favourite indie theatre company. Director Mitchell Cushman built up quite a buzz after consecutive hits Mr. Marmalade and Terminus, both of which were praised for their unconventional use of space (the former was set in a kindergarten classroom, the latter placed both the actors and the audience on the stage of the Royal Alexandra Theatre), so his next project had been highly anticipated. Vitals, written by Rosamund Small, was the first script for Outside the March developed specifically for a site-specific space, and its original run had to be extended even before opening night. Then, only a few days into the run, it was extended again to June 1. And though Vitals isn’t the best show in Outside the March’s history, there’s a reason that tickets have been flying.

Details: Vitals: Immersive Theatre That’s Close to Home

Love and Human Remains

  • Unit 102 Theatre (376 Dufferin Street)
  • 8 p.m.

If we’ve learned anything from slasher flicks, it’s that having sex leads to death. Returning to the stage to mark its 25th anniversary, Brad Fraser’s Love and Human Remains pursues this dark train of thought. Set in Edmonton, the play tells the story of a bunch of sexually frustrated and dysfunctional twenty- and thirty-somethings grappling with life and love, while a killer lurks in their midst.

Details: Love and Human Remains

Flashdance—The Musical

Jillian Mueller as Alex Owens in Flashdance—The Musical. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

Jillian Mueller as Alex Owens in Flashdance—The Musical. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

  • Ed Mirvish Theatre (244 Victoria Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

Few fads have stood the test of time quite so well as dance movies from the 1980s. Now, one of the best films from this era has been adapted for the stage. Flashdance—The Musical revisits the story of a young female steel welder with a desire to dance, set to a score of iconic songs such as “Flashdance… What a Feeling,” “Maniac,” “I Love Rock and Roll,” and many more.

Details: Flashdance—The Musical