Camp Tech: Social Media Advanced

  • Centre for Social Innovation (215 Spadina Avenue)
  • 6 p.m.

In case you were unaware, sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter are useful for things beyond stalking your ex and perusing cat pictures. If you have a basic knowledge of the programs and are ready to take things to the next level, join Camp Tech’s Social Media Advanced workshop. Learn about the marketing ideas behind our favourite social sites and the ways you can use them to promote your business effectively. Your own computer is not required for this course, but please register in advance.

Details: Camp Tech: Social Media Advanced

Shakespeare Challenge: Twelfth Night

Can a bunch of regular Joes pull off a Shakespeare production? Image courtesy of the Shakespeare Challenge.

Can a bunch of regular Joes pull off a Shakespeare production? Image courtesy of the Shakespeare Challenge.

  • Shakespeare in Action (570 Shaw Street)
  • 7 p.m.

Eight brave souls, inexperienced in theatre, will wind up on stage for this month’s Shakespeare Challenge to raise funds in support of literacy and the arts in less-fortunate communities. Join them as they courageously take on an abridged version of Twelfth Night. They might be surprisingly awesome, or it could be a trainwreck. Either way, it’s bound to be entertaining!

Details: Shakespeare Challenge: Twelfth Night

Love and Human Remains

  • Unit 102 Theatre (376 Dufferin Street)
  • 8 p.m.

If we’ve learned anything from slasher flicks, it’s that having sex leads to death. Returning to the stage to mark its 25th anniversary, Brad Fraser’s Love and Human Remains pursues this dark train of thought. Set in Edmonton, the play tells the story of a bunch of sexually frustrated and dysfunctional twenty- and thirty-somethings grappling with life and love, while a killer lurks in their midst.

Details: Love and Human Remains

Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

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While the Toronto International Film Festival may have shifted into a more relaxed mode, it’s still offering plenty of opportunities to gawk at movie stars—they’re just a little more spread out. Midweek, fans could catch the premieres of Good Kill (Ethan Hawke as a drone pilot), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg’s new bit of oddness), The Imitation Game (Benedict Cumberbatch as World War II cryptographer Alan Turing), Jauja (Viggo Mortensen, and we don’t know much else really), Laggies (Sam Rockwell and Keira Knightley in a comedy about people taking their sweet time to grow up), October Gale (Patricia Clarkson and Scott Speedman in a thriller/drama set in a remote cabin), Pawn Sacrifice (about the chess duels between Boris Spassky and Bobby Fischer), The Cobbler (Adam Sandler’s latest) and Escobar (Benicio Del Toro is the famous drug kingpin).


Want more TIFF coverage? Torontoist‘s film festival hub is right over here.
Details: TIFF 2014 Scenes: Tuesday–Thursday Nights, Featuring Good Kill, Maps to the Stars, The Imitation Game, Jauja, Laggies, and More

Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

20140402-AGO - Francis Bacon and Henry Moore-159-17
  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

“The greatest art always returns you to the vulnerabilities of the human situation.” – Francis Bacon

“In the human figure one can express more completely one’s feelings about the world than in any other way.” – Henry Moore

These quotations, which welcome visitors to Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty,” immediately establish the exhibition’s tone and focus. Each artist’s distortions of the human figure, shaped by their wartime experiences, capture the vulnerability of our mortal forms.

Details: Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

Vitals: Immersive Theatre That’s Close to Home

Katherine Cullen in Vitals. Photo by Michael Barlas.

Katherine Cullen in Vitals. Photo by Michael Barlas.

  • 149 Roncesvalles Avenue (149 Roncesvalles Avenue)
  • 7:15 p.m.

Outside the March seems to be Toronto’s favourite indie theatre company. Director Mitchell Cushman built up quite a buzz after consecutive hits Mr. Marmalade and Terminus, both of which were praised for their unconventional use of space (the former was set in a kindergarten classroom, the latter placed both the actors and the audience on the stage of the Royal Alexandra Theatre), so his next project had been highly anticipated. Vitals, written by Rosamund Small, was the first script for Outside the March developed specifically for a site-specific space, and its original run had to be extended even before opening night. Then, only a few days into the run, it was extended again to June 1. And though Vitals isn’t the best show in Outside the March’s history, there’s a reason that tickets have been flying.

Details: Vitals: Immersive Theatre That’s Close to Home

Of Human Bondage Is Striking, but Not Subtle

Dan Chameroy, Gregory Prest, and Oliver Dennis in front of living portraits Raquel Duffy, Sarah Wilson, and Courtney Ch'ng Lancaster. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Dan Chameroy, Gregory Prest, and Oliver Dennis in front of living portraits Raquel Duffy, Sarah Wilson, and Courtney Ch'ng Lancaster. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

As the world premiere of a stage adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham’s famous novel, Soulpepper Theatre’s production of Of Human Bondage is the jewel of the company’s 2014 season. Not that it’s a perfect play—but it does flex the strength of Soulpepper’s acting ensemble, design team, and, well, budget. The arresting opening scene sees the play’s main character, Philip Carey, well-played by Gregory Prest, enter by rising through a trapdoor centre stage while other members of the cast appear to dissect a cadaver (they’re actually crossing bows across a double bass, which is lying horizontally on an operating table). A spotlight casts Philip’s shadow against a red-brick wall, so that the bows appear to saw through his stiff, upright body. Setting the tone for the rest of the production, the scene is striking, but not incredibly subtle.

Details: Of Human Bondage Is Striking, but Not Subtle

The Last Confession

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 2 p.m., 8 p.m.

If you’re in the mood for a murder mystery with a religious twist, you’ll want to check out The Last Confession. David Suchet (Poirot) and Richard O’Callaghan star in this play about the mysterious death of Pope John Paul I in 1978. After only 33 days in office, and having warned three cardinals that they would be replaced, he is found dead. Though the Vatican refuses to open an official investigation, Cardinal Benelli goes out in search of the truth.

Details: The Last Confession

A God in Need of Help Gets Some From Its Friends

From back to front: Ben Irvine, Daniel Kash, Tony Nappo, Jonathan Seinen, Dmitry Chepovetsky, and Alden Adair. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

From back to front: Ben Irvine, Daniel Kash, Tony Nappo, Jonathan Seinen, Dmitry Chepovetsky, and Alden Adair. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

We’re nearing the end of Tarragon Theatre‘s 2013/2014 season, and it appears we’ve also arrived at the final stage of its theme: love, loss, wine, and the gods. But that doesn’t mean the Tarragon, which has seen some major hits this year in Lungs, The Double, and The Ugly One, is phoning it in. Sean Dixon’s ambitious new script, A God in Need of Help, has produced not only one of the longer plays in the Tarragon season, but also easily the most dense and layered, mixing as it does historical fact and fiction with timeless issues of art, religion, and politics. Fortunately, that makes it the strongest mainstage show of the season thus far (we’ll see how Tarragon’s final show, The God That Comes, co-created by and featuring Hawksley Workman, performs in June).

Details: A God in Need of Help Gets Some From Its Friends