Get to Know Google Analytics

  • Centre for Social Innovation (215 Spadina Avenue)
  • 6 p.m.

All those junk emails blabbing on about SEOs and web traffic actually make a good point—it’s important to know and understand your website’s stats to unlock its full potential. If this all seems a little overwhelming, consider enrolling in Camp Tech’s Get to Know Google Analytics course. Instructor Adam Green will take you through the basics of the program and show you how to make filters, pull reports, and more. Please register in advance. Attendees are required to bring their own computer and power cord.

Details: Get to Know Google Analytics

Toronto Geek Trivia

  • TRANZAC (292 Brunswick Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

You’ve got a penchant for the nerdier side of life, with a head full of random facts, and Toronto Geek Trivia thinks that’s pretty cool. Round up a few of your smartest friends and prepare to go up against other self-professed geeks in an evening of brain-straining trivia. Not only will there be pizza and drinks available, but contestants will be eligible to win tickets to Bad Dog Theatre Company’s Final Frontier, a Black Museum lecture, and The Amazing Spiderman 2.

Details: Toronto Geek Trivia

Little Terrors Vol. 27: Hidden Fear

  • Carlton Cinemas (20 Carlton Street)
  • 9 p.m.

Whether you like scoping out promising newcomers to the horror industry or can handle scares only in small doses, Little Terrors is the right movie night for you. Vol. 27: Hidden Fear features eight films that are short on time, but big on gore. This month’s lineup includes Walter Don’t Dance, starring Rider Strong and Monica Keena (you know, from your favourite ’90s shows), Jeff Brown’s Sulfuric, and Tasha & Friends—an award winning piece from last year’s Blood in the Snow Canadian Film Festival.

Details: Little Terrors Vol. 27: Hidden Fear

Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

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  • Royal Ontario Museum (100 Queens Park)
  • All day

If The Forbidden City: Inside the Court of China’s Emperors has a mascot, it’s Emperor Yongzheng. The image of the 18th-century Chinese ruler dominates the promotional material of the exhibition, which is one of the centrepieces of the Royal Ontario Museum’s centennial year. His portrait certainly has visual appeal, but Yongzheng is also a figure associated with surprising elements of life within the former imperial palace.

Details: A Journey Into the Forbidden City

Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

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  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

“The greatest art always returns you to the vulnerabilities of the human situation.” – Francis Bacon

“In the human figure one can express more completely one’s feelings about the world than in any other way.” – Henry Moore

These quotations, which welcome visitors to Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty,” immediately establish the exhibition’s tone and focus. Each artist’s distortions of the human figure, shaped by their wartime experiences, capture the vulnerability of our mortal forms.

Details: Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

Playwright Project

  • The Downstage (798 Danforth Avenue)
  • 7 p.m.

Every year, Playwright Project brings theatre lovers together to celebrate one deserving writer. This year, Caryl Churchill’s works will get the spotlight treatment for two weeks at The Downstage. Vinegar Tom, A Number, Drunk Enough to Say I Love You, and Three More Sleepless Nights will each be showcased several times throughout the festival.

Details: Playwright Project

The Gigli Concert: Therapy Through Music, Comedy, and Sex Stories

Diego Matamoros and Stuart Hughes as JPW King and Irish Man. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Diego Matamoros and Stuart Hughes as JPW King and Irish Man. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Up until Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez made that movie, the word “Gigli” was associated with images of beauty, the splendour of the opera, and, more specifically, the renowned Italian tenor Beniamino Gigli. In Irish playwright Tom Murphy’s The Gigli Concert, originally written in 1983 and on stage now at Soulpepper Theatre, the singer’s voice represents not only beauty, but hope itself—the one saving force that can pull its two central characters from deep depressions. And, thankfully, the journey to the other side is infinitely more watchable than the previously mentioned Hollywood film.

Details: The Gigli Concert: Therapy Through Music, Comedy, and Sex Stories

Abigail’s Party

Claire Burns (left) and Anna Hardwick (right) in Abagail's Party. Photo by Daniel Notarianni.

Claire Burns (left) and Anna Hardwick (right) in Abagail's Party. Photo by Daniel Notarianni.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Backspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

It’s 1977, and a group of friends in England are gathering for a soirée. A pretty standard concept, that’s for sure, but Mike Leigh’s Abigail’s Party takes things to another level with a playful romp through the lives of these suburban socialites. Witness the hilarity and awkwardness as the hostess from hell metaphorically tears her guests to pieces.

Details: Abigail’s Party

Belleville

  • Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street)
  • 1:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Zack and Abby are the couple that others envy—the ones who seem to have it all. But secrets hide behind the beautiful home, the loving marriage, and the promising careers. Company Theatre’s Belleville—produced in association with Canadian Stage—explores the darkness that’s revealed in this seemingly perfect relationship after Abby finds her husband at home one day when he’s supposed to be at work.

Details: Belleville

The Last Confession

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

David Suchet and Richard O’Callaghan star in The Last Confession. Photo by John Haines.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 2 p.m., 8 p.m.

If you’re in the mood for a murder mystery with a religious twist, you’ll want to check out The Last Confession. David Suchet (Poirot) and Richard O’Callaghan star in this play about the mysterious death of Pope John Paul I in 1978. After only 33 days in office, and having warned three cardinals that they would be replaced, he is found dead. Though the Vatican refuses to open an official investigation, Cardinal Benelli goes out in search of the truth.

Details: The Last Confession

Soliciting Temptation: First Impressions and Misguided Missions

Derek Boyes and Miriam Fernandes in Soliciting Temptation by Erin Shields. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Derek Boyes and Miriam Fernandes in Soliciting Temptation by Erin Shields. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Tarragon Theatre, Extra Space (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

Erin Shields’ Soliciting Temptation, premiering now at Tarragon Theatre, was highly anticipated—it’s the first new play since 2010 from the eminent female playwright, known for the Governor General Award-winning If We Were Birds. In some respects, it lives up to the hype. It deals with the difficult, often-overlooked subject of child sex tourism, and it does so thoughtfully and with nuance. The overall experience, though, is somewhat underwhelming, because the compelling ideas explored are undercut by an implausible premise.

Details: Soliciting Temptation: First Impressions and Misguided Missions

Beatrice & Virgil: Yann Martel’s Monkey and Donkey Hit the Stage

Damien Atkins as Henry, peering at a taxidermied donkey and ape, Beatrice and Virgil. Photo by Joanna Akyol.

Damien Atkins as Henry, peering at a taxidermied donkey and ape, Beatrice and Virgil. Photo by Joanna Akyol.

  • Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Most unsolicited messages from admirers to famous writers do not result in collaborations: but when Lindsay Cochrane, kindergarten teacher and English literature grad, emailed Yann Martel, the acclaimed author of Life of Pi, about adapting one of his novels into a stage play, the two ended up joining forces. The result is Cochrane’s first play, Beatrice & Virgil, on now at Factory Theatre (in a co-production with Ottawa’s National Arts Centre). With the help of director Sarah Garton Stanley, Cochrane has made an impressively valiant effort to wrangle some large, abstract, and troublesome ideas into a well-crafted work of live theatre.

Details: Beatrice & Virgil: Yann Martel’s Monkey and Donkey Hit the Stage

A God in Need of Help Gets Some From Its Friends

From back to front: Ben Irvine, Daniel Kash, Tony Nappo, Jonathan Seinen, Dmitry Chepovetsky, and Alden Adair. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

From back to front: Ben Irvine, Daniel Kash, Tony Nappo, Jonathan Seinen, Dmitry Chepovetsky, and Alden Adair. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

We’re nearing the end of Tarragon Theatre‘s 2013/2014 season, and it appears we’ve also arrived at the final stage of its theme: love, loss, wine, and the gods. But that doesn’t mean the Tarragon, which has seen some major hits this year in Lungs, The Double, and The Ugly One, is phoning it in. Sean Dixon’s ambitious new script, A God in Need of Help, has produced not only one of the longer plays in the Tarragon season, but also easily the most dense and layered, mixing as it does historical fact and fiction with timeless issues of art, religion, and politics. Fortunately, that makes it the strongest mainstage show of the season thus far (we’ll see how Tarragon’s final show, The God That Comes, co-created by and featuring Hawksley Workman, performs in June).

Details: A God in Need of Help Gets Some From Its Friends