Tassels and Tabletop 7: Attack of the Killer Bs

Catch Bianca Boom Boom at Tassels and Tabletops. Photo by Chris Hutcheson.

Catch Bianca Boom Boom at Tassels and Tabletops. Photo by Chris Hutcheson.

  • The Central (603 Markham Street)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Smart and sexy will collide for one special night, courtesy of Nerd Girl Burlesque. Tassels and Tabletop 7: Attack of the Killer Bs is busting with burlesque boys and babes who all have names starting with B. Get hot with performances by Belle Jumelles, Bianca Boom Boom, and Boy Joystick, and then spend the rest of your evening playing board games. Some will be provided, but attendees are welcome to bring their own favourites as well.

Details: Tassels and Tabletop 7: Attack of the Killer Bs

Community Trivia Night

  • Office Pub (117 John Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Your friends may be buying homes, getting married, and having babies, but you know a crapload about TV, and you should be proud. Bring your big brain of somewhat useless knowledge to Community Trivia Night and be rewarded! Besides the exciting rounds of trivia based on the show, there will be a screening of the top three favourite episodes, and a costume contest (dress as your favourite character, naturally).

Details: Community Trivia Night

Camera Bar Launches New Monthly Screening Series

Photo by Ian Muttoo, from the Torontoist Flickr pool.

Photo by Ian Muttoo, from the Torontoist Flickr pool.

  • Stephen Bulger Gallery (1026 Queen Street West)
  • 8 p.m.

When Atom Egoyan gave up creative control of Camera Bar to the adjoining Stephen Bulger Gallery in 2006, many wondered whether the small 50-seat theatre had a future amongst the other repertory cinemas the city has to offer. It has operated in a limited capacity by offering free films on Saturday afternoons and through being rented out for private events, but the folks at The Seventh Art and MDFF are hoping that a new monthly screening series will help transform the theatre into something more in keeping with Egoyan’s original vision.

Details: Camera Bar Launches New Monthly Screening Series

Ongoing…

A Journey Into the Forbidden City

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While the Toronto International Film Festival may have shifted into a more relaxed mode, it’s still offering plenty of opportunities to gawk at movie stars—they’re just a little more spread out. Midweek, fans could catch the premieres of Good Kill (Ethan Hawke as a drone pilot), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg’s new bit of oddness), The Imitation Game (Benedict Cumberbatch as World War II cryptographer Alan Turing), Jauja (Viggo Mortensen, and we don’t know much else really), Laggies (Sam Rockwell and Keira Knightley in a comedy about people taking their sweet time to grow up), October Gale (Patricia Clarkson and Scott Speedman in a thriller/drama set in a remote cabin), Pawn Sacrifice (about the chess duels between Boris Spassky and Bobby Fischer), The Cobbler (Adam Sandler’s latest) and Escobar (Benicio Del Toro is the famous drug kingpin).


Want more TIFF coverage? Torontoist‘s film festival hub is right over here.
Details: TIFF 2014 Scenes: Tuesday–Thursday Nights, Featuring Good Kill, Maps to the Stars, The Imitation Game, Jauja, Laggies, and More

Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

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  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

“The greatest art always returns you to the vulnerabilities of the human situation.” – Francis Bacon

“In the human figure one can express more completely one’s feelings about the world than in any other way.” – Henry Moore

These quotations, which welcome visitors to Francis Bacon and Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty,” immediately establish the exhibition’s tone and focus. Each artist’s distortions of the human figure, shaped by their wartime experiences, capture the vulnerability of our mortal forms.

Details: Vulnerability, Suffering, and Strength

Paprika Festival

The 2014 Paprika Festival Creator's Unit. Photo by David Leyes.

The 2014 Paprika Festival Creator's Unit. Photo by David Leyes.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • All day

A week of performing arts programming created by artists 21 and under, The Paprika Festival features readings, theatre and dance performances, and social events that aim to encourage youth involvement in the arts and foster the creation of art by young people. The festival boasts many alumni in the arts and arts-related fields, and this year’s crop of budding writers, directors, and performers may give young-at-heart attendees a glimpse of future Dora-winning work. There’s a double bill of workshopped shows each night of the week, with readings beforehand and late-night cabaret programming afterward. Over the festival’s closing weekend, the evenings turn into full days of arts events. All main-stage shows are $5; unlimited access festival passes can be purchased for $50. Many events are free of charge. For the full programming schedule, consult the festival’s website.

Details: Paprika Festival

The Gigli Concert: Therapy Through Music, Comedy, and Sex Stories

Diego Matamoros and Stuart Hughes as JPW King and Irish Man. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Diego Matamoros and Stuart Hughes as JPW King and Irish Man. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m.

Up until Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez made that movie, the word “Gigli” was associated with images of beauty, the splendour of the opera, and, more specifically, the renowned Italian tenor Beniamino Gigli. In Irish playwright Tom Murphy’s The Gigli Concert, originally written in 1983 and on stage now at Soulpepper Theatre, the singer’s voice represents not only beauty, but hope itself—the one saving force that can pull its two central characters from deep depressions. And, thankfully, the journey to the other side is infinitely more watchable than the previously mentioned Hollywood film.

Details: The Gigli Concert: Therapy Through Music, Comedy, and Sex Stories

Arrabal

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

  • Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Told through South American music and dance, Arrabal is the story of a young girl desperate to find out what happened to her father after the Argentine military made him disappear when she was just a baby. Her search leads her to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires, where she discovers both the truth, and herself.

Details: Arrabal

Belleville

  • Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street)
  • 1:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Zack and Abby are the couple that others envy—the ones who seem to have it all. But secrets hide behind the beautiful home, the loving marriage, and the promising careers. Company Theatre’s Belleville—produced in association with Canadian Stage—explores the darkness that’s revealed in this seemingly perfect relationship after Abby finds her husband at home one day when he’s supposed to be at work.

Details: Belleville

Asian Music Series

  • Multiple venues
  • 8 p.m.

Small World Music Society is celebrating Asian and South Asian Heritage Month with the Asian Music Series. Zakir Hussain and Masters of Percussion, Sultans of String, Jonita Gandhi, and Shafqat Amanat Ali are among the many talented artists who will perform in venues across the city throughout April and May.

Details: Asian Music Series

Dinner With Goebbels

  • Red Sandcastle Theatre (922 Queen Street East)
  • 8 p.m.

We’ll bet you’ve never had a dinner party quite as interesting as this one. Mark Leith invites you to sit down with the founder of political spin, Edward Bernays; the inventor of propaganda, Dr. Joseph Goebbels; and the spearhead of the war on terror, Karl Rove—in the Act 2 Studio Works production of Dinner With Goebbels.

Details: Dinner With Goebbels

Let the Cock Fight Begin

Jessica Greenberg and Andrew Kushnir in Mike Bartlett's Cock. Photo by Kari North.

Jessica Greenberg and Andrew Kushnir in Mike Bartlett's Cock. Photo by Kari North.

  • The Theatre Centre (1115 Queen Street West)
  • 1:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

Despite its provocative title, there’s actually very little that’s controversial about Mike Bartlett’s Cock, making its Canadian premiere at the Theatre Centre. Its subject matter might have been viewed as more controversial in 2009, when the play premiered at the Royal Court in London—but after five years, this story of a love triangle between two men and a woman has lost part of its taboo-challenging appeal. Luckily, though, its emotional appeal has endured.

Details: Let the Cock Fight Begin

Soliciting Temptation: First Impressions and Misguided Missions

Derek Boyes and Miriam Fernandes in Soliciting Temptation by Erin Shields. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Derek Boyes and Miriam Fernandes in Soliciting Temptation by Erin Shields. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Tarragon Theatre, Extra Space (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

Erin Shields’ Soliciting Temptation, premiering now at Tarragon Theatre, was highly anticipated—it’s the first new play since 2010 from the eminent female playwright, known for the Governor General Award-winning If We Were Birds. In some respects, it lives up to the hype. It deals with the difficult, often-overlooked subject of child sex tourism, and it does so thoughtfully and with nuance. The overall experience, though, is somewhat underwhelming, because the compelling ideas explored are undercut by an implausible premise.

Details: Soliciting Temptation: First Impressions and Misguided Missions