SOUND IMAGE 2014

Broken Social Scene (Brendan Canning and Leslie Feist) Field Trip 2013. Photo by Kate Killet.

Broken Social Scene (Brendan Canning and Leslie Feist) Field Trip 2013. Photo by Kate Killet.

  • Analogue Gallery (673 Queen Street West)
  • 6 p.m.

The folks at Analogue Gallery love good photography and the local music scene, hence Sound Image 2014, their third annual music photography competition and exhibition. Fifty finalists have had their submissions selected for display in the gallery, and at the opening night party, the judges will award one of those local shutterbugs with the grand prize for their shot. You can view all submissions at the Facebook gallery, but they’ll look better on display, of course (emailed RSVPs are required to attend the opening night bash).

Details: SOUND IMAGE 2014

Long Winter: Year Two, Volume Five

Pick a Piper.

Pick a Piper.

  • The Great Hall (1087 Queen Street West)
  • 7 p.m.

It may seem hard to believe after the winter we’ve had, but winter is drawing to a close, and while we may not miss the ice and snow storms, the many cold alerts, and the shovelling and salting, there’s one thing that will be missed—and shouldn’t be missed by patrons of local performance and art. Long Winter: Year Two, Volume Five will be the final instalment of the interdisciplinary arts extravaganza taking place at every level of the Great Hall building. In the basement, Vish Khanna’s final talk show guests include hip-hop legend Maestro Fresh Wes, Olympian legend Donovan Bailey, and MP Olivia Chow (who, as of press time, had not yet declared she was running for mayor). On the main stage, bands like FIVER, Pick a Piper, and the Cancer Bats will rock out. And throughout the building, more performances will take place, like choreography by Allison Cummings, a Ghetto Gladiators exhibition, and the finale of Henri Faberge’s Fountain of Mouth residency series. It’s all PWYC, and the building will fill up quickly, so get there early.

Details: Long Winter: Year Two, Volume Five

Ongoing…

From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

Ichimaru playing the shamisen. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

Ichimaru playing the shamisen. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

  • Textile Museum of Canada (55 Centre Avenue)
  • 11 a.m.

Ichimaru—once one of Japan’s most famous geishas—left the profession in the 1930s to pursue a career in entertainment. Never really leaving her past life, she became known for adorning herself in the traditional geisha garb when performing in concert or on television. “From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru” exhibits several decades’ worth of outfits and personal effects, shedding light on the woman behind the makeup.

Details: From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

Same Same But Different

Anthony Malarky and Anita Majumdar from Same Same But Different. Photo by Michael Cooper.

Anthony Malarky and Anita Majumdar from Same Same But Different. Photo by Michael Cooper.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Bollywood is the force that brings two stories of self-exploration together in Same Same But Different. After her mother’s life is changed by a run-in with the world of Indian cinema, Aisha—a Canadian-born actress—realizes that she must face her prejudices about nationality and skin colour in order to rise to stardom.

Details: Same Same But Different

Arrabal

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

  • Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Told through South American music and dance, Arrabal is the story of a young girl desperate to find out what happened to her father after the Argentine military made him disappear when she was just a baby. Her search leads her to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires, where she discovers both the truth, and herself.

Details: Arrabal

The Metamorphosis Is a Topsy-Turvy Spectacle

Unnur Ösp Stefánsdóttir as Greta and Björn Thors as Gregor in The Metamorphosis. Photo by Simon Kane.

Unnur Ösp Stefánsdóttir as Greta and Björn Thors as Gregor in The Metamorphosis. Photo by Simon Kane.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 8 p.m.

The image most commonly associated with Franz Kafka’s most famous work, the 1915 novella The Metamorphosis, is that of a giant insect trapped inside a bare, dirty room with a rotting apple lodged in his back—the bug was formerly a man named Gregor Samsa, and the room was formerly his bedroom. As we all know, this distressing and inexplicable transformation from man to bug happened in an instant, although its emotional and literary after-effects have been haunting English students ever since.

The stage adaptation of The Metamorphosis by the Icelandic company Vesturport Theatre and London’s Lyric Hammersmith, on now at the Royal Alexandra Theatre with Mirvish Productions, is much more watchable than this introduction would suggest. The only bug you’ll see in this version is a trick of light and shadow. And that’s not the only trick up this show’s sleeve (or perhaps antenna?).

Details: The Metamorphosis Is a Topsy-Turvy Spectacle

The Wanderers

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street)
  • 8 p.m.

You can be taken out of a war, but can you truly remove the war from within you? This question is posed in Kawa Ada’s The Wanderers, a Buddies in Bad Times production about a father and son who flee a battle-worn Afghanistan. Though they start a new life in Canada, the horrors from their homeland refuse to be left behind.

Details: The Wanderers

TOsketchfest

  • Multiple venues
  • 8 p.m.

The Toronto Sketch Comedy Festival (TOsketchfest) returns for its 9th year to promote the best of scripted live comedy, with a lineup of over 40 troupes from across North America. Not to be missed are the live reading of Kids In The Hall: Brain Candy, a headlining performance of Gavin Crawford’s Sh**ting Rainbows, or the Slings and Arrows panel with Mark McKinney, Susan Coyne, and Bob Martin.

Details: TOsketchfest

Lungs Is a Breath of Fresh Air

Brendan Gall and Lesley Faulkner in Lungs at Tarragon Theatre. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Brendan Gall and Lesley Faulkner in Lungs at Tarragon Theatre. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

In Duncan Macmillan’s Lungs, on now at the Tarragon Theatre Extraspace, two people—a man and a woman in their late twenties to mid-thirties—stand on an empty stage and talk. They talk at each other, mostly, about themselves and about more abstract thoughts, as time shifts in the script propel them from pivotal moment to pivotal moment. It’s a style of theatre that can go wrong in an instant—but it can also produce a work that invigorates, or even inspires, a passion for the art form.

Fortunately, this one does the latter.

Details: Lungs Is a Breath of Fresh Air