Cinema Politica: Mars at Sunrise

A scene of imprisonment. Image courtesy of Mars at Sunrise.

A scene of imprisonment. Image courtesy of Mars at Sunrise.

  • Bloor Hot Docs Cinema (506 Bloor Street West)
  • 6:30 p.m.

Cinema Politica takes a look at the power of art in Mars at Sunrise. This abstract film follows the struggles of two artists on opposite sides of Israel’s militarized borders, and explores the ways creativity can sustain one’s body and spirit in even the most treacherous of situations.

Details: Cinema Politica: Mars at Sunrise

TV Trivia Night: Degrassi

The kids of Degrassi. Image courtesy of Playing With Time Productions.

The kids of Degrassi. Image courtesy of Playing With Time Productions.

  • Gladstone Hotel (1214 Queen Street West)
  • 7 p.m.

You were there for the first times, the heartbreaks, the pregnancies, and a whole lot of other awkward teenage situations. Now, harness those memories and turn them into prizes and prestige with the Degrassi edition of TV Trivia Night. Form a team of six people and get ready to answer a slew of questions in the form of skits, audio clues, and straight-up trivia. Special treats are in store for those who come dressed up (and really, how can you resist the ’80s fashions?).

Details: TV Trivia Night: Degrassi

Terrific Women

  • The Ossington (61 Ossington Avenue)
  • 9 p.m.

Your two favourite ’70s feminists are back for another round of Terrific Women. Presented in the style of a cable access program, the night of sketch and stand-up comedy sees comediennes Steph Kaliner and Sara Hennessey welcome many of their funny friends, including Carolyn Taylor, Dawn Whitwell, Lianne Mouladin, David Dineen-Porter, Nigel Grinstead, Joel Buxton, and DJ Demmers.

Details: Terrific Women

Ongoing…

The Guggenheim Comes to the AGO

20131126-AGO The Great Upheaval- Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection-2168- Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

Virginia Woolf once remarked that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” Whether it actually did is debatable, but the curators of “The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection 1910–1918” use that year to start their exhibition of works from a tumultuous decade of innovation in European fine art.

Details: The Guggenheim Comes to the AGO

From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

Ichimaru playing the shamisen. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

Ichimaru playing the shamisen. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

  • Textile Museum of Canada (55 Centre Avenue)
  • 11 a.m.

Ichimaru—once one of Japan’s most famous geishas—left the profession in the 1930s to pursue a career in entertainment. Never really leaving her past life, she became known for adorning herself in the traditional geisha garb when performing in concert or on television. “From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru” exhibits several decades’ worth of outfits and personal effects, shedding light on the woman behind the makeup.

Details: From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

Same Same But Different

Anthony Malarky and Anita Majumdar from Same Same But Different. Photo by Michael Cooper.

Anthony Malarky and Anita Majumdar from Same Same But Different. Photo by Michael Cooper.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Bollywood is the force that brings two stories of self-exploration together in Same Same But Different. After her mother’s life is changed by a run-in with the world of Indian cinema, Aisha—a Canadian-born actress—realizes that she must face her prejudices about nationality and skin colour in order to rise to stardom.

Details: Same Same But Different

Arrabal

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

  • Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Told through South American music and dance, Arrabal is the story of a young girl desperate to find out what happened to her father after the Argentine military made him disappear when she was just a baby. Her search leads her to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires, where she discovers both the truth, and herself.

Details: Arrabal

The Metamorphosis Is a Topsy-Turvy Spectacle

Unnur Ösp Stefánsdóttir as Greta and Björn Thors as Gregor in The Metamorphosis. Photo by Simon Kane.

Unnur Ösp Stefánsdóttir as Greta and Björn Thors as Gregor in The Metamorphosis. Photo by Simon Kane.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 8 p.m.

The image most commonly associated with Franz Kafka’s most famous work, the 1915 novella The Metamorphosis, is that of a giant insect trapped inside a bare, dirty room with a rotting apple lodged in his back—the bug was formerly a man named Gregor Samsa, and the room was formerly his bedroom. As we all know, this distressing and inexplicable transformation from man to bug happened in an instant, although its emotional and literary after-effects have been haunting English students ever since.

The stage adaptation of The Metamorphosis by the Icelandic company Vesturport Theatre and London’s Lyric Hammersmith, on now at the Royal Alexandra Theatre with Mirvish Productions, is much more watchable than this introduction would suggest. The only bug you’ll see in this version is a trick of light and shadow. And that’s not the only trick up this show’s sleeve (or perhaps antenna?).

Details: The Metamorphosis Is a Topsy-Turvy Spectacle

The Wanderers

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street)
  • 8 p.m.

You can be taken out of a war, but can you truly remove the war from within you? This question is posed in Kawa Ada’s The Wanderers, a Buddies in Bad Times production about a father and son who flee a battle-worn Afghanistan. Though they start a new life in Canada, the horrors from their homeland refuse to be left behind.

Details: The Wanderers