Winter Wonderland Nature and Heritage Hike

  • Castle Frank Subway Station (600 Bloor Street East)
  • 10 a.m.

It may not be what you’d call warm, but at least our city is pretty when coated with snow and ice. Make the best of it on a Winter Wonderland Nature and Heritage Hike. Starting at Castle Frank subway station, the guided trek will venture to Evergreen Brick Works, with frequent stops to admire the surroundings and learn about its history and ecology.

Please note: This event was originally scheduled for January 26, but has been rescheduled for February 23.

Details: Winter Wonderland Nature and Heritage Hike

Silent Sundays: Destiny

  • The Revue Cinema (400 Roncesvalles Avenue)
  • 4:15 p.m.

For one night only, the Revue will be presenting a rare yet influential piece as part of Silent Sundays. Fritz Lang’s Destiny (1921) sees Death grant a young woman three chances to save her lover’s life. To enrich this silent screening, musical accompaniment will be provided by pianist William O’Meara.

Details: Silent Sundays: Destiny

Ongoing…

The Guggenheim Comes to the AGO

20131126-AGO The Great Upheaval- Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection-2168- Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day

Virginia Woolf once remarked that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” Whether it actually did is debatable, but the curators of “The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection 1910–1918” use that year to start their exhibition of works from a tumultuous decade of innovation in European fine art.

Details: The Guggenheim Comes to the AGO

Life Is Good, When it’s This Cabaret

Photo by Seanna Kennedy.

Photo by Seanna Kennedy.

  • Lower Ossington Theatre (100 Ossington Avenue)
  • All day

It’s 1931 in Berlin, and the Nazis are on the brink of supremacy. But there remains another side to the city—one that’s decadent, permissive, and artistic. And that’s the world we meet when we’re beckoned into the extravagant and sleazy Kit Kat Klub by eccentric Emcee and his troupe of saucy dancers, performing “Willkommen.”

Cabaret’s primary plotline begins with the arrival of American writer Cliff Bradshaw (David Light). Without a real agenda, he’s come to Berlin to work on his novel and teach English. A patron of the Kit Kat Klub, he catches the eye of the star performer Sally Bowles (Kylie McMahon). A natural stunner, Sally is a bubbly young Brit with a powerhouse voice, a dancer’s grace, and a reputation for flitting from man to man like a bumblebee in a flowerbed. It’s not long before she and Cliff fall in love—though the question of whether he’ll be able to satisfy her wild side constantly hangs over their heads. The sweetness lacking in their relationship can be found in the romantic pairing of the boarding house landlord Fraulein Schneider (Adeen Ashton Fogle) and Jewish shop owner Herr Schultz (Don Berns). As appealing as they are, though, these middle-aged lovebirds are just as susceptible to trouble and heartbreak as their younger counterparts.

Details: Life Is Good, When it’s This Cabaret

Winter Farmer’s Market

  • Steam Whistle Brewing (255 Bremner Boulevard)
  • 10 a.m.

Winter might make us want to hibernate and rely solely on the stock of food in the freezer, but don’t let it! Come out to Steam Whistle’s Winter Farmer’s Market to pick up fresh fruits, vegetables, baked goods, and organic meats—all the while supporting local farmers. It’s worth venturing out into the cold, don’t you think?

Details: Winter Farmer’s Market

From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

Ichimaru playing the shamisen. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

Ichimaru playing the shamisen. Image courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

  • Textile Museum of Canada (55 Centre Avenue)
  • 11 a.m.

Ichimaru—once one of Japan’s most famous geishas—left the profession in the 1930s to pursue a career in entertainment. Never really leaving her past life, she became known for adorning herself in the traditional geisha garb when performing in concert or on television. “From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru” exhibits several decades’ worth of outfits and personal effects, shedding light on the woman behind the makeup.

Details: From Geisha to Diva: The Kimonos of Ichimaru

Heartbeat of Home

  • Ed Mirvish Theatre (244 Victoria Avenue)
  • 2 p.m.

The producers of Riverdance have spawned yet another on-stage extravaganza. With a talented cast of 38, Heartbeat of Home is a high-energy show, combining Irish, Latin, and Afro-Cuban music and dance. Torontonians get the honour of seeing the production’s North American debut—take it in before it’s gone!

Details: Heartbeat of Home

Arrabal

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

Juan Cupini and Micaela Spina star in Arrabal. Photo by Eugenio Mazzinghi.

  • Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street)
  • 2 p.m.

Told through South American music and dance, Arrabal is the story of a young girl desperate to find out what happened to her father after the Argentine military made him disappear when she was just a baby. Her search leads her to the Tango clubs of Buenos Aires, where she discovers both the truth, and herself.

Details: Arrabal

Tribes

  • Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street)
  • 2 p.m.

Even though Billy was born deaf, his family strived to raise him the same way they would have a hearing-able child. Tribes sees him learn what it is to hear and be heard when he meets Sylvia, a young woman who is gradually becoming deaf herself. Presented by A Theatrefront Production, Canadian Stage, and Theatre Aquarius, this emotional play stars Stephen Drabicki and Holly Lewis.

Details: Tribes

The Metamorphosis Is a Topsy-Turvy Spectacle

Unnur Ösp Stefánsdóttir as Greta and Björn Thors as Gregor in The Metamorphosis. Photo by Simon Kane.

Unnur Ösp Stefánsdóttir as Greta and Björn Thors as Gregor in The Metamorphosis. Photo by Simon Kane.

  • Royal Alexandra Theatre (260 King Street West)
  • 2 p.m.

The image most commonly associated with Franz Kafka’s most famous work, the 1915 novella The Metamorphosis, is that of a giant insect trapped inside a bare, dirty room with a rotting apple lodged in his back—the bug was formerly a man named Gregor Samsa, and the room was formerly his bedroom. As we all know, this distressing and inexplicable transformation from man to bug happened in an instant, although its emotional and literary after-effects have been haunting English students ever since.

The stage adaptation of The Metamorphosis by the Icelandic company Vesturport Theatre and London’s Lyric Hammersmith, on now at the Royal Alexandra Theatre with Mirvish Productions, is much more watchable than this introduction would suggest. The only bug you’ll see in this version is a trick of light and shadow. And that’s not the only trick up this show’s sleeve (or perhaps antenna?).

Details: The Metamorphosis Is a Topsy-Turvy Spectacle

The 35th Rhubarb Festival Looks Back and Forward

Laura Nanni is the director of Buddies in Bad Times Theatre's annual Rhubarb Festival (and looks fierce promoting it, too). Photo by Tanja-Tiziana.

Laura Nanni is the director of Buddies in Bad Times Theatre's annual Rhubarb Festival (and looks fierce promoting it, too). Photo by Tanja-Tiziana.

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street)
  • 2 p.m.

At 35 years old, the Rhubarb Festival at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre may be nearing middle age, but it’s still the place to go if you’re looking for experimental, boundary-breaking, not-your-theatre-next-door kind of stuff in Canada. Every February, Buddies in Bad Times warms up the Church Street neighbourhood with public works, cabarets, live performance art, and a robust lineup of emerging and established artists pushing their own limits and those of the political and cultural moment.

Festival director Laura Nanni is taking the opportunity to look at Rhubarb’s trajectory: this year’s lineup revolves around significant works of the past, and prophetic interpretations of the future. At the same time, with 34 successful years behind it, Nanni and the Rhubarb team have faced an unexpected challenge in getting the 2014 edition off the ground: a funding denial from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

We spoke to Laura Nanni to get her perspective this year’s festival, and the repercussions of the funding gap.

Details: The 35th Rhubarb Festival Looks Back and Forward

Emotional Creature

Emotional Creature features performances by  women between 13 and 19 years of age. Photo by Aliyah Guillemette, courtesy of V-Day Toronto.

Emotional Creature features performances by women between 13 and 19 years of age. Photo by Aliyah Guillemette, courtesy of V-Day Toronto.

  • Young People's Theatre (165 Front Street East)
  • 2 p.m.

V-Day Toronto has found thirteen exceptional young women between the ages of 13 and 19 to appear on stage—some in their theatrical debut—for Emotional Creature. Based on Eve Ensler’s book, I Am an Emotional Creature: The Secret Lives of Girls Around the World, the production is made up of music and spoken-word pieces inspired by the lives of girls from all over the globe.

Details: Emotional Creature

Avenue Q’s a Cure for the Blues

Princeton, Rod, and Lucy the Slut are some of the characters you'll meet on Avenue Q. Image courtesy of Avenue Q.

Princeton, Rod, and Lucy the Slut are some of the characters you'll meet on Avenue Q. Image courtesy of Avenue Q.

  • Lower Ossington Theatre (100 Ossington Avenue)
  • 4 p.m.

Let’s face it: being a twenty-something can kinda suck. Pumped full of confidence and aspirations, we flee the family nest…and fall flat on our faces. Avenue Q uses songs (written by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx) and puppetry both to lament and poke fun at this difficult time. Much like Sesame Street, it has a cast made up of human actors who interact with a variety of furry creatures, who themselves have hands up their butts. Think that description is tasteless? This might not be the show for you—these puppets are crude and lewd, and have a taste for alcohol and porn. Don’t say you weren’t warned.

Details: Avenue Q’s a Cure for the Blues

Afterplay

  • Campbell House Museum (160 Queen Street West)
  • 8 p.m., 2 p.m.

What would happen if two characters from different books were to meet up outside their narratives? This is the basis of Brian Friel’s Afterplay, which explores the hypothetical relationship between two Anton Chekhov creations—Sonya from Uncle Vanya and Andrey from Three Sisters. For the price of admission, you’ll also get to indulge in authentic Russian tea during the performance, courtesy of the Campbell House.

Details: Afterplay