TIFF Promises to Love Godard Forever

Still from Pierrot le fou.

Still from Pierrot le fou.

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

“Photography is truth,” Michel Subor’s young draft-dodger announces in Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Petit Soldat, “And cinema is truth 24 frames per second.” Though that statement is often misattributed to the French filmmaker himself rather than to his character, the sentiment seems to hold true enough for Godard. On the strength of his wide-ranging, by turns playful and socially committed, and equal parts aesthetically and politically revolutionary filmography, one might even say that Godard’s life’s work has been dedicated to elevating the cinema to the esteemed status in which philosophers hold first principles like truth.

That effort to haul the cinema out of its infancy and into a kind of artistic maturity is the subject of TIFF Cinematheque’s newest and fullest retrospective in some time, a two-season programme entitled Godard Forever, which is intended to span the length of the filmmaker’s remarkable, varied career—from the jazz-infused improvisation of Breathless to the Marxist montage of recent work like Film Socialisme. The first half of that retrospective, a fifteen-film programme dedicated to what most consider Godard’s golden age—the period from 1960′s Breathless to 1967’s apocalyptic, decade-capping Weekend—runs this season, highlighting the period in which Godard famously moulded existing genres like Hollywood gangster pictures and musicals into his own unique creations.

Details: TIFF Promises to Love Godard Forever

Descant 163: The Brink and the Break

The Girl and the Bear. Image by Vanessa McKernan.

The Girl and the Bear. Image by Vanessa McKernan.

  • Charlie's Gallery (112 Harbord Street)
  • 7 p.m.

Descant Magazine mourns endings and celebrates new beginnings with issue 163, The Brink and the Break. Join contributors George Elliott Clarke, Rocco de Giacomo, Cathy Petch, John Ryan Scrivener, Sharon Overend, and Lori Vos for the launch party, where they will be sharing their works of poetry and fiction on the topics of love, tension, and family.

Details: Descant 163: The Brink and the Break

The Original Mad Men: Lover Come Back

  • The Revue Cinema (400 Roncesvalles Avenue)
  • 7 p.m.

Before Mad Men made the ’60s ad industry look sexy, misogynistic, and rife with alcoholism, there was Lover Come Back. A 1961 film featuring Rock Hudson and Doris Day, it sees two ad agency representatives compete for a prestigious account, using very different tactics. The Revue Cinema presents a screening of this classic, followed by a discussion with industry veteran Terry O’Reilly on how the ad business is portrayed (and sometimes misrepresented) by screenwriters.

Details: The Original Mad Men: Lover Come Back

BookThugs and Troubador Slaves

  • COCO Crafted Organic Chocolates (365 Jane Street)
  • 7 p.m.

We’re going to go out on a limb and assume that you enjoy music, poetry, or chocolate (at least a little bit). Well, guess what? BookThugs and Troubador Slaves has all of these things! Aisha Sasha John, Mark Truscott, Stephen Cain, and Jay MillAr will all be reading their works, with music provided by Mark Martyre, and SoundSkapes by Michael Menegon. Let’s not forget that this will all go down at a chocolate shop, so you can indulge in homemade organic chocolates and other desserts while you enjoy the performances.

Details: BookThugs and Troubador Slaves

Arlecchino Allegro

Clown-dancers of Toronto Masque Theatre's Arlecchino Allegro. Photo by Tariq Keiran.

Clown-dancers of Toronto Masque Theatre's Arlecchino Allegro. Photo by Tariq Keiran.

  • Enoch Turner Schoolhouse (106 Trinity Street)
  • 8 p.m.

There’s a lot going on in this city, but we bet this is the only clown and chamber music fusion event you’ll find. Arlecchino Allegro, a cabaret presented by the Toronto Masque Theatre, is best described as “a glittering musical fête gone awry.” Exploring themes of love, laughter, and celebration, the show is a peculiar but amusing mixture of improv, clowns, dance, and music.

Details: Arlecchino Allegro

CineMacabre: Frankenstein Created Woman

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • 9 p.m.

For one night only, Rue Morgue is giving life to the restored Frankenstein Created Woman with their January CineMacabre screening. In one of Hammer’s more strange endeavours, Peter Cushing plays Baron Von Frankenstein. Having discovered how to isolate the human soul and transfer it between bodies, he plays God—or perhaps the devil—and transplants a wrongly executed man’s soul into his lover’s body. The result: bloody revenge. As usual, attendees will be treated to a glut of gory prizes.

Details: CineMacabre: Frankenstein Created Woman

BeerProv presents The Draft

Up-and-coming improvisors battle it out at BeerProv's The Draft. Photo courtesy of RAW Photography.

Up-and-coming improvisors battle it out at BeerProv's The Draft. Photo courtesy of RAW Photography.

  • Comedy Bar (945 Bloor Street West)
  • 9:30 p.m.

There’s improv, there’s beer, and then there’s BeerProv. A curious combination of these two fun elements, The Draft pits a slew of amateur improvisers against each other in a series of elimination games. The winner gets the distinct honour of drinking from the Mini-Mug of Champions.

Details: BeerProv presents The Draft

Ongoing…

The Guggenheim Comes to the AGO

20131126-AGO The Great Upheaval- Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection-2168- Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • Art Gallery of Ontario (317 Dundas Street West)
  • All day
Details: The Guggenheim Comes to the AGO