Cinema Politica: Ma Vie Réelle

The subjects of Cinema Politica's feature documentary, Ma Vie Réelle. Photo courtesy of Cinema Politica.

The subjects of Cinema Politica's feature documentary, Ma Vie Réelle. Photo courtesy of Cinema Politica.

  • Bloor Hot Docs Cinema (506 Bloor Street West)
  • 6:30 p.m.

For his last project, late political filmmaker Magnus Isacsson spent 18 months capturing the daily lives of four youths from Montréal-Nord. Ma Vie Réelle details the reality of growing up in a tough neighbourhood, rife with drugs, poverty, and broken families. Despite their difficult situations, Isacsson’s subjects show incredible spirit and an undying drive to escape. Cinema Politica presents the screening of this documentary, and the evening will include appearances by POV Magazine‘s Marc Glassman and other special guests.

Details: Cinema Politica: Ma Vie Réelle

Degrassi Trivia Night

  • Bar 3030 (3030 Dundas Street West)
  • 7 p.m.

This Magazine wants to take you back to the ’80s, when life was simple and teenagers got pregnant, developed eating disorders, and landed themselves in jail for drunk driving. Okay, maybe “simpler” is the wrong word, but we loved the world of Degrassi nonetheless. Now your encyclopedic knowledge of the show is required for a good cause. Degrassi Trivia Night will pit teams of four against each other, to compete for prizes and glory. Proceeds from the night will support independent journalism and publishing.

Details: Degrassi Trivia Night

The Light Between

  • Harbourfront Centre, Fleck Dance Theatre (207 Queens Quay West)
  • 8 p.m.

Margie Gillis is celebrating her 40th year as a dancer in the most appropriate fashion—with the unveiling of a new dance production. The Light Between explores the idea of transformation throughout time, touching on themes of joy, pain, and knowledge. Choreographed by Gillis herself, along with collaborators Holly Bright, Marc Daigle and Paola Styron, the show features all three performers in a series of solos, duets and trios.

Details: The Light Between

Ongoing…

The Royal Ontario Museum Takes a Modern Approach to the Cradle of Civilization

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While the Toronto International Film Festival may have shifted into a more relaxed mode, it’s still offering plenty of opportunities to gawk at movie stars—they’re just a little more spread out. Midweek, fans could catch the premieres of Good Kill (Ethan Hawke as a drone pilot), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg’s new bit of oddness), The Imitation Game (Benedict Cumberbatch as World War II cryptographer Alan Turing), Jauja (Viggo Mortensen, and we don’t know much else really), Laggies (Sam Rockwell and Keira Knightley in a comedy about people taking their sweet time to grow up), October Gale (Patricia Clarkson and Scott Speedman in a thriller/drama set in a remote cabin), Pawn Sacrifice (about the chess duels between Boris Spassky and Bobby Fischer), The Cobbler (Adam Sandler’s latest) and Escobar (Benicio Del Toro is the famous drug kingpin).


Want more TIFF coverage? Torontoist‘s film festival hub is right over here.
Details: TIFF 2014 Scenes: Tuesday–Thursday Nights, Featuring Good Kill, Maps to the Stars, The Imitation Game, Jauja, Laggies, and More

Evil Dead The Musical Returns to Toronto

Ryan Ward and Laura Tremblay in Evil Dead The Musical. Photo by David Hou.

Ryan Ward and Laura Tremblay in Evil Dead The Musical. Photo by David Hou.

  • The Randolph Theatre (736 Bathurst St.)
  • All day

Since its humble beginnings in the back room of Toronto’s Tranzac club back in 2003, Evil Dead The Musical has steadily risen in infamy as a ridiculously fun, tongue-in-cheek, gore-soaked musical experience. From those earliest shows, the musical has gone on to make an off-broadway debut, to win and be nominated for several Dora awards, and to play in dozens of cities around the world, from Montreal and Vancouver to Tokyo and Madrid. It was high time that the show make a triumphant homecoming to a stage in Toronto, and it finally has, at the Randolph Theatre.

Details: Evil Dead The Musical Returns to Toronto

TIFF’s First Major Original Exhibition Traces David Cronenberg’s Evolution

20131029-David Cronenberg - Evolution - TIFF Lightbox-3565- Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)

It’s not every day that a media tour opens with the injunction not to photograph “the sex blob,” but so began TIFF’s preview of “David Cronenberg: Evolution,” the organization’s first large-scale touring exhibition (for now, it’s stationed at the TIFF Bell Lightbox’s HSBC Gallery). It’s an exhaustive, stunning look at some of the wildest, most perverse creations of a pioneer of the body-horror genre—who also happens to be Canada’s most internationally renowned filmmaker.

Details: TIFF’s First Major Original Exhibition Traces David Cronenberg’s Evolution

The Rendezvous With Madness Film Festival Casts Mental Health Issues in a New Light

A still from Short Term 12.

A still from Short Term 12.

  • Multiple venues
  • All day

Since its inception in 1993, the Rendezvous With Madness Film Festival has delivered on its complex mandate: presenting cultural representations of mental illness and addiction and then contextualizing them through post-screening discussions. This year’s lineup might be the festival’s most stacked yet, with screenings on a range of issues and in a variety of genres.

Details: The Rendezvous With Madness Film Festival Casts Mental Health Issues in a New Light

The Norman Conquests

Soulpepper's artistic director Albert Schultz in rehearsal for The Norman Conquests. Photo by Nathan Kelly.

Soulpepper's artistic director Albert Schultz in rehearsal for The Norman Conquests. Photo by Nathan Kelly.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • All day

Like the company’s recent triumph, Angels in America, Soulpepper’s newest show, The Norman Conquests, requires multiple trips to the theatre—or a hearty constitution for a full day of marathon attendance. Unlike Angels in America, the three instalments of The Norman ConquestsTable Manners, Living Together, and Round and Round the Garden—are comic in nature and small in scope, with each instalment taking place in a different part of a couple’s house. Written by prolific British playwright Alan Ayckbourn, the three-part series features veteran members of the Soulpepper ensemble, and can be “enjoyed individually or in any combination.”

Details: The Norman Conquests

Go Hear the People Sing in Les Misérables

Ramin Karimloo will make you weep, or at least want to give him a hug, as Jean Valjean in Les Miserables. Photo by Matthew Murphy.

Ramin Karimloo will make you weep, or at least want to give him a hug, as Jean Valjean in Les Miserables. Photo by Matthew Murphy.

  • Princess of Wales Theatre (300 King Street West)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Every revolution needs a leader. And though the movement to bring the classic 1980s musical Les Misérables back to Toronto is markedly different than the quest for political accountability and social equality, it has its hero just the same. After the official opening performance at the Princess of Wales Theatre, the audience likely would have followed London-based, Richmond Hill-raised performer Ramin Karimloo (as the story’s golden-hearted protagonist, Jean Valjean) anywhere he would lead.

Details: Go Hear the People Sing in Les Misérables

Growing Up (Slowly) in Moss Park

Graeme McComb and Haley McGee in Moss Park. Detail of a photo by Michael Cooper.

Graeme McComb and Haley McGee in Moss Park. Detail of a photo by Michael Cooper.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

When we go to the theatre (especially if the plan is to write about the experience), we try to leave everything going on in the world offstage in the lobby. But sometimes, that’s easier said than done. This was the case when we went to see Moss Park just a few hours after the mayor of Toronto had announced that, while he had indeed smoked crack cocaine, he wasn’t going to do anything at all to atone for his misdeeds.

Details: Growing Up (Slowly) in Moss Park

Second City’s New Show Is a Heroic Effort

Allison Price, about to lose her patience with Stacey McGunnigle. Photo courtesy of Second City.

Allison Price, about to lose her patience with Stacey McGunnigle. Photo courtesy of Second City.

  • Second City (51 Mercer Street)
  • 8 p.m.

You might expect a show called We Can Be Heroes to be a send-up of superhero films, but Second City’s new mainstage production is actually a celebration of minor, everyday acts of heroism ranging from giving advice to a bullied child to managing not to be a jackass at your friend’s wedding.

Details: Second City’s New Show Is a Heroic Effort

dirty butterfly

Lauren Brotman in dirty butterfly. Photo by Joe Bucci.

Lauren Brotman in dirty butterfly. Photo by Joe Bucci.

  • Aki Studio Theatre (585 Dundas Street East)
  • 8 p.m.

Jamaican-British playwright Debbie Tucker Green isn’t afraid to touch on heavy subjects, bringing them to light with a blunt but poetic voice. Her play dirty butterfly tells the story of three people—two black and one white—living in a poor London neighbourhood. The thin walls of their tenement houses don’t allow for secrets, and so the harsh realities of domestic violence and racial economic divides are exposed. Presented by Bound to Create Theatre, the play features gut-wrenching performances from Kaleb Alexander, Beryl Bain, and Lauren Brotman.

Details: dirty butterfly