PLCN Fall Book Launch

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street)
  • 7 p.m.

Playwrights Canada Press launches its fall slate of newly published plays with the PLCN Fall Book Launch. The event will feature readings from authors including Keith Barker, Linda Griffiths, and Jordan Tannahill; the evening will be hosted by Jon Kaplan and Susan G. Cole of Now Magazine.

Details: PLCN Fall Book Launch

Growing Up (Slowly) in Moss Park

Graeme McComb and Haley McGee in Moss Park. Detail of a photo by Michael Cooper.

Graeme McComb and Haley McGee in Moss Park. Detail of a photo by Michael Cooper.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

When we go to the theatre (especially if the plan is to write about the experience), we try to leave everything going on in the world offstage in the lobby. But sometimes, that’s easier said than done. This was the case when we went to see Moss Park just a few hours after the mayor of Toronto had announced that, while he had indeed smoked crack cocaine, he wasn’t going to do anything at all to atone for his misdeeds.

Details: Growing Up (Slowly) in Moss Park

Ongoing…

The Royal Ontario Museum Takes a Modern Approach to the Cradle of Civilization

KRocca_THE IMITATION GAME-8346

While the Toronto International Film Festival may have shifted into a more relaxed mode, it’s still offering plenty of opportunities to gawk at movie stars—they’re just a little more spread out. Midweek, fans could catch the premieres of Good Kill (Ethan Hawke as a drone pilot), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg’s new bit of oddness), The Imitation Game (Benedict Cumberbatch as World War II cryptographer Alan Turing), Jauja (Viggo Mortensen, and we don’t know much else really), Laggies (Sam Rockwell and Keira Knightley in a comedy about people taking their sweet time to grow up), October Gale (Patricia Clarkson and Scott Speedman in a thriller/drama set in a remote cabin), Pawn Sacrifice (about the chess duels between Boris Spassky and Bobby Fischer), The Cobbler (Adam Sandler’s latest) and Escobar (Benicio Del Toro is the famous drug kingpin).


Want more TIFF coverage? Torontoist‘s film festival hub is right over here.
Details: TIFF 2014 Scenes: Tuesday–Thursday Nights, Featuring Good Kill, Maps to the Stars, The Imitation Game, Jauja, Laggies, and More

Evil Dead The Musical Returns to Toronto

Ryan Ward and Laura Tremblay in Evil Dead The Musical. Photo by David Hou.

Ryan Ward and Laura Tremblay in Evil Dead The Musical. Photo by David Hou.

  • The Randolph Theatre (736 Bathurst St.)
  • All day

Since its humble beginnings in the back room of Toronto’s Tranzac club back in 2003, Evil Dead The Musical has steadily risen in infamy as a ridiculously fun, tongue-in-cheek, gore-soaked musical experience. From those earliest shows, the musical has gone on to make an off-broadway debut, to win and be nominated for several Dora awards, and to play in dozens of cities around the world, from Montreal and Vancouver to Tokyo and Madrid. It was high time that the show make a triumphant homecoming to a stage in Toronto, and it finally has, at the Randolph Theatre.

Details: Evil Dead The Musical Returns to Toronto

TIFF’s First Major Original Exhibition Traces David Cronenberg’s Evolution

20131029-David Cronenberg - Evolution - TIFF Lightbox-3565- Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)

It’s not every day that a media tour opens with the injunction not to photograph “the sex blob,” but so began TIFF’s preview of “David Cronenberg: Evolution,” the organization’s first large-scale touring exhibition (for now, it’s stationed at the TIFF Bell Lightbox’s HSBC Gallery). It’s an exhaustive, stunning look at some of the wildest, most perverse creations of a pioneer of the body-horror genre—who also happens to be Canada’s most internationally renowned filmmaker.

Details: TIFF’s First Major Original Exhibition Traces David Cronenberg’s Evolution

The Norman Conquests

Soulpepper's artistic director Albert Schultz in rehearsal for The Norman Conquests. Photo by Nathan Kelly.

Soulpepper's artistic director Albert Schultz in rehearsal for The Norman Conquests. Photo by Nathan Kelly.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • All day

Like the company’s recent triumph, Angels in America, Soulpepper’s newest show, The Norman Conquests, requires multiple trips to the theatre—or a hearty constitution for a full day of marathon attendance. Unlike Angels in America, the three instalments of The Norman ConquestsTable Manners, Living Together, and Round and Round the Garden—are comic in nature and small in scope, with each instalment taking place in a different part of a couple’s house. Written by prolific British playwright Alan Ayckbourn, the three-part series features veteran members of the Soulpepper ensemble, and can be “enjoyed individually or in any combination.”

Details: The Norman Conquests

Troubles Found Farther West

Matthew MacFadzean as Thomas Shepherd and Tara Nicodemo as May Buchanan in Farther West. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Matthew MacFadzean as Thomas Shepherd and Tara Nicodemo as May Buchanan in Farther West. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Soulpepper Theatre’s production of Farther West begins with an arresting image—a lithe young woman and a much older, much wider man lie naked next to each other on a bare cot. The woman, we learn, is May Buchanan, who traveled across Canada in the 1870s and 1880s as a prostitute, and then as a brothel owner. She begins to tell her story as she shoves her john off her and gets dressed.

Details: Troubles Found Farther West

The Fun Palace Radio Variety Show

Members of the Fun Palace Players perform at Small Wooden Shoe's first Fun Palace radio variety show. Photo by Erin Brubacher.

Members of the Fun Palace Players perform at Small Wooden Shoe's first Fun Palace radio variety show. Photo by Erin Brubacher.

  • Monarch Tavern (12 Clinton Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Constantly mutating theatre company Small Wooden Shoe has launched a variety show to complement its popular Difficult Plays and Simple Songs reading/sing-along series, and it’s going old-school, making the performance a radio show (which presumably will also be a podcast). The line-up for The Fun Palace Radio Variety Show on November 4 includes the Fun Palace Players and special guests Anand Rajaram, Rob Baker, and Katie Ewald.

Details: The Fun Palace Radio Variety Show

On Stage Theatre Arts Series

Chris Abraham, winner of the 2013 Siminovitch Prize (with protege winner Mitchell Cushman at right), will speak on November 11 at the On Stage Theatre Series. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

Chris Abraham, winner of the 2013 Siminovitch Prize (with protege winner Mitchell Cushman at right), will speak on November 11 at the On Stage Theatre Series. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

  • Toronto Reference Library (789 Yonge Street)
  • 8 p.m.

The Toronto Public Library launches its fifth-annual On Stage Arts Series, giving Torontonians inside glimpses of new upcoming plays with the artistic directors of different companies. On October 28, Factory Theatre co-artistic director Nigel Shawn Williams talks with The Gravitational Pull of Bernice Trimble playwright Beth Graham; on November 4, Studio 180 AD Joel Greenberg talks about Gods of Carnage; on November 11, recent Siminovitch Prize recipient Chris Abraham, AD of Crow’s Theatre, chats with Marcus Youssef and James Long, writers and performers of Winners and Losers; and on November 25, Theatre Passe Muraille’s associate artistic producer Rob Kempson will be on hand to discuss the play he’s written, The Way Back to Thursday.

Details: On Stage Theatre Arts Series

Savage in Limbo Sparks Basement-Bar Epiphanies

The cast of Savage In Limbo. From left to right: Melissa D'Agostino, Diana Bentley, Nick Abraham, Tim Walker, and Caitlin Driscoll. Photo by Matt Campagna.

The cast of Savage In Limbo. From left to right: Melissa D'Agostino, Diana Bentley, Nick Abraham, Tim Walker, and Caitlin Driscoll. Photo by Matt Campagna.

  • The Downstage (798 Danforth Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

In keeping with play’s basement-bar motif, your program for Bob Kills Theatre’s production of Pulitzer-winning playwright John Patrick Shanley’s Savage in Limbo comes in a drink-menu format. The venue, a newly renovated basement hall called The Downstage (previously used by the Playwright Project and other independent companies), has undergone considerable changes, and now boasts blacked-out walls, more lighting, and an actual (albeit small) stage. But most of Savage Limbo, described by Shanley as a “concert play,” is set in the round on broken-down beer-box flooring that’s supposed to suggest a neighbourhood watering hole. There, a motley assortment of dreamers and malcontents are trying to change their lives.

Details: Savage in Limbo Sparks Basement-Bar Epiphanies