La Selva de los Relojes (The Forest of Clocks)

Krisztina Szabó stars in La Selva de los Relojes. Photo courtesy of the Queen of Puddings Music Theatre.

Krisztina Szabó stars in La Selva de los Relojes. Photo courtesy of the Queen of Puddings Music Theatre.

  • Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (145 Queen Street West)
  • 12 p.m.

Queen of Puddings Music Theatre and The Canadian Opera Company present a unique combination of poetry and opera in La Selva de los Relojes (The Forest of Clocks). Arranged for Canadian mezzo-soprano Krisztina Szabó and an ensemble of six instruments, the show is based on Spanish poet Federico García Lorca’s Suites, set to the music of Chris Paul Harman.

Details: La Selva de los Relojes (The Forest of Clocks)

Night of the Living Dead Live, Again and Again

Nug Nahrgang, Andrew Fleming, and Darryl Hinds fight off ghouls while Gwynne Phillips looks on anxiously in Night of the Living Dead Live. Photo by David Goodfellow.

Nug Nahrgang, Andrew Fleming, and Darryl Hinds fight off ghouls while Gwynne Phillips looks on anxiously in Night of the Living Dead Live. Photo by David Goodfellow.

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Fans of the seminal 1968 horror-film classic, Night of the Living Dead, will delight in Night of the Living Dead Live, a new theatrical production of the story. Despite a weak second act, it’s a fun black-and-white romp with some inventive deaths—and even a chipper musical number.

Details: Night of the Living Dead Live, Again and Again

Bitch Salad: Spring Breakouts

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street)
  • 8:30 p.m.

Bitch Salad presents Spring Breakouts, their first show of 2013, with a bunch of acts that have never before appeared on their bill. Hosted by Video on Trial’s Andrew Johnston, the almost entirely female line up boasts sketch duo British Teeth, Write Club host and producer Catherine McCormick, Picnicface’s Evany Rosen, Sunday Night Live‘s Jocelyn Geddie, CBC personality Aisha Alfa, transgendered comedian Avery Edison, and Tim Sims Encouragement Fund Award winner Christi Olson.

Details: Bitch Salad: Spring Breakouts

Ongoing…

I Thought There Were Limits

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

  • Justina M Barnicke Gallery (7 Hart House Circle)
  • All day

When’s the last time you attempted to reconceptualize the dimensions of space? If it’s been a while, you might consider checking out a new exhibition called I Thought There Were Limits, which aims to do just that. This particular exhibit is unique in that the artwork forms a relationship with the site itself (in this case, the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery). The work on display is brought to you by curator Julia Abraham (as part of the MVS degree in Curatorial Studies at the University of Toronto). The artists include Karen Henderson, Yam Lau, Gordon Lebredt, Kika Thorne, and Josh Thorpe.

Details: I Thought There Were Limits

Illustrator Gemma Correll Fills a Toronto Shop With Pug-Themed Merch

A pugerrific pillow print.

A pugerrific pillow print.

  • Magic Pony (680 Queen Street West)
  • All day

For someone well known for her expressive and awwww-inducing drawings of pugs, U.K.-based illustrator Gemma Correll came to her love of the animal late. “I was always a cat person growing up, so I think the pug was like my gateway dog,” she said at Magic Pony, an art and design shop on Queen West that is currently hosting The Mr. Pickles Fan Club, the first Canadian exhibition of her work.

Details: Illustrator Gemma Correll Fills a Toronto Shop With Pug-Themed Merch

Hot Docs Festival

20130423hotdocs13
  • Multiple venues
  • All day

Spring in Toronto is marked by an influx of bikes on the streets, people returning to our parks, and, of course, the Hot Docs festival.

While the weather has so far not fully cooperated with the first two of those activities, rain and cold weather aren’t a hindrance to catching some world-class documentaries. The festival turns 20 this year, but a quarter-life crisis is nowhere in sight. The largest non-fiction film shindig in North America continues to impress, with 205 documentaries screening over 10 days, including 44 world premieres, and films from 43 countries. It’s a lot, but we’re here to help!

Details: Your Guide to Hot Docs 2013

Falsettos

  • Daniels Spectrum (585 Dundas Street East)
  • 7 p.m.

Falsettos, a groundbreaking and Tony Award–winning musical, comes to town for a short run, presented by The Acting Up Stage Company. The story takes us to New York City in 1979, where the Sexual Revolution is hot, AIDS is on the rise, and Marvin, a husband and father, has decided to leave his family for a man. Directed by Robert McQueen and starring Darrin Baker, Sara-Jeanne Hosie, Sarah Gibbons, Michael Levinson, Eric Morin, Stephen Patterson, and Glynis Ranney.

Details: Falsettos

La Ronde Spins Off-Kilter

Maev Beaty and Mike Ross in La Ronde by Arthur Schnitzler, adapted by Jason Sherman. Photo courtesy of Soulpepper.

Maev Beaty and Mike Ross in La Ronde by Arthur Schnitzler, adapted by Jason Sherman. Photo courtesy of Soulpepper.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

In 1897, Austrian playwright Arthur Schnitzler wrote a play so scandalous that at first he only shared it among his friends. It wasn’t publicly staged until 1920 and, unsurprisingly, it caused an uproar. The ruffled feathers had to do with La Ronde‘s frank discussion of sexual relationships—in particular, those between members of different social classes. But while the acts themselves were originally left up to the audience’s imagination, Soulpepper Theatre’s current, modernized adaptation goes all the way with its sex scenes.

Details: La Ronde Spins Off-Kilter

Race Gets Under Your Skin

There's black, white, and a lot of grey area in David Mamet's Race at Canadian Stage. Photo by David Hou.

There's black, white, and a lot of grey area in David Mamet's Race at Canadian Stage. Photo by David Hou.

  • Bluma Appel Theatre (27 Front Street East)
  • 8 p.m.

There are few playwrights whose names can double as adjectives (think “Shakespearean,” or “Beckettian”). But Race, now on at Canadian Stage, makes us want to coin a new one of those words. That’s because of the opening scene, where a black lawyer named Henry Brown addresses a white man with the line “You want to tell me about Black folks?” while leaning back in his office chair at the end of a long boardroom table. It’s distinctly Mamettian.

The American playwright David Mamet is known as much for his portrayal of fast-talking, morally ambiguous businessmen as he is for “Mamet speak,” his unique style of verbose, curse-filled, overlapping dialogue or long-winded speeches. His 2010 script Race is no different—in fact, it might be his most Mamettian to date. It certainly doesn’t beat around the bush when it comes to its subject matter (as the title suggests). Discourse surrounding race, privilege, language, and cultural history consumes the entire play.

Details: Race Gets Under Your Skin