The CN Tower Climb for WWF Canada

  • The CN Tower (301 Front Street West)
  • 6 a.m.

How are those knees doing? The CN Tower Climb invites you to take them for a workout and participate in this annual fundraising event. Yes, there are a lot of stairs but honestly, it’s much easier than it looks. Plus, you can feel good knowing that the money raised is going to the World Wildlife Fund. Start training! The public climb is Saturday; there’s also a team event two days prior, on Thursday, April 25. Check in at Gate 8 at the Rogers Centre.

Details: The CN Tower Climb for WWF Canada

SHE SAID BOOM: Feminist Zine Making Symposium

  • Multiple venues
  • 10 a.m.

Now’s your chance to get in on the DIY culture that’s been booming these past few years. SHE SAID BOOM: Feminist Zine Making Symposium is a multi-day event that culminates with a zine-making workshop (where you’ll learn the ins and outs of creating a zine) to collaboratively create a feminist zine. Following the day of creating and workshops, there’ll be a launch and dance party with performances and readings (and a chance to buy said zine).

Details: SHE SAID BOOM: Feminist Zine Making Symposium

PULP: paper art party

  • Metropolis Factory (50 Edwin Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

PULP, in case you haven’t heard of it, is a paper playground where anyone can do artsy things to the walls. It makes sense then that they are holding a paper art party (with over 20 paper artists) where you can let your creative self run free. Featuring an appearance from the Lemon Bucket Orkestra! Proceeds from the event will go towards Architecture For Humanity Toronto and future projects by PULP: Reclaimed Materials Art and Design.

Details: PULP: paper art party

Ongoing…

I Thought There Were Limits

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

  • Justina M Barnicke Gallery (7 Hart House Circle)
  • All day

When’s the last time you attempted to reconceptualize the dimensions of space? If it’s been a while, you might consider checking out a new exhibition called I Thought There Were Limits, which aims to do just that. This particular exhibit is unique in that the artwork forms a relationship with the site itself (in this case, the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery). The work on display is brought to you by curator Julia Abraham (as part of the MVS degree in Curatorial Studies at the University of Toronto). The artists include Karen Henderson, Yam Lau, Gordon Lebredt, Kika Thorne, and Josh Thorpe.

Details: I Thought There Were Limits

Illustrator Gemma Correll Fills a Toronto Shop With Pug-Themed Merch

A pugerrific pillow print.

A pugerrific pillow print.

  • Magic Pony (680 Queen Street West)
  • All day

For someone well known for her expressive and awwww-inducing drawings of pugs, U.K.-based illustrator Gemma Correll came to her love of the animal late. “I was always a cat person growing up, so I think the pug was like my gateway dog,” she said at Magic Pony, an art and design shop on Queen West that is currently hosting The Mr. Pickles Fan Club, the first Canadian exhibition of her work.

Details: Illustrator Gemma Correll Fills a Toronto Shop With Pug-Themed Merch

Hot Docs Festival

20130423hotdocs13
  • Multiple venues
  • All day

Spring in Toronto is marked by an influx of bikes on the streets, people returning to our parks, and, of course, the Hot Docs festival.

While the weather has so far not fully cooperated with the first two of those activities, rain and cold weather aren’t a hindrance to catching some world-class documentaries. The festival turns 20 this year, but a quarter-life crisis is nowhere in sight. The largest non-fiction film shindig in North America continues to impress, with 205 documentaries screening over 10 days, including 44 world premieres, and films from 43 countries. It’s a lot, but we’re here to help!

Details: Your Guide to Hot Docs 2013

Living Art Comes to the Gladstone Hotel

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

  • Justina M Barnicke Gallery (7 Hart House Circle)
  • All day

When’s the last time you attempted to reconceptualize the dimensions of space? If it’s been a while, you might consider checking out a new exhibition called I Thought There Were Limits, which aims to do just that. This particular exhibit is unique in that the artwork forms a relationship with the site itself (in this case, the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery). The work on display is brought to you by curator Julia Abraham (as part of the MVS degree in Curatorial Studies at the University of Toronto). The artists include Karen Henderson, Yam Lau, Gordon Lebredt, Kika Thorne, and Josh Thorpe.

Details: I Thought There Were Limits

La Ronde Spins Off-Kilter

Maev Beaty and Mike Ross in La Ronde by Arthur Schnitzler, adapted by Jason Sherman. Photo courtesy of Soulpepper.

Maev Beaty and Mike Ross in La Ronde by Arthur Schnitzler, adapted by Jason Sherman. Photo courtesy of Soulpepper.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 1:30 p.m.

In 1897, Austrian playwright Arthur Schnitzler wrote a play so scandalous that at first he only shared it among his friends. It wasn’t publicly staged until 1920 and, unsurprisingly, it caused an uproar. The ruffled feathers had to do with La Ronde‘s frank discussion of sexual relationships—in particular, those between members of different social classes. But while the acts themselves were originally left up to the audience’s imagination, Soulpepper Theatre’s current, modernized adaptation goes all the way with its sex scenes.

Details: La Ronde Spins Off-Kilter

A Brimful of Asha

A Brimful of Asha. Photo courtesy of Tarragon Theatre.

A Brimful of Asha. Photo courtesy of Tarragon Theatre.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m., 2:30 p.m.

Real-life mother and son, Asha and Ravi Jain, share the stage to tell their true, amusing story of cultural and generational clash in A Brimful of Asha. While on a trip to India, Ravi’s parents decide it’s time to introduce him to potential brides, despite his lack of desire to get married.

Details: A Brimful of Asha

The Meme-ing of Life

The Second City cast take a minute to check their Twitters.

The Second City cast take a minute to check their Twitters.

  • Second City (51 Mercer Street)
  • 7:30 p.m.

If there’s one thing that’s particularly impressive about Second City’s new mainstage show, The Meme-ing of Life, it’s how well balanced it is.

As the title implies, Meme-ing is nominally a show about the internet, and certainly there is a fair bit of internet-centric humour. (One sketch, about a boy who falls into a YouTube-induced coma that can only be cured by reading, is particularly on point.) That said, it isn’t just a series of jokes about cat videos. Instead, it’s a well-thought-out show that manages to offer something for pretty much everyone, without stretching itself too thin.

Details: The Meme-ing of Life is an Epic Win

It’s a Full House in True West

It's brotherly love between Lee (Stuart Hughes) and Austin (Mike Ross) in True West. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

It's brotherly love between Lee (Stuart Hughes) and Austin (Mike Ross) in True West. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Sam Shepard’s plays are famously all about man as a caged animal, prowling and brooding around his enclosure (usually a North American domicile), eventually tearing it apart like an untrained puppy suffering from separation anxiety. He is a man’s man’s writer, the lone wolf in the wilderness that so many young males fantasize about—even, it often seems, Shepard himself.

As his most famous work, one of Shepard’s Family Trilogy, True West is a great example: two brothers, Hollywood screenwriter Austin (Mike Ross) and the petty-thieving vagabond Lee (Stuart Hughes), somehow end up house-sitting for their mother while she’s on vacation in Alaska (though only Austin was asked to do so). It’s clear in the script that both men make solo trips outside the walls of their mother’s suburban home, but we never see them apart from each other. That’s because Lee and Austin are two halves of the same man. In fact, it’s common for the two main actors to alternate the roles throughout a run of the show.

Details: It’s a Full House in True West

Hatch

  • Harbourfront Centre (235 Queens Quay West)
  • 8 p.m.

Hatch is back! For those not in the know, Hatch is the Harbourfront Centre’s annual performing arts residency, showcasing works by artists from around the city. This year’s event features exhibitions that explore the moments before and after a photograph, talk politics with LGBTQ folks in their honeymoon suite, and more, all month long. Events take place in the Studio Theatre.

Details: Hatch

Theatresports

  • Comedy Bar (945 Bloor Street West)
  • 8 p.m.

Classic comedy series Theatresports is back for another season of improv hilarity. Now in its 30th year, this comedy tournament continues the tradition of allowing the audience members to choose the content of the scene and letting them judge the results; finals will be held at the end of May. Among the planned guests are comedic greats including Lisa Merchant and Craig Anderson (Canadian Comedy Award winners), Kerry Griffin (Second City alum), and many more.

Details: Theatresports

Falsettos

  • Daniels Spectrum (585 Dundas Street East)
  • 8 p.m.

Falsettos, a groundbreaking and Tony Award–winning musical, comes to town for a short run, presented by The Acting Up Stage Company. The story takes us to New York City in 1979, where the Sexual Revolution is hot, AIDS is on the rise, and Marvin, a husband and father, has decided to leave his family for a man. Directed by Robert McQueen and starring Darrin Baker, Sara-Jeanne Hosie, Sarah Gibbons, Michael Levinson, Eric Morin, Stephen Patterson, and Glynis Ranney.

Details: Falsettos

Carried Away on the Crest of a Wave

Carried Away on the Crest of a Wave. Photo courtesy of Tarragon Theatre.

Carried Away on the Crest of a Wave. Photo courtesy of Tarragon Theatre.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 2:30 p.m., 8 p.m.

David Yee examines life’s interconnectivity in Carried Away on the Crest of a Wave. The play follows an escort in Thailand, a housewife in Utah, and a Catholic priest in India, and how their lives are simultaneously brought together and torn apart by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

Details: Carried Away on the Crest of a Wave

Still Standing You

  • Harbourfront Centre, Enwave Theatre (231 Queens Quay West)
  • 8 p.m.

Belgian-Portuguese dance duo Pieter Ampe and Guilherme Garrido explore the nature of male friendship in the World Stage production of Still Standing You. Pushing themselves to their physical limits, they use their bodies to illustrate notions of touch, tenderness, violence, and struggle. Please note that the show contains full frontal nudity.

Details: Still Standing You

A Few Brittle Leaves

Edward Roy and Gavin Crawford star in A Few Brittle Leaves. Photo courtesy of Buddies in Bad Times Theatre.

Edward Roy and Gavin Crawford star in A Few Brittle Leaves. Photo courtesy of Buddies in Bad Times Theatre.

  • Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (12 Alexander Street)
  • 8 p.m.

Edward Roy and Gavin Crawford star as two 50-something spinster sisters in the gender bending A Few Brittle Leaves. Residing in a suburb of London, Viola and Penelope are faced with the inevitability of aging and the question of whether to abandon their search for love. That is, until the new vicar comes to town and turns their world upside down.

Details: A Few Brittle Leaves

Race Gets Under Your Skin

There's black, white, and a lot of grey area in David Mamet's Race at Canadian Stage. Photo by David Hou.

There's black, white, and a lot of grey area in David Mamet's Race at Canadian Stage. Photo by David Hou.

  • Bluma Appel Theatre (27 Front Street East)
  • 2 p.m., 8 p.m.

There are few playwrights whose names can double as adjectives (think “Shakespearean,” or “Beckettian”). But Race, now on at Canadian Stage, makes us want to coin a new one of those words. That’s because of the opening scene, where a black lawyer named Henry Brown addresses a white man with the line “You want to tell me about Black folks?” while leaning back in his office chair at the end of a long boardroom table. It’s distinctly Mamettian.

The American playwright David Mamet is known as much for his portrayal of fast-talking, morally ambiguous businessmen as he is for “Mamet speak,” his unique style of verbose, curse-filled, overlapping dialogue or long-winded speeches. His 2010 script Race is no different—in fact, it might be his most Mamettian to date. It certainly doesn’t beat around the bush when it comes to its subject matter (as the title suggests). Discourse surrounding race, privilege, language, and cultural history consumes the entire play.

Details: Race Gets Under Your Skin

Live From The Belly of a Whale: A Concert With Stories

Nicolas Di Gaetano and Emily Pearlman. Photo by Matthew Parsons.

Nicolas Di Gaetano and Emily Pearlman. Photo by Matthew Parsons.

  • Videofag (187 Augusta Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

Emily Pearlman and Nicolas Di Gaetano of Mi Casa Theatre, in town for a week to do some filming with the proprietors of Videofag, are capping their visit with a two-night stand of their vaudeville show Live From The Belly of A Whale: A Concert With Stories. It’s the Ottawa-based pair’s first performance back in Toronto since their 2010 SummerWorks show Countries Shaped Like Stars, which ranked among our very favourite things at that fest.

Details: Live From The Belly of a Whale: A Concert With Stories