TIFF Kids International Film Festival Hopes to Inspire Young Film Buffs

The TIFF Kids International Film Festival begins today. Still from The Legend of Sarila courtesy of TIFF.

The TIFF Kids International Film Festival begins today. Still from The Legend of Sarila courtesy of TIFF.

  • TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West)
  • All day

Toronto is a great city for film buffs, and thanks to TIFF Kids International Film Festival, that includes the munchkins, too. The annual festival is about to kick off for the 16th time, and this year boasts a diverse lineup of programming for all ages, the premiere of Canada’s first 3D animated feature film, and a new partnership with Sesame Workshop.

Details: TIFF Kids International Film Festival Hopes to Inspire Young Film Buffs

PROJECTionPLAY

  • Array Space (155 Walnut Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

FAWN, a new music and new opera collective, has brought a new art and music showcase to town. Their Connection Series pairs emerging composers with abstract projection art for unique and inspiring performances. Tonight, catch 23-year-old American pianist Julia Sheriff in PROJECTionPLAY, with art by Dermot MacCormack.

Details: PROJECTionPLAY

Ongoing…

I Thought There Were Limits

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

Kika Thorne's Singularity. Photo by Scott Massey, courtesy of the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver.

  • Justina M Barnicke Gallery (7 Hart House Circle)
  • All day

When’s the last time you attempted to reconceptualize the dimensions of space? If it’s been a while, you might consider checking out a new exhibition called I Thought There Were Limits, which aims to do just that. This particular exhibit is unique in that the artwork forms a relationship with the site itself (in this case, the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery). The work on display is brought to you by curator Julia Abraham (as part of the MVS degree in Curatorial Studies at the University of Toronto). The artists include Karen Henderson, Yam Lau, Gordon Lebredt, Kika Thorne, and Josh Thorpe.

Details: I Thought There Were Limits

Toronto Silent Film Festival

  • Multiple venues
  • All day

It’s been over a year since modern silent film The Artist took home the Oscar for best picture, and with it came a renewed surge of interest in the genre. Which brings us to the Toronto Silent Film Festival, back for its fourth year. The theme of this year’s lineup is the individual versus society, and classic films from around the world have been gathered for the occasion, including The Passion of Joan of Arc and Tokyo Chorus.

Details: Toronto Silent Film Festival

Jaymz Bee’s Birthday Bash Week

Scarlett Jane. Photo by Fred Bukajlo.

Scarlett Jane. Photo by Fred Bukajlo.

  • 7 p.m.

Longtime JAZZ.FM91 host and producer Jaymz Bee is celebrating his 50th Birthday Bash Week with a mix of public and private events around town. It all gets started Monday, April 8 at Hugh’s Room, where he’ll be feted by some of his favourite acts, like Scarlett Jane, Joe Hall, Heather Luckhart, and more. It peaks on Saturday, April 13 at Palais Royale, where Bee has an huge line-up of acts, including Terra Hazelton & Her Problems, The Shuffle Demons, and many more surprise guests. All the info for the week’s events can be found on Bee’s website.

Details: Jaymz Bee’s Birthday Bash Week

Legoland

  • Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Legoland (not to be confused with Legoland) tells the story of the “Gruesome Twosome,” Canada’s youngest drug dealers. Feeling out of place at their boarding school, siblings Penny and Ezra decide to break free and track down Penny’s pop idol, a journey they fund by selling their prescription drugs. This contemporary Vaudeville routine is told through puppetry, ukelele music, and gangster rap.

Details: Legoland

It’s a Full House in True West

It's brotherly love between Lee (Stuart Hughes) and Austin (Mike Ross) in True West. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

It's brotherly love between Lee (Stuart Hughes) and Austin (Mike Ross) in True West. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

  • Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane)
  • 7:30 p.m.

Sam Shepard’s plays are famously all about man as a caged animal, prowling and brooding around his enclosure (usually a North American domicile), eventually tearing it apart like an untrained puppy suffering from separation anxiety. He is a man’s man’s writer, the lone wolf in the wilderness that so many young males fantasize about—even, it often seems, Shepard himself.

As his most famous work, one of Shepard’s Family Trilogy, True West is a great example: two brothers, Hollywood screenwriter Austin (Mike Ross) and the petty-thieving vagabond Lee (Stuart Hughes), somehow end up house-sitting for their mother while she’s on vacation in Alaska (though only Austin was asked to do so). It’s clear in the script that both men make solo trips outside the walls of their mother’s suburban home, but we never see them apart from each other. That’s because Lee and Austin are two halves of the same man. In fact, it’s common for the two main actors to alternate the roles throughout a run of the show.

Details: It’s a Full House in True West

The Whipping Man

  • Toronto Centre for the Arts (5040 Yonge Street)
  • 8 p.m.

The Whipping Man is a 2011 John Gassner New Play Award–winning play that’s set during Passover in 1865. The show tells the tale of a confederate officer who has returned home after the Civil War to find his family missing, but two former slaves remaining. While waiting for the family’s return, the concepts of master and slave, and those of slavery and war, are explored. Directed by Philip Akin and starring Sterling Jarvis, Brett Donahue, and Thomas Olajide.

(Bonus tip: you can save 25 per cent off tickets to the March 16 and April 4 shows by buying them through Toronto-based publisher Bookclub-in-a-Box.)

Details: The Whipping Man

THIS

20130320-Berkeley Street Theatre-257- -Photo_by_Corbin_Smith
  • Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street)
  • 8 p.m.

It’s hardly news nowadays when an actor disrobes onstage, giving an audience a glimpse at what’s underneath a costume. It’s another thing entirely when the theatre itself strips down to its bare bones.

For Canadian Stage’s production of THIS, by Melissa James Gibson, a Canadian playwright gaining popularity in New York City, artistic director (and director of the play) Matthew Jocelyn and set designer Astrid Janson did just that to the historic Berkeley Street Theatre in Corktown.

Details: THIS Reveals a Theatre’s Bones