Laura Barrett

  • Campbell House Museum (160 Queen Street West)
  • 7 p.m.

If you’re looking for a comedown following the epicness that is CMW, you might consider checking out this set from Laura Barrett. She’ll be performing as part of the Campbell House Museum’s The Listening Party music series. Click here to listen to some of her music.

Details: Laura Barrett

Sexpectations: A Collective Procreation

  • Hart House Theatre (7 Hart House Circle)
  • 8 p.m.

As you might have guessed, Sexpectations: A Collective Procreation is a cabaret about sex. This one-night-only event from the Hart House Players showcases a collective creation that includes film, photography, singing, dancing, comedy, and more. Be sure to email harthouseplayers@gmail.com to reserve your seats. The event will likely fill up fast.

Details: Sexpectations: A Collective Procreation

Ongoing…

ChildSight

  • Papermill Gallery (67 Pottery Road)
  • All day

What might we see through the eyes of a child? ChildSight tries to answer that question by pairing selected artwork with audio commentary from children who participate in the Kaleidoscope in-school art program. The opening reception on Thursday, March 21st also includes awards presentations, drinks, and, of course, a chance to check out the show itself.

Details: ChildSight

Sound Image Music Photography Exhibition

  • Analogue Gallery (673 Queen Street West)
  • 12 p.m.

Tonight (March 19), the second-annual Sound Image Music Photography Contest and Exhibition kicks off with a party. Judges Stephen Carlick (Exclaim! photo editor), Lucia Graca (creative director of Analogue Gallery), music photographer Barrie Wentzell, and Broken Social Scene’s Brendan Canning will start the evening by announcing the contest’s winner. The two-week-long exhibition features work from Courtney Lee Yip, Brian Patterson, Jess Baumung, Kevin Calixte, Roger Cullman, Vanessa Heins, and more.

Details: Sound Image Music Photography Exhibition

Ching Chong Chinaman

  • Daniels Spectrum (585 Dundas Street East)
  • 2 p.m.

fu-GEN Theatre Company presents the Canadian premiere of Lauren Yee’s cheeky and insightful play, Ching Chong Chinaman. The ultra-assimilated Wong family don’t quite fit the Asian-American stereotype: teenaged Upton ignores chores and homework to play video games, and his sister Desi’s math scores are less than stellar. Upton’s solution to both problems? Hire an Asian indentured servant with an American dream. Starring Zoe Doyle, Brenda Kamino, Oliver Koomsatira, Richard Lee, Jane Luk, and John Ng.

Details: Ching Chong Chinaman

Iceland is Well Worth the Return Trip

Claire Calnan, Lauren Vandenbrook, and Kawa Ada. Photo by Joanna Akyol.

Claire Calnan, Lauren Vandenbrook, and Kawa Ada. Photo by Joanna Akyol.

  • Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street)
  • 2 p.m.

For Torontonians suffering from a case of cabin fever, we highly recommend traveling to Iceland this month. It might not be the most comforting trip, but it’s well worth the fare.

Contrary to its title, Nicolas Billon’s play—the second in his Fault Lines trilogy (which also consists of Greenland and The Faroe Islands)—doesn’t take place in its namesake scenic island nation. Rather, it zooms in on a single condo in Toronto’s Liberty Village, and the three people whose lives intersect in one traumatic incident there. As each character reveals his or her part to play, we learn that the trio is drawn together by far more than just coincidence. Their lives are interconnected by the almighty dollar.

Details: Iceland is Well Worth the Return Trip

The Whipping Man

  • Toronto Centre for the Arts (5040 Yonge Street)
  • 2 p.m., 7 p.m.

The Whipping Man is a 2011 John Gassner New Play Award–winning play that’s set during Passover in 1865. The show tells the tale of a confederate officer who has returned home after the Civil War to find his family missing, but two former slaves remaining. While waiting for the family’s return, the concepts of master and slave, and those of slavery and war, are explored. Directed by Philip Akin and starring Sterling Jarvis, Brett Donahue, and Thomas Olajide.

(Bonus tip: you can save 25 per cent off tickets to the March 16 and April 4 shows by buying them through Toronto-based publisher Bookclub-in-a-Box.)

Details: The Whipping Man

The Meme-ing of Life

The Second City cast take a minute to check their Twitters.

The Second City cast take a minute to check their Twitters.

  • Second City (51 Mercer Street)
  • 7:30 p.m.

If there’s one thing that’s particularly impressive about Second City’s new mainstage show, The Meme-ing of Life, it’s how well balanced it is.

As the title implies, Meme-ing is nominally a show about the internet, and certainly there is a fair bit of internet-centric humour. (One sketch, about a boy who falls into a YouTube-induced coma that can only be cured by reading, is particularly on point.) That said, it isn’t just a series of jokes about cat videos. Instead, it’s a well-thought-out show that manages to offer something for pretty much everyone, without stretching itself too thin.

Details: The Meme-ing of Life is an Epic Win

To the Last Cry and The Lost Sagas of Tjorvi the Flaccid

  • Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street)
  • 8 p.m., 2 p.m.

Theatre Lab and Pandemic Theatre have joined forces to present a limited engagement double feature. The Theatre Lab’s To the Last Cry uses puppetry and masks to tell the story of a nameless peasant boy who braves a dangerous magical forest to save his dying brother. The Lost Sagas of Tjorvi the Flaccid, presented by Pandemic Theatre, takes us to a Viking world where Tjorvi struggles to prove himself worthier than his emasculating title.

Details: To the Last Cry and The Lost Sagas of Tjorvi the Flaccid

In This World and Other People’s Children

Niki Landau, Elisa Moolecherry, and Gray Powell in Other People's Children. Photo by Nir Bareket.

Niki Landau, Elisa Moolecherry, and Gray Powell in Other People's Children. Photo by Nir Bareket.

  • Tarragon Theatre (30 Bridgman Avenue)
  • 8 p.m.

One of Canada’s most acclaimed and prolific young playwrights, Hannah Moscovitch, has her own mini festival at Tarragon Theatre this season. It started with This is War in January, and continues into March with three one act plays, all concerning children. Two of those three pieces make up the double bill now playing: In This World and Other People’s Children. (We’ve got a review of the latter play here.)

Details: In This World and Other People’s Children