Torontoist

Torontoist

culture

The House that Riesling Built

In the world of winemaking, Ontario is entering its adolescence.

Ontario wine

Many Ontario wineries are a short drive outside the city. Photo courtesy of Flickr user Karen Maraj from the Torontoist Flickr pool.

Cave Spring Cellars made their first vintage in 1986. It was a small 500-case batch of wine. This date is a reminder of how early we are in the history of wine in this province. It was one of the first eight wineries in the province and second on the Beamsville Bench.

I recently had a chance to speak with Len Pennachetti, the president and founder of Cave Spring Cellars (and brother of Toronto’s former city manager). He got his start in the wine industry when he was tasked with working vineyards that were purchased by his father.

Keep reading: The House that Riesling Built

cityscape

Cars Take Up Too Much Space on King Street

Three possible options to improve King Street presented at recent meeting.

People packed into Metro Hall on February 13 to hear about the future of King Street.

People packed into Metro Hall on February 13 to hear about the future of King Street.

Hundreds packed into the third floor of Metro Hall February 13 to learn about the City of Toronto’s plans for redesigning King Street. The city is looking to implement a pilot project on the busy east-west downtown corridor, which could be implemented as early as the fall of 2017.

It was clear that city staff did not anticipate such a high turnout. Four hundred people were stuffed into two rooms, and an overflow room with a capacity of 200 filled up quickly as well. Latecomers were turned away at the door, told to visit the project website and comment there.

Keep reading: Cars Take Up Too Much Space on King Street

culture

Historicist: “We Are Confident That Victory Is in Sight”

This post was originally published on July 6, 2013.

Front page, the Toronto Sun, June 19, 1990

Front page of the Toronto Sun June 19, 1990.

At first glance, the space above Asteria Souvlaki Place at 292A Danforth Ave. drew little attention to itself. Until February 11, 1990, its occupants were happy to keep it that way. Not advertising to the world that this was the local office of the African National Congress (ANC) was intended to protect staff from potential harm. When word arrived that day from South Africa that Nelson Mandela was free after over 27 years of imprisonment, 292A Danforth went public by offering itself as a place for Torontonians to celebrate the news.

Keep reading: Historicist: “We Are Confident That Victory Is in Sight”