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In Photos: AIDS Vigil Shines a Light on Indigenous Health

What does reconciliation and decolonization mean for people living with HIV and AIDS?

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As part of a larger, Pride-wide focus on Indigenous issues this year—the parade’s grand marshal is Cree artist Kent Monkman and the youth ambassador is Kiley May, a Hotinonshón:ni Mohawk and Cayuga storyteller—Tuesday’s AIDS Vigil featured discussion about reconciliation and the unequal health-care access Indigenous people in Canada are still dealing with.

Pouring rain threatened to put an end to the performances, and meant the event’s hosts drew a laugh when they asked attendees to put their candles in the designated sandboxes or risk a fire hazard. But no lightning accompanied the downfall, and the ceremony went on without disruption.

With poncho-clad volunteers walking through the crowd smudging, co-host Ana Demetrakopoulos explained what reconciliation can mean in the context of people living with HIV and AIDS.

Keep reading: In Photos: AIDS Vigil Shines a Light on Indigenous Health

culture

Mirthful Mx. In The 6ix: 2017 Edition

Our annual comedy profile, previously named Local Ladies Who Make Us Laugh, is evolving—much like these comedic talents.

The 2017 Mirthful Mx. In The 6ix, from left to right: Nicola Dempsey, Rosie Dempsey, Isabel Kanaan, Tess Degenstein, Nadine Djoury, and in front, Chantel Marostica.

The 2017 Mirthful Mx. In The 6ix, from left to right: Nicola Dempsey, Rosie Dempsey, Isabel Kanaan, Tess Degenstein, Nadine Djoury, and, in front, Chantel Marostica.


This is Torontoist‘s seventh-annual feature showcasing some of the city’s best established and emerging comedic talent, and up until now, they’ve all been female-identifying. The intent has always been to shine a light on performers and creators who don’t resemble the same five white guys (or four white guys and one POC) on a stand-up bill, or the half dozen guys on a typical improv or sketch troupe, or the all-male (save for maybe one or two women) writers’ room for most TV and film properties.

But in striving to correct that imbalance, by promoting more gender-balanced comedy bills, we’ve had to contend with our own bias, and have increasingly come to view the title “Local Ladies Who Make Us Laugh” as problematic. (Singer-songwriter Neko Case wrote a long and influential online essay on the issues with “Women in _____” features that we can’t stop thinking about.) And what sense does it make to stick with the same format when one of the performers we’d already selected to feature admits it makes them feel ill to be referred to as a lady?

Keep reading: Mirthful Mx. In The 6ix: 2017 Edition

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Torontoist Explains: Green Bonds, Making a Profit While Making a Difference

Green bonds are helping to fund the transition to a renewable energy-based economy.

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Photo via the CoPower LinkedIn.

In the wake of U.S. President Donald Trump pulling out of the Paris climate accord, you might be looking for ways to protect the planet that don’t rely solely on governments and international treaties.

The divestment movement now boasts more than $5 trillion in money diverted from the fossil fuel industry, but that can’t be the end of the story. Equally important to withdrawing support from oil, gas, and coal is reinvesting that money in projects that build climate resilience and clean energy.

That’s where green bonds come in.

Keep reading: Torontoist Explains: Green Bonds, Making a Profit While Making a Difference