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Historicist: The Caravan is on its Way

Torontonians travel the world—without leaving the city borders.

Volunteers at the first Metro International Caravan.  Toronto Star, June 30, 1969.

Volunteers at the first Metro International Caravan. Toronto Star, June 30, 1969.

“Toronto was once a mausoleum where nothing moved on Sunday but clergymen’s lips,” wrote the Toronto Star‘s Trent Frayne in 1974. However, in the years since the Second World War, Frayne observed, immigrants from many different countries had relocated to Toronto and “all of a sudden, the town’s drab monotone was overlaid by a merge of colour and tone and style and language that produced a whole new ambience.” Frayne’s article was published on the weekend before Canada Day, and was prompted by the opening of the annual Metro International Caravan, Toronto’s popular, week-long festival which showcased the food, music, and other cultural traditions of Toronto’s immigrant population.

Keep reading: Historicist: The Caravan is on its Way

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Video and Photos: Trans Marchers Celebrate the Passing of Trans Human Rights Bill

“I'm marching today because I finally have the freedom to be the person I always wanted to be"

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The mood was jubilant as thousands took part in the 9th annual Toronto Trans March on Friday evening. Marchers took off from Bloor Street at Church, headed south down Yonge Street, turned left on Carlton Street, ending up in Allan Gardens.

Keep reading: Video and Photos: Trans Marchers Celebrate the Passing of Trans Human Rights Bill

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Flooding Across the GTA Will Only Get Worse With Climate Change

Severe flooding on Ward's Island has led to a plunge in business at the Rectory Café. It will close for good in October.

After one of the rainiest springs on record, Toronto is grappling with prolonged flooding. Here’s what the TRCA is doing to keep the damage at bay.

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Photo by Sean Tamblyn via Toronto Island Park.

The Rectory Café on Toronto’s Ward Island overlooks a large, marshy pond—a new addition this year to the tourist site. The wetland is the result of a particularly rainy spring that saw double the rainfall compared to the same period last year, and by May 31 water levels in Lake Ontario reached the highest they’ve been on record. About 40 per cent of Ward’s Island has receded into the encroaching lake. During the calm after one of the season’s many rainfalls, the flooded island, with its Toronto skyline backdrop, makes for an eerily beautiful image. But the impact on the environment, and the people who rely on it, can be devastating. Keep reading: Flooding Across the GTA Will Only Get Worse With Climate Change