See Diverse Faces Return to Toronto Stages

Torontoist

culture

See Diverse Faces Return to Toronto Stages

A solo opera about 20th century women, a survivor's story, and a serio-comedic saga of young Asian Canadian men all have return engagements.

Pamela Sinha in the 2012 production of Crash. Photo by Aviva Armour-Ostroff.

Pamela Sinha in the 2012 production of Crash. Photo by Aviva Armour-Ostroff.

It’s been a busy few weeks on Toronto stages, with plenty of new plays opening—and returning shows you may have missed the first time around. As we did last month with our round-up of remounts, we’ve revisited old coverage and selected a few shows (there are more opening in the weeks to come in May) worth seeing this weekend; also perhaps worth noting, as we belatedly did in our final proofread: All three shows star racialized performers.


Crash: Pamela Sinha’s one woman play wraps up this weekend, after just five short performances. A harrowing tale of the fallout after her sexual assault, it was a 2012 Dora winner for Best New Play; of its 2013 remount, our review said, “a phenomenal performance, not least because of its autobiographical nature.” (Crash will be followed next week by the next show in Soulpepper’s Solo Series, Haley McGee‘s I’m Doing This For You.) To April 29, The Young Centre (55 Mill Street),
Wednesday–Saturday, 8 p.m., Saturday, 2 p.m., $25–$59.



Century Song: First produced in Toronto as part of the 2016 Progress Festival, Neema Bickersteth’s solo show, directed by Volcano Theatre’s Ross Manson and choreographed by Kate Alton, has the soprano sing her way through dozens of stories of women who lived in the 20th century. She’s backed up by musical collaborators Gregory Oh and Debashis Sinha (yes, Pamela’s brother), and the show is also underscored by video projections by German company fettFilm, helping Bickersteth take the audience through 100 years of history. Now Magazine‘s Glenn Sumi said last year that “Century Song is an unforgettable multimedia journey, and a must-see”; the show will be touring Canada for much of the next year after this run wraps up this weekend. To April 29, Streetcar Crowsnest (245 Carlaw Avenue), Tuesday–Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Saturday, 2 p.m., $20–$35.


The 2015 Factory Theatre cast of Banana Boys. Photo by Joseph Michael.

The 2015 Factory Theatre cast of Banana Boys. Photo by Joseph Michael.


Banana Boys: We interviewed playwright Terry Woo back in 2005, when his play about young Asian men finding their way in Western culture first debuted in Toronto, directed by Nina Lee Aquino. Aquino has since remounted the show several times, most recently at Factory Theatre, where she’s now artistic director; the show was a major hit for the then-struggling company, bringing in big numbers of non-subscribers to Factory. It’s back again, through much of May, with new “Boys” Jonathan Kim and Miquelon Rodriguez joining the cast. To May 14, Factory Theatre (125 Bathurst Street), Tuesday–Saturday, 8 p.m., Sunday, 2 p.m., $25-$55.


Urban Planner is your curated guide to what’s on in Toronto—things that
are local, affordable, and exceptional.

Comments