Installations Worth Checking Out at the Beach (Even in Winter)

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Installations Worth Checking Out at the Beach (Even in Winter)

A temporary waterfront exhibition gives life to unused lifeguard stations.

Thanks to the Winter Stations design exhibition on the eastern beaches, Torontonians have at least five good reasons to get outside this winter.

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HotBox rendering, courtesy of Winter Stations.


The late-season festival has seen the transformation of five seasonally unused lifeguard stations into temporary interactive pieces of art. Despite face-slapping opening-day temperatures around minus-let’s-not-talk-about-it, dozens flocked to check out the shelter-sized installations.

Snow Cone design rendering, courtesy of Winter Stations

Snow Cone design rendering, courtesy of Winter Stations.

The brainchild of architectural firm Raw Design, the festival features designs by an international cohort of contest winners: HotBox by Torontonians Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod; The Wing Back by American Timothy Olson; Snow Cone by Ryerson students Lily Jeon and Diana Koncan; Driftwood Throne by U.K. designer Daniel Madeiros; and Swing Swing by Ed Butler, Dan Wiltshire, and Frances McGeown, also of the U.K.

Winter Stations, which occupies lifeguard stations between Woodbine and Victoria Park, runs until March 20.

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