Today Tue Wed
It is forecast to be Rain at 10:00 PM EST on November 24, 2014
Rain
12°/0°
It is forecast to be Chance of Snow at 10:00 PM EST on November 25, 2014
Chance of Snow
4°/-2°
It is forecast to be Overcast at 10:00 PM EST on November 26, 2014
Overcast
2°/-1°

events

Urban Planner: July 19, 2013

In today's Urban Planner: see Oh My Irma before it crosses the pond, Soulpepper puts on a seven-hour play, and a dance party on a tall ship.

Oh My Irma  Photo by Jesse Griffiths

Oh My Irma. Photo by Jesse Griffiths.

  • Theatre: Local performer and playwright Haley McGee is bringing her award-winning, one-woman show to the world famous Edinburgh Fringe Festival in August, and she’s doing three warm-up performances in Toronto before crossing the ocean. Oh My Irma has already won awards in New York, Hamburg, and Mongolia; if you haven’t seen the show yet, now’s the time. Theatre Passe Muraille Mainspace (16 Ryerson Avenue), 7:30 p.m., $15.00–$20.00. Details
  • Theatre: Perhaps Soulpepper’s most ambitious theatrical project yet, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America is a seven-hour epic set against the backdrop of the AIDS crisis of the 80′s and 90′s. The play earned a Pulitzer Prize and Tony awards (for the stage versions), and Golden Globes and Emmys (for the HBO miniseries.) Broken down into Parts I and II (sub-titled Millennium Approaches and Perestroika), the company is presenting the two plays in repertory on a nightly basis (save for Sunday evenings) and strongly urges viewers to see them in order. (Full day “marathons” begin in August.) There’s a video with director Albert Schultz and the cast’s thoughts on the project during rehearsal; previews being on July 19, with Millennium Approaches opening on July 31 and Perestroika) on August 1. Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane), 7:30 p.m., $5-$68. Details
  • Parties: Two of Torontoist‘s favourite performers, musician Maylee Todd and comedian Inessa Frantowski, are collaborating on a late-night, out-on-the-water dance party with special guests Laura Barrett, Laura Cilevitz, Pooyan, and more. The Tall Ship Kajama will disembark from its jetty by Harbourfront Centre at 30 minutes to midnight, and Goats on Boats will commence its at-sea bacchanalian festivities from midnight until shortly before the sun rises. Queen’s Quay Terminal (207 Queen’s Quay West), 11:30 p.m., $20. Details

Ongoing…

  • History: The name “Mesopotamia” derives from a Greek term meaning “land between the rivers.” The Royal Ontario Museum’s latest major exhibit, which opens on June 22, takes this literally, as visitors flow between painted representations of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers on the floor.

    Presented by the British Museum and rounded out with pieces from institutions in Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia, “Mesopotamia: Inventing Our World” covers 3,000 years of human development in the cradle of urban civilization. Most of the 170 artifacts on display have never been shown in Canada. Royal Ontario Museum (100 Queens Park), 12 a.m., $27 (Includes general admission). Details

  • Theatre: If Fringe and SummerWorks aren’t enough to satisfy your summer theatre cravings, the world-renowned Stratford Festival is now only a bus ride away from downtown Toronto, thanks to the new Stratford Direct bus route (“the best thing [the Festival] has done in years” according to one usher at the Avon Theatre). Artistic Director Antoni Cimolino has put together a season to please tastes from the traditional to the extravagant. Here’s what we think about five of Stratford’s current productions. Multiple venues, 12 a.m., $25–$175. Details
  • Art: Flight: A Thrilling History of an Idea is a new exhibition from the Toronto Reference Library that gathers a number of rare items that explore the theme of the possible and the impossible. Some of the highlights on display are La vingtième siècle: la vie électrique (a rare French book that shows how scientific discoveries would have affected people in 1955), Tame (a sci-fi pulp magazine), and Worldly Wisdom (watercolour that depicts a Leonardo da Vinci-like figure creating a winged flying machine). You’ll find the exhibition in the library’s TD Gallery. Toronto Reference Library (789 Yonge Street), 12 a.m., FREE. Details
  • Theatre: Soulpepper Theatre collaborates on a Joe Orton play, Entertaining Mr. Sloane, with Buddies in Bad Times Theatre’s artistic producer Brendan Healey. Guest director Healey has coached some Soulpepper theatre stalwarts—Stuart Hughes, Fiona Reid, Michael Simpson, and David Beazley—for this dark comedy about a charming lodger who incites illicit passions among his other housemates. Young Centre for the Performing Arts (50 Tank House Lane), 8 p.m. and 8 p.m., $5-$68. Details
  • Festivals: Tirgan, the world’s largest Iranian festival, is making its summer return to the Harbourfront Centre to bring you a weekend of arts and culture showcasing Iranian diversity. Some of the highlights include a performance by Vancouver Pars National Ballet, short films by Shirin Neshat (with a Q&A), learning to cook Iranian cuisine with Najmieh Batmanglij, and a variety of art projects happening all weekend long. Click here for the full itinerary. Harbourfront Centre (235 Queen’s Quay West), 12 a.m., FREE. Details
  • Festivals: This year’s edition of UNITY Festival is a little flashier than those in years past.

    The annual festival is put on by UNITY Charity, which works in communities across the country to help at-risk young people channel their anger and frustration into the arts. The festival is a four-day celebration of the organization’s work. This year, UNITY participants will get to both open for and perform in front of some of their heroes, including MC Talib Kweli, who will be playing a free show at Yonge-Dundas Square on Saturday night, and beatboxing legends Rahzel and Scratch. Multiple venues, 12 a.m., FREE–$10. Details

  • Art: CUE, a non-profit arts organization that encourages artistic expression from the city’s fringes, hosts “Margin of Eras.” The exhibit gathers over 20 different artists’ work for display in a pop-up gallery on Wednesdays to Sundays for two weeks in July. For the launch party on Friday, July 12 at 7 p.m., there’ll be a live New Orleans jazz band, and more. Abandoned convenience store (Queen St. W. and Gladstone Ave.), 12 p.m., FREE. Details
  • Music: Travel back to turn-of-the-century Paris—La Belle Époque—with the Toronto Summer Music Festival. Established and up-and-coming classical musicians gather for this three-week festival to celebrate works by French composers such as Ravel, Debussy, and Fauré. Lectures, workshops, interviews, and concerts will take place in various venues across the city. Multiple venues, 12 p.m., Various prices. Details
  • Theatre: The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged is back again for a three-day stretch of hilarious insanity. For the uninitiated, this performance does exactly what’s promised in its name. It performs all of Shakespeare’s 37 plays in just 87 minutes. It sold out all last summer so consider picking up your tickets while you can. Casa Loma (1 Austin Terrace), 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., $49. Details
  • Performing Arts: Cats is a challenging musical to stage for a number of reasons. The narrative is thin and strange; the lyrics are drawn primarily from T.S. Eliot’s poetry collection Old Possum’s Book Of Practical Cats, with more borrowed from some other Eliot poems, “Rhapsody on a Windy Night” (which original director Trevor Nunn adapted into the song “Memory”) and “Moments of Happiness.” The result is not so much a story as ideas and character sketches. Old Deuteronomy, patriarch of the Jellicle Cats, calls the creatures together once a year to celebrate, and for one cat to be chosen to ascend to the Heaviside Layer (essentially, to die and be reincarnated). Most of the songs detail the adventures and virtues of a single cat in particular, essentially serving as that cat’s audition for the honour of ascension. Panasonic Theatre (651 Yonge Street), 7:30 p.m., $60–$110. Details
  • Music: Cover band extraordinaire Dwayne Gretzky kicks off Indie Fridays, Yonge-Dundas Square’s weekly summer music night series, on June 28. The eight-piece rock ‘n’ roll cover band most recently played Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours album from beginning to end. Later in the summer, Indie Fridays’ feature acts include soul singer Saidah Baba Talibah (August 2), Polaris Prize shortlisters Plants and Animals (August 23), and hip hop innovator Cadence Weapon (August 30). Yonge-Dundas Square (1 Dundas Street East), 8 p.m., FREE. Details

Happening soon:

Urban Planner is Torontoist‘s guide to what’s on in Toronto, published every weekday morning, and in a weekend edition Friday afternoons. If you have an event you’d like considered, email us with all the details (including images, if you’ve got any), ideally at least a week in advance.

Comments