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news

Newsstand: June 13, 2013

Unfortunately, "It's Thursday" isn't yet a universally accepted excuse for not being able to come in to work. But that doesn't mean it's not worth a try. In the news: police take to north Etobicoke in a huge raid, public consultations begin on the future of the Gardiner Expressway, city council nixes making the U of T field a heritage site, and Women's College Hospital gets a new clinic.

newsstand jeremy kai spring 3

Bad news for people hoping the controversy at City Hall would die down: police conducted a large-scale raid earlier this morning in north Etobicoke and, according to the Star pretty much every media outlet, the alleged Rob Ford crack cocaine video is tied in to it. We’ll have more on this as it develops, including confirmation on whether McNulty sat this raid out too, or finally joined in.

Bad news for crumbling concrete infrastructure: the City is looking at ways to fix the Gardiner Expressway. There will be a public meeting on the subject this evening, and while you’re there, you can check out six visions for the highway’s future on display as part of a City and Waterfront Toronto-sponsored design competition. And make sure you take a good look, because given the crop of politicians at City Hall these days, you’re not likely to see them again any time soon.

Bad news for dandelions: city council voted yesterday against designating the field on the University of Toronto’s back campus a heritage site. That pretty much guarantees the field will be AstroTurf’d so it can be used for field hockey matches during the Pan Am Games. But if you’re one of those grass-loving folks dismayed by the decision, all is not lost. Council is asking the university to conduct an environmental assessment of the conversion in 10 years, and to report on any “significant detrimental impacts.” Just wait…the words “I told you so” will never have tasted so sweet.

Meanwhile, bad news for big pharma: the University of Toronto seems to be on to their schemes, albeit a little late. A former med student who now practices at St. Michael’s Hospital has blown the whistle on a lecture series supported by pharmaceutical companies that flog opioids, which was part of the school’s curriculum. The university has since changed the curriculum, but hasn’t addressed why it was like that in the first place.

Bad news for infectious bacteria: Women’s College Hospital just opened its new outpatient clinic, which uses technology and sensible thinking to support more patients recovering from surgeries at home, instead of in-hospital where they run the risk of contracting diseases and eating really mediocre food. It’s the hospital of the future, today, and as you can imagine, women are behind it.

Comments

  • Brock

    It appears that the Star will do near anything to link Ford to a drug story. They are now officially a grade A Tabloid.

    • Cousin Linc

      Big pharma sponsors a lecture series at the University of Toronto, and Ford is the mayor of Toronto, so now he’s linked to the evils of big drug companies too.

      • dsmithhfx

        Nah, he’s just linked to shabby local drug dealers. I doubt big pharma would touch him with a ten foot pole.

    • Steveinto

      I gather you had trouble following the bouncing ball during sing-a-long

      • Brock

        You are clearly one that judges a book by its cover. It must really be lonely being so shallow.

        • Steveinto

          Considering the up and down grade I am not the lonely one.

          • Brock

            One strong voice speaks for the silent. Several weak voices speak for the defeated.

    • dsmithhfx

      Mayor-Rob-Ford-photographed-with-dead-drug-dealer-at-house-raided-by-drug-squad.

  • HotDang

    The blue-sky visions commissioned by the city and Waterfront Toronto as part of a $7-million study into tearing down parts of the aging highway
    include everything from four-lane tunnels to raised “parkways” to
    demolishing the section east of Jarvis Street and persuading commuters
    to leave their cars at home and take a new downtown relief subway line.

    Unless the DRL goes to Mississauga I think there may be a problem with this plan. Hopefully the plans to massively increase Go Train service remove a lot of the traffic from the Gardiner. I’m not going to hold my breath though; motorists generally drive to work because they fear sitting near people.

    • Brock

      Motorists generally drive to work because they cannot work within the guidelines of the transit system. Some of us work 12-15 hours daily and mass transit just does not fit.

      • tomwest

        GO Trains run 5am to midnight. If you are driving outside those hours, then I don’t think rush hour traffic is your problem.

        • Brock

          So when you live more than a half hour away from your office and you traditionally start at 0530am and live more than 45 minutes away, the GO Train just is not feasible.

          • dsmithhfx

            No GO service to Mars? Poor you!

      • dsmithhfx

        You work 12-15 hours daily posting pro-Ford garbage? Good for you! Do you get paid?

    • tomwest

      A “massive increase” isn’t needed…. Three extra GO Trains/hour could transport more people than the Gardiner does during rush hour.

      • vampchick21

        The real trick is convincing people to park their cars and take the GO Train.

        • b

          You do not seem to grasp the real world. The GO Train is for a select few within a certain commute distance. For many of us it is not justifiable.

          • vampchick21

            Whatever BROCK. F-off.

          • Brock

            I don not understand your inner hostility, it seems if one person as a varying position to yours, you turn obtuse and vulgar relatively quick.

          • vampchick21

            Stop trying to pretend your some innocent little victim troll. No one is buying it. Least of all me.

          • Brock

            I honestly do not understand your anger. If you have noticed, this person has kept profanity out of any of his responses and have attempted to maintain a civil conversation with everyone including yourself. You anger just puzzles me.

          • the_lemur

            Pulling ad hominems out of thin air and using them against strangers on a ‘Don’t ask me how I know, it’s just obvious’ basis is not a civil conversation.

          • dsmithhfx

            Looks like he took your advice…

          • vampchick21

            Until he figures out how to sneak back in for a few days.

        • OgtheDim

          Its not that hard actually, as long as the trains run on time. The CBA for many people makes GO worth doing.

          • vampchick21

            I think there would still be a section of people who would be hard to convince, judging by the number of cars on the roads during rush hour with just one person in them. They’ve gotten into the habit of driving.

          • dsmithhfx

            Some idiot on the radio this morning was arguing that transit spending is a waste, it should all be spent on highways instead. Time-traveler from 1950, I guess.

          • vampchick21

            That’s….wow….that’s pretty out of touch. I mean, yes, road improvements are needed (i.e. The Gardiner and what the hell to do with it, the DVP, roads and highways in the north of the province where transit is less of an option), but down here in the high density area that is the GTHA? No, expanded and improved transit is a must.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            Doesn’t this assume the person lives and works near a GO station? Tacking on local transit before and after their GO commute could be what makes it infeasible for a lot of people.

            There’s also a large chunk of the Golden Horseshoe south of the lake denied GO train service except select weekends of the summer. A two-hour multi-vehicle commute from St Catharines, or a one-hour drive…

          • vampchick21

            I think that multiple fares thing is something that should be looked at for sure. I know that you can buy a weekly pass that covers York transit and TTC, but it’s a higher cost than the regular TTC weekly pass. Durham has a system where you pay a stupidly small amount to get on their transit at the GO Stations if you show your ticket/use your Presto card, and they’re trying to impliment it here. But there does need to be something in place that makes the transit fares between systems more platiable to people. The various regional transits need to sit at the table together.

          • Brock

            Those cards to link transit systems add an additional level of accounting thus driving up the prices on the transit system. It may work on the surface to the layman, but at what cost to the rest of that cannot utilize the service.

          • the_lemur

            Nonsense. That ‘additional level of accounting’ is automated and enables Presto to handle different levels of use.

          • Brock

            You obviously do not know how crown corporations are run. Yes they are inefficient. Maybe if the provincial transit system was privatized service and value would be increased.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            Multiple fares is a problem, but every additional system transfer introduces the risk of delays or cancellation, missed connections, overcapacity vehicles, etc.

            In the St Catharines example above, you have to take the Niagara Falls bus to Burlington to get the train. The combination of highway traffic, stopping along the way, and waiting for the connecting train doubles the time it would take just by train alone. And I’ve been left at the bus stop in St Cats because the bus was already full, adding another hour’s wait for the next bus, ultimately taking me 4 hours to get door to door. By car takes a little over an hour.

          • vampchick21

            Ok, I think we need to clarfiy here though. I’m talking about regular commutes to and from work. The majority of people doing this would live in Mississauga, Durham, Markham, Brampton. Of course, this does not mean that someone doesn’t live in, say, St Cats and work in downtown Toronto, but clearly that’s something different from someone living in Mississauga with quick and easy access to Mississauga Transit and the GO, or who can drive and park at the nearest GO Station. These are the people I’m talking about convincing to take GO.

          • DGM

            No one living in St. Catherines should expect rapid transit to and from Toronto. All bets are off once you choose to live that far from work. Public transit is meant to allow people to move freely within the city, not to let people live as far away as they like.

          • Dave

            Finally a voice of reason.

          • Testu

            It’s not totally unreasonable though. England has a great commuter rail system that allows people from well outside London to travel to and from work in the city without any of the hassles we have with GO.

            For some reason we’ve spent the last 20 years dismantling our rail network in Ontario, shutting down lines and cutting service, instead of expanding it to service more regions and making it a practical alternative to driving for long trips.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            “That far”? It’s 60-90 minutes by car depending on volume, and they actually run trains farther than that (to Niagara Falls).

            But both you and vamp are missing the point: being reliant on other modes of transit (such as the bus, even the GO bus) to connect you to the GO train can make it (the train) unrealistic as an option for daily commuting.

            (GO could make it an option for St Catharines and area if they ran the train like any other commute train.)

          • OgtheDim

            St. Cats is a LOONG way away for the province to provide decent commuter service. Heck, they can’t provide Bolton to TO daytime back and forth service.

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            St Cats isn’t far at all. Even one train at each rush hour would take a few hundred cars off our streets.

            (It also has five times the population of Bolton, and it’s in a tourist area.)

        • matthewfabb

          Later in June the Lakeshore line will be going every 30 minutes. That will be a HUGE step forward for getting people to take the GO Train. As missing a train and waiting a full hour for the next one can really suck.

          The other step also being done in increasing the size of GO station parking lots. As others have mentioned, adding local transit to the ride, especially slow Mississauga transit can really add to the time. However, most parking lots in Mississauga and other places in the suburbs fill up very early in the morning (before 7 am in some places). Then people start parking illegally everywhere, risking a ticket over getting to work on time. In many places it’s not convincing them to park their cars, it’s LETTING them park their cars. That said, parking expansions are currently happening in many GO Stations but it will still be some time before they finish (Oakville’s staton recently completed).

  • blearghhh

    The first two times I read that last one I thought it was saying that people would be going to the hospital to recover from surgery they got at home.

  • OgtheDim

    What? A university get lazy with academic standards when money is offered?

    I am shocked and appalled. Shocked I say.

  • HotDang

    Hopefully the infamous crack video is on that grey toshiba laptop. We can’t be rid of this clown Ford fast enough. And I hope for his own sake that after he is deposed he enters some well-earned rehab.

    • Brock

      There was never a video. That is very old at this point.

      • HotDang

        Rob Ford is like a clown car, except he is full of fuck ups instead of clowns. Every time he’s screws up again you are amazed at how he manages to continue to push the boundaries of incompetence.

        He started off as a clueless git incessantly shouting about insignificant office budgets in council, fighting against bike lanes, and helping those in need. Then he started making offensive racial comments, then he started showing up drunk and belligerent in public, then admits he was caught driving while high.

        Then having reached the bounds of incompetence for a city councillor, he needed more power to be able to screw up more effectively, so he became mayor.

        His escapades continued: passing streetcars while passengers were loading, reading and texting while driving, losing control of council, being kicked out of galas for being too intoxicated, public gropings, nearly losing his job, repeated losses on the transit file. And none of this mentions the well documented cavorting with drug dealers and all-too-obvious crack smoking.

        His screw-ups are like entropy. It’s a law of the universe that they must increase in magnitude as time goes on. After Rob is elected Prime Minister in 2018, successfully running on a campaign of having burned three fifths of Toronto to the ground, (which will really connect with the rural voters), he will declare war on America in attempt to claim Buffalo for Canada so that we’ll finally have an NFL team.

        • Brock

          You have rambled on with several issues and really minimal fact. And your head is in the clouds. The real truth is he was elected to protect the tax payer and to bring new capital and growth to the city. Even with the relentless leftist effort to discourage progress.

          • dsmithhfx

            “bring new capital and growth to the city”

            Drug gangs weren’t mentioned in his platform.

          • Brock

            This from the smartest person in the room.

        • tyrannosaurus_rek

          “Rob Ford is like a clown car, except he is full of fuck ups instead of clowns.”

          I nominate this for the next Duly Quoted.

          • Brock

            There are too many syllables in this quote for you to comprehend.

          • Zoom Slider

            Speaking of quotes:

            “have attempted to maintain a civil conversation with everyone” — Brock, elsewhere in this very same thread.

      • the_lemur

        Even the Sun is now referring to it as the ‘Rob Ford crack video scandal’ as if it’s a thing.

  • XXX

    Toronto Council is really doing a bang up job now that Ford has been marginalized.

    • dsmithhfx

      Now? You only just noticed?

      • XXX

        Killing jobs, stifling revenue streams, debating grass vs astroturf and cutting deals with Adrian Heaps it is like Miller never left.

        • Brock

          The left council has wasted tax dollars for years, remember the backlash when Ford cut their expense budgets? It was like their little free spending world came to a halt.

          • XXX

            Vaughn and friends circumvented their budget limits months ago: http://www.torontosun.com/2012/10/28/council-porkers-quietly-boost-office-budgets

          • XXX

            Sadly in the near future we might be referring to the current shenanigans as the good old days, http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2010/11/06/layton_and_chow_the_milliondollar_power_couple.html

          • Brock

            No one with a half a brain would vote for Chow. She has been leaching off the government for her own personal benefit since here and Jack were councilors. The fact they they both lived government housing at a huge discount while collecting massive salaries at city hall speaks for itself on where her priorities lie.

          • the_lemur

            It was not ‘government housing’ but a mixed-income development. Mixed income requires some residents to have higher incomes than the average, which they did, for which they paid a correspondingly higher rent. When their income went up, they increased their rent payments – voluntarily, I might add.

          • allisonjayne

            I live in a co-op. Stop posting this BS. They paid market rent in a mixed co-op, similar to the one I live in. Some residents (ours sits at 30%) received subsidies based on financial need.
            I pay market rent to live in my building, and support the work of the co-op by volunteering my time. Our subsidies used to be government funding (as part of an affordable housing strategy) but we recently lost that, so are now funding them internally with a levy on those of us who can afford it.
            Seriously, one of the main reasons I hope Olivia Chow runs is so that some idiots start up this ‘co-op leaches’ thing again and get the dialogue going about what co-ops ACTUALLY ARE because it’s super irritating that people don’t understand how they work.

          • the_lemur

            Wait, are you saying they didn’t pay market rent, or were doing something else wrong?

          • allisonjayne

            Oh, oops…my comment was for the_lemur…I think the original comment I was replying to was deleted.

          • XXX

            Paying $800.00 per month for a 3 bedroom downtown apartment worth an estimated $1500.00/month on the open market for 3 people for 5 years of which the combined income from 2 of them was $120,000.00 a year(No one knows how much Olivia’s mother was earning, if anything) and then topping it up by $325.00 for the last 3 months just doesn’t seem to add up.
            Some might say that Jack and Olivia knew the shit was going to hit the fan and tried to diffuse.

            h/t Bocanut

            http://drdawgsblawg.ca/2011/04/lousy-dirty-liberal-politics-ii.shtml

            Interesting that the comments here are so bold, Olivia has been remarkably mute on the topic…

          • OgtheDim

            Mind you, compared to the video that the cops seem to know existed before Gawker…

          • Brock

            Are you implying a police cover up?

          • B

            So you are implying a police cover up?

          • OgtheDim

            Little B, Big B…what begins with B?

            Bouncy Baby Bubbles and a BumbleBee

          • XXX

            Bears beats Battlestar Galactica!

          • HotDang

            *beets. Dwight is a beet farmer, not a drummer.

          • XXX

            Judging by the amount of dro I smell walking the streets these days, the mayor is in good company…

          • the_lemur

            The link you posted seems to support the view that they were not doing anything wrong.

          • the_lemur

            Where are those figures from?

          • OgtheDim

            Wikipedia

          • allisonjayne

            so…anyone who makes a lot of money should be forced to live somewhere expensive? I don’t get it.

            Olivia and Jack likely wanted to live in a co-op for the same reasons I do – great community, lovely building, people working together to make a communal space wonderful, etc. I pay less than a lot of my peers as co-ops are non-profits, rent does tend to be a little cheaper than the average.

            My wife and I could probably afford a more expensive place to live, but we choose to live in a co-op because we love it, and it allows us to save more money for (hopefully) a downpayment and our kid’s education. I’m guessing Jack and Olivia did the same thing. I don’t get the vitriol at all.

          • XXX

            Some people view that as gaming the system, and don’t accept that the “market rent” in a government subsidized facility truly reflects the market… their is also an element of hypocrisy in the sense that the NDP is typically portrayed as a party that protects the poor but here were two people who were in no sense poor possibly taking housing away from a family that may have had greater need…

          • allisonjayne

            A co-op is not government subsidized, there are individual units which receive subsidy based on financial need. Is that really hard to understand? The rest of the units in a co-op are thus unsubsidized. They are often (but not always) slightly lower than average rents, because the co-op runs as a non-profit rather than a landlord/rental company seeking to make money.
            There’s no hypocrisy at all. Co-ops in Toronto are intended as mixed communities. I’m sure the board of directors (decisions are co-ops members – aka tenants – are made by a board) who interviewed them felt that they would be an asset to the community. Same way decisions are made at my co-op, we look at a bunch of different factors (diversity, community involvement, etc etc) before making a decision about new members.
            There’s no ‘need’ when it comes to non-subsidized units in a co-op. They are not subsidized. I don’t get why that’s hard to understand?

          • vampchick21

            I think people are confusing Co-op with Toronto Housing or Ontario Housing. I know that’s what I had in mind watching this discussion, but what you are describing seems to be different from that.

          • allisonjayne
          • vampchick21

            thanks for the link! I’d never heard of co-op housing before now, only Toronto/Ontario Housing.

          • Dave

            ummm hmmm.

          • vampchick21

            Really brock/davewilliams? REALLY????? I have had more than enough of your crap here.

          • Dave

            Allison if the rules permit it anyone should have the ability to live in co-op. However, how would you feel if you could only afford a co-op and it was occupied by people that were able to afford a market rate unit somewhere else and you could not get in because of it?

          • allisonjayne

            As I said above: Co-ops in Toronto are intended as mixed communities. I’m sure the board of directors (decisions on co-op members – aka tenants – are made by a board) who interviewed them felt that they would be an asset to the community. Same way decisions are made at my co-op, we look at a bunch of different factors (diversity, community involvement, etc etc) before making a decision about new members.
            There are huge waiting lists for co-ops in Toronto regardless. I don’t presume to know the income of everyone currently living in a co-op. There are people in my building who make more than me, and could probably afford to live somewhere else. It doesn’t bother me at all….I enjoy living in a diverse community.

          • Dave

            I understand the co-op system, Jack and Olivia lived in a subsidized unit though.

          • allisonjayne

            Pretty sure everything I’ve read about it says they lived in one of the co-op’s un-subsidized units (a bit of googling reveals that their co-op had the same ratio of subsidy as mine – 30% subsidized, the rest market).

          • Dave

            Theirs was subsidized. When they were discovered they volunteered to raise their own rent. The additional rent did not meet market value. They lived in the unit 5 years before they were found out.

          • the_lemur

            They raised their own rent before the Star’s hack attempted to expose them, on a tip from the integritous Tom Jakobek.

          • Dave

            Preemptive guilt?

          • the_lemur

            That suggests they developed a conscience or a sense of ethics without a journalist needing to appear to prod them to do so. Is that really the narrative you’re trying to present here?

          • Dave

            So three months before they vacate they suddenly develop a conscience?

          • the_lemur

            Maybe you could decide what’s more relevant: a) that they already paid more than others, b) that they paid more on top of that, c) that they were planning to move out eventually anyway, d) that the hack at the Star thought he was blowing the lid off something that actually would have been a story but proved to have no substance, e) anything else?
            Does it matter when they began paying more if the Star’s ‘exposé’ came after that and had no merit?
            Does it matter at what point you stop being disingenuous?

          • allisonjayne

            Source? Everything I’ve read said it was a market rent unit.

          • XXX

            “Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. provided the 75-unit Hazelburn Co-op with a 2 per cent mortgage, which costs the taxpayers $405,000 a year. The Laytons want to remain in the co-op and say they recently began paying an extra $325 a month to the co-op to offset the CMHC subsidy on the unit.”

            http://condoresidentsagainstoliviachow.blogspot.com/2011/04/layton-should-stay-in-co-op-group-says.html

          • allisonjayne

            Sigh. Yes, 30 years ago, a bunch of co-ops in Toronto (mine among them) received some funding to help with their mortgages via the CMHC (who also provide: mortgage loan insurance, mortgage-backed securities, housing policy and programs, and housing research). That’s like saying that rich kids who go to public universities are leaching the system, because the government ‘subsidizes’ the cost of education.

            It’s not a subsidy. They did not live in a subsidized unit.

            Co-ops were provided with the mortgages as part of a national housing strategy, and were always intended to be mixed-income. Jack and Olivia were doing absolutely nothing wrong.

            http://www.urbancentre.utoronto.ca/pdfs/researchassociates/1986_Hulchanski_Canadas-Co-op-Housing-Program_Conf-paper.pdf

          • XXX

            You said the units were not subsidized. They were. Justify it anyway you want you were wrong. The subsidy was non-trivial: 41% ($325 against $800 rent). It would also be interesting to see an accounting of Hazelburn’s “market rental” formula because $800 for a three bedroom unit sounds ridiculously low even in the ’90′s

          • allisonjayne

            It wasn’t a subsidized unit. I’m not wrong. Co-ops received some arms-length funding in the 80s to assist with mortgages as part of a strategy to provide affordable housing for moderate income people (a combined income of $120,000 is more than my family, but not rich by any stretch. I’m quite sure there are people in my co-op who make that much).
            Co-ops are non-profit housing, so the rents tend to be lower because there’s no one seeking a profit. They were living in an non-subsidized unit, in a building that yes, got some mortgage assistance in the 80s as part of a housing strategy. As I said, it’s akin to saying that anyone who goes to a public university is receiving a subsidy.

            $800 for a 3 bedroom in the 90s doesn’t seem that low to me. Co-ops aren’t fancy condos. I can’t speak for that particular building, but seriously, every co-op unit I’ve visited (in my building and others) is….let’s just say basic.

          • dsmithhfx

            “Olivia Chow… Bad for Condo Residents” Really? How? Why are record numbers of condos being built right now in the GTA? Is it a conspiracy by builders to feed more condo residents to Olivia Chow? That’s horrible! No, really. Does she eat babies and kittens, too? Please don’t spare the details! You could get a mention in SAL’s column!

          • Dave

            From time to time Jack Layton has been criticized for saying one thing and doing
            another, including being caught red-handed in living in subsidized housing in
            Toronto when his and Olivia Chow, then a Toronto trustee, were raking in a
            combined $120,000 year.

            “Jack once told me many years after that incident
            that it is the one thing he has never able to purge or expunge from the public’s
            mind, this apparent contradiction,” said former seatmate Brian Ashton.

          • the_lemur

            Please cite your sources. In this case, the Star, which was shown to have gotten the story wrong (I know how weird that seems to you, Dave, but still.)

          • Dave
          • the_lemur

            That’s just someone else stating the same misconceptions, only with more personal invective.

          • Dave

            Is it a misconception?

          • the_lemur

            Most of the people who bring up this non-story as if it were somehow damning evidence of something tend to misstate one or another of the facts, yes: the fact that it was co-op housing rather than social housing; the fact they paid more than most others to begin with (which is part of what makes mixed-income developments mixed-income), etc.

  • XXX

    “It’s the hospital of the future, today, and as you can imagine, women are behind it.” huh?

    • Testu

      It’s the Women’s College Hospital, you see.

  • OgtheDim

    All other things being equal, if its a choice between somebody who lied about a DUI, and lied about berating some people at the ACC and somebody who didn’t pay enough rent a dozen or so years ago and who’s husband was caught during a vice raid…

    I’d say our choices are being affected by things we really should not have to be dealing with.

    Can we PLEASE get somebody NORMAL to run for mayor?

    • XXX

      I’ll upvote that. I’d also ask (beg?) for someone who can shame these representatives of the people every time they turn the council chamber into a dog and pony show…

      • .Brock

        No matter who runs, there will be skeletons in their closet. With Ford, his skeletons were exposed long before he became mayor. We voted him in on his policies and he has fought tooth and nail to implement what he was voted in to do. To date his political record has minimal flaws, his personal record should be his own private business.

    • Dave

      Paul, is it possible to find such a person?

      • OgtheDim

        Who’s Paul?

    • Testu

      I would love to have a mayor to has the sense not to lie about easily verifiable figures in a goddamn televised council meeting. (https://twitter.com/ddale8/status/345255191978844160 )

      Seriously, just a modicum of respect for the office and civil government in general. Is that too much to ask?

      You’d think that someone who is currently embroiled in a massive scandal and has only recently attempted to deny the allegations would be trying to avoid getting caught lying in public.

      I think his baldfaced contempt for absolutely everyone is what upsets me the most.

  • Gardiner down

    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia has a 13.2 meter deep bore tunnel called the SMART tunnel which is 9km long. 4km of the tunnel is a highway, on two decks.

    For more info on the SMART tunnel see: Wikipedia- http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMART_Tunnel Amusing Planet- http://www.amusingplanet.com/2013/05/smart-tunnel-in-kuala-lumpur-storm.html?m=1

    If we built a similarly-sized or larger tunnel we could build 3 decks … 1 eastbound, 1 westbound, and a deck that has reverse traffic flow to bring cars in and out of the core.

    Put the Gardiner in a deep-bored tunnel running under the CNE grounds and Lakeshore road. The west portal would be at Jameson where it can directly link to the existing lanes of the Gardiner. The east portal could be at Jarvis, where the tunnel would emerge and climb up to the railway berm.

    Or, tunnel under the Don River and emerge at Carlaw (about 6km). The space from Jameson to Bathurst covered by the Gardiner could be opened up to build the Waterfront West LRT and allow GO buses to have direct access to the GO bus station at Union. Finally, exit and entrance ramps could be built for direct access to north-south streets.

    Instead of a highly disruptive 6-lane wide cut & cover tunnel or an 8 lane Lakeshore Boulevard, a deep bore tunnel would take up less space, disrupt fewer roads, and make room for pedestrians and transit.

    Cheers, Moaz

  • Gardiner down

    Even with 2 decks (2 lanes each way) and a stormwater tunnel at the bottom, such a tunnel would probably be enough to carry all the Gardiner’s traffic … especially with the Lakeshore GO expansion and some judicious road connections (e.g. Bremner-Fort York Boulevard) to allow the Waterfront West and East LRT lines to be built.

  • turf wars

    A few years ago I read about an idea to reconnect the U of T campus and Queen’s Park by replacing the west side of Queen’s Park Circle with grass between Hoskin and the south lawn of the legislature.

    There would be one lane for traffic needing to access Wellesley St. and the east entrance of the U of T campus but all through traffic would be shifted to the east side of Queen’s Park Circle.

    That would effectively provide a massive expansion of Queen’s Park and added green space for the city.