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cityscape

Toronto Urban Legends: Is Tim Hortons Spiking the Brew?

Is there any truth to persistent rumours about Tim Hortons adding nicotine to its coffee?

The truth behind the tales people tell about Toronto.

Ever find yourself breaking out in a cold sweat, developing a splitting headache, and tearing a strip off a complete stranger all while craving a cigarette Tim Hortons’ double-double? If the persistent urban legend is true, these fits may be the result of a sinister ploy by the coffee company to ensure that customers return, by adding nicotine to the coffee.

Bean struggling (get it?) to kick the coffee habit? Tim Hortons isn’t to blame. There’s not an ounce of truth, or nicotine, to the legend.

The yarn goes something like this: While visiting family in Toronto for the first time, an American tourist makes frequent trips to the nation’s most recognized coffee house, becoming inexplicably enamoured of Canada’s famous brew. In a tamer version of the legend, the sorry sod returns stateside green around the gills. A visit to the doctor reveals nicotine coursing through his veins. Since the tourist is a nonsmoker, his doctor is baffled. Further tests reveal that a copious amount of nicotine-laden coffee ingested during his romp north is the source of the health scare.

In a more sinister version, the American meets his demise in a Tim Hortons. Deathly allergic to nicotine, a single sip brings on cardiac arrest. Another version has a teenage girl’s heart bursting the instant her extra-large combines with the effects of a nicotine patch.

Tim Hortons is aware of the legend. They address it directly, here. Michelle Robichaud, public relations manager for Tim’s, told Torontoist unequivocally, “There is in fact nothing added to our coffee. We believe that our guests are addicted to consistency.”

Supplementing coffee with nicotine would not only be illegal, it would be extremely unhealthy.

Nicotine is derived from members of the nightshade family of plants. Scientifically known as Solanaceae, these include tobacco, of course, but also some edible plants, like potatoes and bell peppers, both of which have been found to contain vanishingly small amounts of nicotine.

In its purest form, nicotine is more potent than toxins like strychnine, cyanide, and arsenic. It can be used as an agricultural insecticide.

Yuck!

It’s clearly implausible that Tim Hortons would deliberately poison its customers. So how did the rumour get started? Finding the source of an urban legend is impossible. Tracing its propagation, however, is easier. Urban legends relating to nicotine have a history. In the ’80s, there were tales about McDonald’s adding nicotine to hamburgers. In the ’90s, Pokémon cards were rumoured to be laced with the substance. Today in the U.S., Starbucks coffee has its own nicotine legend.

Why Tim Hortons? Possible explanations include envy.

No one denies that caffeine, a naturally occurring stimulant found in coffee beans, is addictive, but it’s nowhere near as potent as nicotine. Even so, Tim Hortons has been wildly successful at selling caffeine. Founded by the late NHLer in 1964, the business has grown from a few Hamilton outlets into a force to be reckoned with. Nationwide, 80 per cent of all single servings of coffee purchased today are poured from a Tim Hortons’ carafe.

No doubt some would like to see Tim Hortons spend time in the penalty box, just ’cause.

If it’s nicotine you crave, light up a cig. On second thought, butt out and get your jolt from a mug of joe. Caffeine is less addictive, and it’s not nearly as unhealthy. You’ll have a nice, long life to spend contemplating urban legends.

Comments

  • torontothegreat

    I would imagine this rumour was started by those that actually enjoy a properly brewed coffee from a tasty bean. I’d imagine it went something like this:

    “Dude, how the f can people drink that Timmie’s swill?”
    “They must put nicotine in it, it’s the only explanation”

    • HotDang

      These hypothetical chatters have apparently never been introduced to the concepts of affordability and convenience.

      • torontothegreat

        How so? Any decent coffee shop has both already.
        I would argue that those that drink timmies (let’s cut down a rain forest) crap, have no concept of what they can get for their buck or the convenience of shopping around to get the best product.

        • vampchick21

          Having grown up in small towns, I can tell you that your choices are far fewer and far between than in an urban centre. Heck, where I went to high school, your choices for a cuppa joe were Coffee Time and one of the 6 restaurants on the main drag (not counting McDonalds, which back in the 80′s and 90′s was not known for it’s coffee that sat in the carafe until it was empty, sometimes hours on end). And the restaurants didn’t offer to go. (although the java at Olympic in that town was amazing)

          • torontothegreat

            Also having grown up in a very small town (2,000 ppl) I can tell those are all a moot points with the invention of the internet…

          • vampchick21

            This is true :) Plus at least nearly every tiny town has a Timmies, which as chains go is better than Coffee Time….lol. In addition, I know the town I grew up in now has independant cafes to go along with the chains. Times change I suppose. (although really, having the internet in Nowhere, ON doesn’t actually get you a good cup of coffee to go)

          • torontothegreat

            Thing is, if you don’t actually care about the environment and “real” fair-trade (and a good bean) you’re just going to go to Tim’s in the first place. If you do care, you’ll most likely brew your own cup and use your re-usable container to drink from with properly sourced beans you’ve ordered from the internet.

            Those of us in an urban centre, have obvious advantages in terms of choice, which makes my point against this statement “concepts of affordability and convenience” still standing.

          • vampchick21

            See the points by “hungry” above.

          • torontothegreat

            That poor people are too poor to care about anything but working? What a load of crap. I’ve cared about all of these things, when I’ve been poor all the way to now and I was poor for the majority of my life. When I say poor, I mean I’ve been completely homeless, no welfare, on welfare, on forced government labour… blah blah blah.

            Being poor has nothing to do with one’s justification of being lazy and uncaring about the planet.

          • vampchick21

            Forget it dude, you actually only like to pick a side and argue into the ground, not once acknowledging another’s point of view, instead relegating them to ignorant, lazy, whatever. It’s gotten boring and frankly, looking at lolcats is a better use of my time online than going in circles on a blog comment section with a mule.

          • torontothegreat

            I’m confused, we both agreed then you suddenly disagreed with me citing some rant from someone who is too lazy to care in the first place. Sorry if I’m misunderstanding your point.

          • vampchick21

            You fustrate me, you really do. What I am taking umbrage with is the fact that you decided willy-nilly that based soley on someone’s blog comment post that they are 100% lazy and ignorant when maybe they are busted broke and exhausted. I’m reasonably well off, but I work two damn jobs and honestly, in my free time sometimes I’d rather take a goddamn nap and eat a bag of chips than go all over the city looking for ethically sourced food items and cook. And that anyone who didn’t 100% agree with every word you are saying doesn’t care about the planet. Do you even see how that stance makes you come across?

          • torontothegreat

            What does broke, busted, exausted have to do with this outlandlish claim:

            “You have to be relatively fortunate, in life, for the ethics of basic consumer necessities to become a battle that’s worth your energy.”

          • vampchick21

            In other words “I’m literally too damn tired today from working overtime to make rent to even think about sourcing an ethical cup of coffee. Instead I shall make a half-hearted attempt at laundry, maybe, possibly swipe a damp cloth over the top of that pile of dishes in the sink, maybe, and then sleep until I have to wake up and start my daily battle to not end up on the street with all my worldly goods in boxes.”
            Does that help?

          • torontothegreat

            Sourcing? Great news, you don’t have to! The coffee shop where you choose to spend your hard earned money will already do that for you! :)

            “then sleep until I have to wake up and start my daily battle to not end up on the street with all my worldly goods in boxes”

            And if you don’t care about how our ingredients affect the planet, you won’t even have a street to sleep on! Sounds Win:Win to me!

          • vampchick21

            I give up. Whatever. People are evil. There you go. Happy now?

          • torontothegreat

            Nope, people aren’t evil. We all just make some pretty piss poor decisions sometimes and that’s okay. Just own it! It’s cool, but don’t tell me ’bout your white Jesus!

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Neville-Ross/100002343524258 Neville Ross

            If you are poor and cannot afford to buy the kind of food you think hungry should have bought, how would you use these ‘advantages’?

          • torontothegreat

            Are we still talking about coffee or do you have another subject you’d like to bring up? Living in an urban centre means more convenience and more choice, which hungry claimed poor people have little of, hence the need to go to a Tim Hortons. Are you saying that living in an urban centre means less choice and things are less affordable?

          • Eric S. Smith

            I can get a cup of coffee from the Internet, now?

          • vampchick21

            “Where’s my Tab?” – Homer Simpson

          • torontothegreat

            Yes.

          • vampchick21

            When did the internet start automatically pouring you a cuppa to go? Isn’t that the entire damn point of a Tim Hortons or Starbucks or Second Cup or whatever? A cup to go? Be it the one they give you or the reusable one you have? Cause, you know, here in reality land, when I’m running errands and could use a cup of coffee, I’m not going back home to grind my ethically sourced beans and brew a single cup. I’m going to stop into a coffee shop, be it a chain or an independant, and buy a cup. And if I have one of my resuables in my bag at the time, I’ll get it in that, but otherwise it’s gonna be in the cup they have. Ideals are not always 100% executable in real life and that’s what you are refusing to acknowledge, instead choosing to mock people who relate their experience and choices and calling them lazy and ignorant and uncaring. In short, it makes you look like an unsufferable jackass that people want to kick in the teeth.

          • torontothegreat

            Oh you want a BREWED cup of coffee, sorry you should have clarified ;)

          • vampchick21

            The day the internet pours me a brewed cup of coffee is the day I stop leaving my house.

      • hungry

        I agree. Everyone I know who is lower-income loves Tim Hortons. Their whole menu is fast and cheap. Their locations are everywhere. When I left my wallet at home one day and had $4 to get lunch and five minutes to get back to the office, I went to Tim Hortons and walked out with enough food and beverage to feel full. And I had change!

        If someone thinks other coffee shops are less expensive and more convenient, I’d argue they don’t worry about money and convenience as much as the people they preach to.

        My own experience of being poor is that I spent my time working, rushing around frantically and sleeping, not researching the environmental impact of my coffee. You have to be relatively fortunate, in life, for the ethics of basic consumer necessities to become a battle that’s worth your energy. Fortunately there are lots of well-to-do liberal activist types to fight those battles for us while we try to keep the electricity on.

        That’s what I hate about people who knock fast food; until you can get that brown rice pasta with kale, organic chicken and dried cranberries for two dollars in five minutes, you can’t really shame other people for not choosing it. Fast food fills a hole in this city that “healthier options” fail to.

        • torontothegreat

          4 paragraphs of horse shit.

          Being poor means you work all the time and have no time for anything but working? LOL
          So only POOR people go to Tim Hortons? LOL
          Poor people are too poor to care about where their ingredients come from? LOL
          You can’t buy healthy food for cheap? LOL

          Thanks for the laugh…

          • hungry

            4 laughs had at statements that I did not, in fact, make.

            I never said being poor means you have virtually no time. But if you have a lower-paying job, you have to make up for the lack of money with more working hours. So yes, you have less time – and when you have free time, it’s more fun to spend it napping or having fun than cooking in your kitchen. Many of the nine-to-fivers I know, in fact, don’t work excessive hours but would still rather get takeout than cook. Myself included.

            I never said “only poor people go to Tim Hortons.” I said that Tim Hortons is especially popular with the lower-income people I know, for whom cost and convenience are much more critical factors.

            I never said poor people are too poor to care about ingredients. I said actually doing something about it takes energy, and when you’re poor, sometimes have you have bigger battles to deal with than comparison shopping for the most ethical cup of coffee.

            And yes, you can buy healthy food for cheap. But usually that means making it yourself, which takes time you may not have, and access to a kitchen at that particular moment. And usually it involves ingredients that are perishable, which can be wasteful when you’re poor. And usually it’s less filling, short term, than – say – eating three bagels with cream cheese. And if you’ve been eating fast food for the aforementioned reasons a lot, your palate tends to like fast food more, so healthy food is actually less tasty.

            In summary: I can’t believe this is that contentious, but, uh, being poor is does not actually allow you to have the same lifestyle as being better-off. And that affects a lot of aspects of life, including your consumer choices.

            So if I’m right that poor people eat at Coffee Time and Tim Hortons more than, say, Jet Fuel or Dark Horse or whatever – and I have a time believing you’d argue with that – you can either assume that they’re lazy, ignorant and immoral, or you can assume that they might actually be operating pretty logically based on the limitations that being poor comes with.

            I’m with the latter camp, personally.

          • torontothegreat

            ” if you have a lower-paying job, you have to make up for the lack of money with more working hours. So yes, you have less time – and when you have free time, it’s more fun to spend it napping or having fun than cooking in your kitchen”

            So your own laziness and lack of care. Nothing to do with being poor. I won’t even bother reading the rest of your drivel.

          • hungry

            You know, you might consider that your experience of poverty, the options that were available to you while poor, and the right moral choices for you – are not necessarily the same for everyone else who is poor in Toronto.

          • torontothegreat

            You’ve illustrated my point beautifully, thank you very much!

            You also stated that you’d rather “nap or have fun” than care about the environment, so it has more to do with your own lack of integrity as a human being than it does with your financial situation. Believe it or not, you can have integrity and character as a human on this planet w/o being rich.

          • hungry

            Uh, I said I’d rather nap or have fun than cook.

            This habit you have of completely misconstruing what I’m saying isn’t very productive. I could just as easily claim you believe “rich Torontonians are more moral” since statistically they consume more organic products than poor people do. But I wouldn’t misconstrue your words like that, because I don’t believe it counts as winning an argument if you defeat assertions no one was actually making.

            Anyway, it’s not in any human’s capacity to be 100% committed to taking action in every way possible for every worthy cause that’s out there. Nor is it everyone’s chosen lifestyle to be a 24/7 activist. If a poor person decides that drinking sustainable coffee isn’t a battle they want to choose, I’m not going to fault them for it. When I was poor, that certainly wasn’t a priority for me. It doesn’t mean I was lazy or ignorant, it means I had to choose what to prioritize, and sustainable coffee in particular didn’t make the list. Now I’m sure you’ll accuse me of jerking off to photos of environment devastation, and that’s fine. You’re entitled to your misinterpretations. But until you’ve had my experience, you can’t truly know that you wouldn’t make the same judgment call.

          • torontothegreat

            “This habit you have of completely misconstruing what I’m saying isn’t very productive.”

            Really? I’m misconstruing this statement?

            “You have to be relatively fortunate, in life, for the ethics of basic consumer necessities to become a battle that’s worth your energy.”

            Not much to misconstrue there bud.

            “I could just as easily claim you believe “rich Torontonians are more moral” since statistically they consume more organic products than poor people do.”

            Citation needed. Anecdotes aren’t welcome as “statistical evidence”.

            ” I don’t believe it counts as winning an argument if you defeat assertions no one was actually making.”

            So now you’re claiming you never said this?

            “You have to be relatively fortunate, in life, for the ethics of basic consumer necessities to become a battle that’s worth your energy.”

            ALLLLLLllllllriiiighhhtyyyy than…”

            “Anyway, it’s not in any human’s capacity to be 100% committed to taking action in every way possible for every worthy cause that’s out there.”

            Wow, who’s misconstruing words NOW? I’m saying you could care about where you COFFEE comes from… Talk about a Red Herring.

            ” Nor is it everyone’s chosen lifestyle to be a 24/7 activist.”

            Buying coffee that doesn’t destroy our planet is “activism” now? Please, please tell us moar!”

            ” If a poor person decides that drinking sustainable coffee isn’t a battle they want to choose, I’m not going to fault them for it.”

            There you go again! Equating poverty with the environmental impact of where a coffee bean comes from. Are you going to turn around and claim that I misconstruing that now?

            “When I was poor, that certainly wasn’t a priority for me.”

            Wasn’t a priority for YOU and I’ll bet dollars to donuts, it still isn’t. Being poor had absolutely NOTHING to do with it.

            “It doesn’t mean I was lazy or ignorant”

            Actually, it sorta does…

            “Now I’m sure you’ll accuse me of jerking off to photos of environment devastation, and that’s fine.”

            MOOAARRRRR RED HERRINGS!!!!!!!

            “You’re entitled to your misinterpretations”

            See above.

            “But until you’ve had my experience, you can’t truly know that you wouldn’t make the same judgment call.”

            And your experiences give you a get out of caring about the planet card now? Ohhhh. I get it!

          • Tristan

            ‘I could just as easily claim you believe “rich Torontonians are more moral”‘
            Look at his username; he almost certainly believes that.

          • torontothegreat

            Please stay in whatever backwoods hick village you livein. K. thx bye

          • vampchick21

            You really are a stubbron one.

          • http://twitter.com/aberranteyes Austin Loomis

            To paraphrase an American politician who later fell off the left side of the Republican party: Stubbornness in the pursuit of having people engage your actual words is no vice. Determination to edit your opponent’s argument into one you can beat is no virtue.

          • torontothegreat

            I stubbornly defend this planet, yes. Us aboriginals take that shit pretty serious.

    • Peter

      LOL So true. I used to drink that filth but now…I have no idea what the fuck was wrong with me. Or wrong with people that drink that mess.

    • Tristan

      Good work fighting the stereotype that Torontoist readers are all horrible middle class latte liberals there dude

      • torontothegreat

        We’re talking about drip coffee, not espresso. Get with the program “there dude”.

        Also if fools like you want to believe that I’m a middle class latte liberal, I can’t help you with how ridiculously un-intelligent that comes across. For one, I’m not middle class and secondly, I prefer a nice Cappuccino over a latte any day and thirdly, I vote NDP.

      • the_lemur

        Can we maybe get past the idea that coffee is somehow linked to personal ideology, as if there aren’t, say, latte-drinking conservatives or whatever?

  • Peter

    “We believe that our guests are addicted to consistency.”

    Are you joking?

    When I was a Timmy’s customer I was constantly pissed off because the coffee varied with the location, time of day and employee serving it. It got to the point where I would only line up at a specific location at a specific time in a specific employee’s line, because only then would I be able to trust the kind of coffee I was about to spend my hard-earned money on.

    After considering how ridiculous this solution was, I figured out a better one: don’t buy Tim Horton’s coffee anymore and replace it with actual coffee elsewhere.

    • vampchick21

      Wow….just….that’s hardcore man. Did Timmy’s kick your puppy too? It’s a damn coffee chain for crying out loud. Not actually worth stressing out over.

  • Peter

    Sorry for spamming this comment board but I’m pretty passionate about anti-Timmy sentiment…

    I wanted to share a poem I wrote about Timmy’s.

    Lament to Tim Hortons.

    “Oh Timmy, dear Timmy, growing up you were such a treat, so fresh, so clean and so tasty.

    And now, we have both matured, you have succumbed to temptation, to grow, to stretch, to become .. more than you should.

    Here I sit, drinking your vile brew, wondering, what happened to my dear, sweet, innocent Timmy’s? You are but an image of a tasty past .. now only a facade.

    Remember the good days, and pray, for fresh coffee, for tasty beans, and remember your time of glory, for it is long past.”

    - Disenchanted

    • vampchick21

      You might want to get a new hobby.

  • tyrannosaurus_rek

    As a non-coffee drinker it amuses me to hear people claim one brand or source of the brown swill is better than another.

    • torontothegreat

      Nothing to do with “brand” or “source” (source, in how you’re implying). Coffee is the 2nd largest traded commodity in the world and is something that needs to be cultivated over a long period of time. Because of it’s popularity it’s most often grown in ways that aren’t sustainable to the environment and grown “fast” to get to market, thus decreasing the quality of the end product.

      Roasted beans also “go bad” immediately after being roasted. Therefore, the longer it takes to reach your cup, the more bitter the flavour. It’s best served from a fresh roasted bean.

      It’s a comparison between good quality and bad quality, period.

      Also, there is nothing “amusing” about clear-cutting rain forests just so one can enjoy a “double double” from a local Tim Hortons.

      • torontothegreat

        Cool that someone down-voted the idea of caring about the future of the planet by the ingredients that we buy. You sir/madame are not only a coward, you’re a piece of shit.

        • stopitman2001

          It’s kind of silly to say you care for the environment when either way you’re using a product that makes very intensive use of both water and fuel to be shipped half way around the world (and get those beans out from fairly remote places in some cases).

          • torontothegreat

            Pretty much the equivalent to saying:

            “It’s kind of silly to say you care for the environment when either way you’re breathing CO2 into the air”

            Plants require water, what you are referring to are arabica beans that clear cut rain forests. Yes, these plants require lots of water as they are not shade grown. Coffee naturally prefers to be shade grown. Shade grown coffee beans use very little water as the shade stores the water and secretes it over a slower period of time – so no, I don’t use a product that requries “intensive use of water”

            Food products require fuel to reach me and unless you have a good alternative to how I can get that sustenance to my table (perhaps, magic unicorns flying it in?), it’s a fact of life. I consume less, and pick my source wisely.

            Many products that we require for our diet are from remote “half way around the world” Lentils are a good example of that, speaking of “beans”

            Saying I don’t care about the environment is a bit hyperbolic, no?

          • stopitman

            I didn’t say you don’t care about the environment, I just think it’s silly to go on a big thing about picking beans based on their source when either way one cup of coffee requires 140L of water for just the growing alone (110B m^3 of water/yr for coffee). Add in the oil and the processes behind it, plus the shipping (and the resources behind the steel, etc.) and it’s quite the footprint.

            And breathing is natural and required. Shipping something across the world because you don’t get enough sleep at night or because you enjoy it is different.

          • torontothegreat

            I think you have a misunderstanding on sustainable farming and what exactly an ecological footprint is.

            Sun grown coffee

            “To expand operations and speed up the growing cycle, farmers create “sun” plantations by cutting down more and more of the natural rainforest. Along with producing inferior coffee, sun farms lead to deforestation, soil erosion, extensive use of synthetic pesticides, and water pollution. Destroying native habitat affects the bird, animal, and plant populations”

            “And breathing is natural and required.”

            So is sustenance, what’s your point? Unless of course you don’t realize that coffee has health benefits? Mind you, you’ve conveniently missed my previous points about food production and how oil, water and such are needed for us as a human race to actually survive — convenient of you, huh?

            Also while 140/litres per cup sounds cray cray it’s simply FUD in the context of our point.

            It also takes 2400 litres of water to create a hamburger, 2000 litres to create a t-shirt, 140 litres to create a cup of coffee, 32 litres of water to create a microchip, regular washing machines use 150 litres per wash, dishwashers can use 50 litres per wash, the average garden can use between 25-40% of a home’s total water consumption, a 3 star energy efficient showerhead uses 9 litres of water per minute, a regular showerheads use between 15-20 litres per minute, a pair of jeans takes about 10,000 liters of water to make, 20 oz soda takes 234 liters of water to produce, a plastic bottle uses approximately 7 liters of water to produce and a cup of milk and a cup of cereal take approximately 250 liters and 450 liters of water respectively.

            As you can see, water is kind of important to producing things (it’s a key component to the source of life, after all). By drinking shade grown coffee (and of course, in moderation) not only do you save the habitat you actually provide nitrate and needed nutrients BACK to the soil, thus creating a much smaller environmental footprint.

            As you can see it’s disingenuous for you to suggest that it’s “silly” to care about where and how our sustenance is grown and produced, just as it’s quite important to care about where your “bean” comes from and how it’s grown.

            While I appreciated your tenacity in proving me wrong, I’d suggest a bit more diligence in your education when you do a Google search to produce a counter-argument.

          • Guest

            My argument has nothing to do with magic unicorns, rather that is there a good enough reason to take on the costs (monetary, environmental, etc) of shipping something across the world for health benefits, pure enjoyment, or because you don’t get enough sleep?

            I am also well aware of the costs of other things that are manufactured and things like jeans or shirts last me quite a while for that reason (5-10 years for jeans, 2-3+ years for shirts). But I also rarely spend my days ripping on every poster for liking Tims (which I don’t have unless I’m out somewhere).

          • torontothegreat

            Firstly, let’s add some context and perspective to something you keep writing in a laissez-faire tone.

            Coffee beans aren’t jelly beans. If jelly beans stopped being shipped across the world it would have very little impact. If coffee stopped being shipped across the world, the economic impact would be absolutely devastating to quite a few nations.

            Coffee is historically been part of human culture for many, many centuries as has wine. I don’t drink wine (120/litres of water per class) and I don’t eat eggs (454 litres per egg) so your point is moot, because consumption is all relative to, well… consumption.

            Secondly, your argument basically boils down to: If you’re not living off the basic necessities to survive as a human (ironically typing that on the internet, on a computer) what’s the point, it only serves to destroy the earth. My coffee consumption is relative to your *something* consumption and that’s okay. Taking the time to care about how I’m consuming things and where I’m getting those things from is much more important than your failed innuendo to the opposite.

            But I also rarely spend my days ripping on every poster for liking Tims

            …and yet, here we are. Love the ol’ strawman fallacy, really emphasizes things for ya…

    • the_lemur

      If you drank coffee you’d know that some of it is the opposite of swill and some of it is not.

      • tyrannosaurus_rek

        It all tastes like swill to me, that’s why I don’t drink it.

        (And the greenest environmental policies can’t change that.)

        • torontothegreat

          Tea drinker?

        • the_lemur

          What’s your primary beverage then?

          ——————————

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            Water.

          • the_lemur

            Well, some people are particular about their water. Same thing.

            ——————————

          • tyrannosaurus_rek

            And if I weren’t a water drinker I’d find their Evian vs Dasani vs Fiji tap water debates even more amusing.

  • the_lemur

    There’s also no truth to the rumour that their coffee contains coffee.

  • Melissa

    There is something different about Tim Hortons. If I have coffee from them say, four days in a row and then on the fifth use my grounds at home (still tims) I have a splitting headache. So there is something definitely to their coffee.