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Your Toronto 2014 Issue Navigator

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20120420countrystore

20120420countrystore
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<b>The Country Music Store</b><br /> 2302 Danforth Avenue, then 2889 Danforth Avenue.<br /> <br /> Thrown out of a job following the demise of the Eaton’s catalogue in 1976, Maritimer Ossie Branscombe, along with fellow easterner Charles Larade, established a store devoted to the music they grew up with. Besides carrying indie and mainstream country, Maritime, and Celtic music, the shop held <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJ4ai67el5Q&feature=relmfu">a weekly Saturday jam session</a> for anyone interested in those genres. The community feeling the sessions produced attracted customers like CKLN DJ Steve Pritchard, who told the <em>Star</em> in 2002 that Branscombe “deliberately goes out of his way to educate people about bluegrass and Celtic music. His big motive is to pass the music on.” The jam sessions continued until the store closed in August 2003.<br /> <br /> <em>Image from article on Toronto record stores, the </em>Star<em>, September 26, 1986. Additional material from the April 25, 2002 edition of the</em> Star.<br />
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20120420countrystore

The Country Music Store
2302 Danforth Avenue, then 2889 Danforth Avenue.

Thrown out of a job following the demise of the Eaton’s catalogue in 1976, Maritimer Ossie Branscombe, along with fellow easterner Charles Larade, established a store devoted to the music they grew up with. Besides carrying indie and mainstream country, Maritime, and Celtic music, the shop held a weekly Saturday jam session for anyone interested in those genres. The community feeling the sessions produced attracted customers like CKLN DJ Steve Pritchard, who told the Star in 2002 that Branscombe “deliberately goes out of his way to educate people about bluegrass and Celtic music. His big motive is to pass the music on.” The jam sessions continued until the store closed in August 2003.

Image from article on Toronto record stores, the Star, September 26, 1986. Additional material from the April 25, 2002 edition of the Star.

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