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15 Comments

news

In Other News, 32% Of Torontonians Are Jerks

…because that is how many “either disagree or somewhat disagree with the statement ‘Toronto would benefit from welcoming more new Canadians to the city,’” reports the Globe, according to the same Nanos poll that gave Rob Ford a twenty-four-point lead in the mayor’s race.

Comments

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    Immigrants put Toronto on the economic map.
    Anti-immigrant policy will take Toronto off it.

  • http://undefined spacejack

    What do immigrants have to do with it? The poll asked about “welcoming more new Canadians to the city”. Presumably this 32% are either militant abortionists or hate kids.

  • http://undefined spacejack

    …or militiant xenophiles (forgot to look that word up before I posted.)

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    “New Canadians” is typically used in lieu of “immigrants to Canada” who generally have (or are in the process of) naturalization. HTH.

  • http://undefined spacejack

    The vague wording of the poll was obviously a thinly veiled attempt to paint Ford supporters as xenophobes.
    On that wording, I’d probably say “no benefit” as well; I don’t believe “new” Canadians are superior to “already” Canadians.

  • http://undefined Bobo Fodo the angry clown-o

    This article is another example of a lefty liberal elite controlled media calling the common man in Toronto a “jerk” just because he supports a racist, homophobic, sexist, drunk driving mayoral candidate.
    The common man voted for Bush, twice.
    The common man voted for that German guy with the stache.
    The common man will vote for Rob Ford.
    Give the common man his due.

  • http://undefined Bobo Fodo the angry clown-o

    Yeah, I hate it when the liberal elite media try to paint Ford supporters as xenophobes. I so totally agree with you that new immigrants are “no benefit” but I’m no xenophobe. I just don’t like new immigrants. I also don’t like queers, feminists, liberals, Islamists, cyclists, most pedestrians, people who don’t agree with me and people who don’t look like me but I’m no xenophobe. In fact, some of my best friends are Orientals.

  • http://undefined spacejack

    LOL leftist hates democracy. Tell us something we don’t know.

  • http://undefined spacejack

    Might not be my place to say, but I think you should probably sign up for some hate management classes.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    I call “that law made by that guy who said something about the longer a thread, the probability of referring to German guy with stache is mentioned hits 1″!
    But I can’t say his name.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    There was no talk of superiority, only talk of equity.
    Toronto, as with any city, benefits from new ideas, new capital, new entrepreneurship, and heterogeneity of fresh resident experiences. In that sense, a new Canadian was previously vetted by the federal government as being suitable to immigrate to Canada.
    It’s not like we’re talking about “Yankeebacks” sneaking over a porous border and illegally taking away good paying Canadian jobs.

  • http://undefined Lolo H

    I personally don’t believe that Ford’s statement is anti-immigrant, racist or “common man”-like. I think its a realist’s point of view, and I’ll explain why.
    I am from an immigrant family myself, and many immigrants and Torontonians seem to share my concern that:
    a) The city’s infrastructure cannot support an influx of new residents; how many of you have driven within Toronto or taken the TTC recently? How many of you are frustrated by the lack of bike lanes in this city?
    b) There are not enough jobs for the people that already reside in Toronto, let alone new immigrants. How many of us have heard of or know someone who is overqualified for the job they currently hold here? How many people are unemployed and looking for work? How many people are employed in low paying benefit-less jobs where one can barely afford rent?
    c) Where are these new citizens supposed to live, when apartment and real estate prices are already too expensive, inflated, and competitive for the current population to handle? I may be generalizing, but how many of us know of students who cannot find work, long time residents and immigrants who cannot find jobs despite degrees?If anyone reading this has ever rented an apartment in this city, how can you argue with the fact that rent is ridiculously inflated, as are real estate figures, because of the supply and demand? How can people justify paying such a high percentage of their incomes on rent?
    Understandably, some people are upset thinking that this is a racist or anti-immigrant point of view. It isn’t any of these. It is what many people feel is a realistic view of Toronto today, and why Ford is so popular despite being criticized for this point of view. Yes, Toronto and Canada are known for encouraging immigration through the years, but I think there is a limit to the sheer number of people that this city can sustain. Just take a ride on the TTC, and time of day, or try to drive anywhere within city limits. How can we justify encouraging new immigrants when we don’t have to infrastructure to support such a growing population? Look at the dramatic increase in Toronto’s population within the last 15 years.
    I don’t believe Ford is being anti-immigrant or racist. Many people are thinking that it’s time Toronto looks after its self. When we can support new citizens , without issues of infrastructure and quality of life, nobody should argue against immigration. But as Ford says, it’s time to look after Toronto first, and make sure we are a place fit for prosperity for everyone.

  • http://bit.ly/accozzaglia accozzaglia

    I’ll try for brevity. It’ll be a total tl;dr failure:
    a) Toronto as a city is better poised than most cities of its size in North America to absorb new residents. Consider that housing is only one part of the pie. Consider that transportation is only one part of the pie. Consider that globalized business conditions now direct where urban jobs go: tertiary (service) and quaternary (data) sectors.
    We are unlike our American cities, because we are tied down by provincial authority, which in turn is tied down by federal authority. It’s core to this nation and has been since the start.
    To put in the filling for all those pie pieces, you must start at the top. Our difference between today and when the current federal government took over is we have filed the municipal and regional reports on planning, on plans of action, on projections for the next 25 years, 50 years, even longer.
    Our federal government is unambiguous about its animus towards its major metro centres. Metro centres are the national economic engines. More than four out of five Canadian residents are in an urban area now. The federal government, with help from some provincial governments, has starved the metro centres of the funding (pie filling) we need. Economically, ignoring metro centres and their needs is schizophrenic policy.
    People will immigrate to nations whose own birth rates cannot prop up continued growth. These nations adopt immigration policy to make up for that (Japan notably excepted, and at considerable peril to its long-term economy). People globally migrate to the cities, and people from smaller cities migrate to the bigger cities. This is an inertia far beyond Toronto’s control, Ontario’s control, and to some extent, Canada’s control.
    As to whether Toronto can “sustain” growth, it can. As to whether this refrain is new, it isn’t. Growth isn’t easy, but Toronto, relative to many cities, is remarkably low-density with space for spare. Things will have to change along the way to fit new housing and related infrastructure. If in doubt, visit Barcelona, Hong Kong, Berlin, Tokyo, and London. They’re much denser, and they are still managing to accommodate more people.
    We are ready to execute our plans of action, but we are beholden to purse strings beyond our reach. Now our plans, years in the making and with millions spent, are about to be tossed out in a populist groundswell. Our electorate is about to pull the rug and try shake it “clean.” With everything undone, buyer’s remorse will set in as the electorate learn that you can’t just throw everything away and re-write the play book. Certainly not in four short years.
    It will be ugly — much uglier than our transportation problems (which really pale to Montréal, to Vegas, and to L.A.). We are better poised than most to fix transportation, but quick fixes will fail us, because they’re tactical approaches, not strategic ones. Transit City is strategic. Metrolinx is functioning strategically. But best laid plans won’t happen without the funding. For that, you have to go to Ottawa.
    b) There are not enough jobs anywhere. Further, there are not enough high-paying jobs anywhere. In a tertiary (service) economy, the wages will be lower than the secondary (manufacturing) economy we no longer have or the primary (resources) economy on which Canada was founded. Primary and secondary are over and done with. We have a global market to thank for that. We cannot undo it.
    There will always be unemployment — here and elsewhere. Overqualified people are driving taxis, selling street meat, running corner groceries, delivering packages, and operating copy shops near campuses. We already know that physicians driving for Beck, Diamond, or Co-op can’t practise here because of federal CIC bureaucracy that has persistently stonewalled on the updates that would harmonize credential verification with a globalized reality. Again, this is a federal matter by which we as a city are burdened and powerless.
    Address the problem at the federal level. We haven’t done that. We ought to.
    c) We live on a capitalist continent. Market forces, so long as we operate in a capitalist civilization, cannot be done away with.
    We have a housing shortage in that we expanded too far and too sparsely. We pay for this developer mistake of the past by jammed roads with people who must rely on a car to go to work. There is no simple solution to enable someone in Rexdale or upper Islington to rapidly get to Guildwood or Agincourt. Sometimes, one has to live in a suburb to work at a job in another suburb. This is a function of our low-density growth of the past: it was short term gain for long-term pain.
    There is no quick fix. There is, however, a planned approach of clustering services and jobs in parts of the city like North York Centre, so that Toronto has more than one “core.” It was proposed by Paul Bedford, Toronto’s retired chief planner responsible for the first post-amalgamation city plan. His approach will help, but it won’t entirely undo the error of building outward like the post-WWII Americans did. The Don Mills model doesn’t work without clogging road infrastructure. You can’t build roads to build out of it.
    Housing is expensive. Toronto’s most affordable housing is pushed out — not to the newest suburbs, but to those developed a generation or two ago. Often these are places coincide where public transit is woefully under-served. Once transportation improves, property values go up adjacent to those corridors, and the most affordable housing must go elsewhere — often to the most under-served areas of the city. Rinse and repeat.
    New condo development can only support a market able to buy into it. Right now, the market is supporting it. Once the market retreats, developers will change their tune in order to turn a profit. They also have to operate within city planning guidelines. Our current plan calls for increased, less sparse housing. Unfortunately to some, that means a functional end to the single-detached. Those days are over.

    Now, as for Rob, he is racist — flat-out racist. He does have a hate-on for homos. Now, he’s intoning that growth is a function of “new” Canadians (code for naturalized immigrant). He’s only partly correct: growth is coming from “old” Canadians, too — migrating from smaller towns. Rob also doesn’t acknowledge the straightforward forces (outlined above) shaping immigration. His ignorance will be his partial undoing.
    For now, Toronto’s electorate is brushing those fatal character flaws aside because of impulsive, feel-good voting. It’s like buying candy at the checkout aisle when it wasn’t on your shopping list. Rob Ford is that candy.
    And, oh: I’m a dyed in the wool Torontonian by choice. I’m also an immigrant, not yet “new” Canadian. Rob might look at me and think, “Oh, but see, she’s not a visible minority. And she works hard, too. She’s OK.” But for him to say that, he’s not OK. For him to equivocate at all on who deserves to belong in Toronto is not OK.
    Obviously, Lolo, that means I cannot vote in this election. And what a bummer that is. But because I’m new, I’ll probably be taking your job and crowding out your housing by the time the 2014 elections arrive.
    You might as well join Rob and shut me out of town, too.

  • http://undefined spacejack

    Okay it was a bad example (I shouldn’t write comments while distracted.) But the main point was the poll wording seemed vague and unqualified. Using the results to identify the “type of people” that are going to put Ford in power was idiotic IMHO, and is just another example of Ford criticism blowing back on the critics.
    Canada in general of course needs immigrants. Our birth rate is well below replacement, and people are the one resource we lack.

  • http://paul.kishimoto.name Paul Kishimoto

    The shorter reply is that we could find an identical argument being made five, 15 or 50 years ago.
    I hope you can appreciate that one’s perspective on immigration can change easily. If you’re out in the cold, open doors are wonderful things. Once you’re indoors, they only seem to let in drafts and undesirables. Some generations become myopic more quickly than others, but it is nearly inevitable.
    If you’d included or referenced some data to suggest that, e.g., immigration is a significant contributor to the level of unemployment in the city, you might have a point. As vague allegations, your points are as useless as they are timeless.