Urban Planner: May 5, 2009

Torontoist

1 Comment

news

Urban Planner: May 5, 2009

Urban Planner is Torontoist’s daily guide to what’s on in Toronto, published every morning. If you have an event you’d like considered, email all of its details—as well as images, if you’ve got any—to events@torontoist.com.


POLITICS: Toronto City Hall is hosting a town hall meeting tonight about the Beautifulcity.ca initiative, which would implement stricter billboard bylaws, and fees. The proposal, which will be voted on in a few weeks’ time, will not only give a 53% increase to the current annual municipal funding for artists and art institutions, but will also provide, annually, three hundred thousand dollars for each of the thirteen identified “priority neighbourhoods” and one hundred thousand dollars for each of the city’s forty-four wards, as well as the ability to hire “seventeen dedicated staff to enforce the new billboard bylaw, create a public inventory, direct removals, and collect fines,” according to organizer Devon Ostrom. For more information on how to get involved, check out the Facebook event, and keep your eyes on Torontoist this week for further coverage. Toronto City Hall (100 Queen Street West, Council Chambers), 6:30–9 p.m., FREE.
WORDS: Joseph Heath, the author of The Efficient Society and co-author of The Rebel Sell, celebrates the launch of his latest effort tonight at the Gladstone. Filthy Lucre: Economics For People Who Hate Capitalism is an exploration of growing political skepticism, taking on both left- and right-wing economic fallacies, and Heath will appear in conversation with Toronto Star business columnist David Olive. Part of Pages’ This Is Not A Reading Series. Gladstone Hotel Ballroom (1214 Queen Street West), 7 p.m., $5 (FREE with book purchase).
BIKES: Today at City Hall, the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee will vote on the Jarvis Street redesign that we told you about the early stages of last March. Transportation Services will be presenting its recommended design, which is mostly pedestrian-oriented and does not include any bike lanes. Ward 27 Councillor Kyle Rae will then present his preferred design, one which includes bike lanes, followed by a deputation by Yvonne Bambrick on behalf of the Toronto Cyclists Union. Toronto City Hall (100 Queen Street West, Committee Room 1), 1:30 p.m. sharp, FREE.
FILM: Join Grown Up Digital author Don Tapscott and Mayor David Miller this evening for a free movie screening at Ryerson University. Us Now is a UK documentary that explores the power of social networking capabilities, and what it could mean in terms of opportunities for the government. Following the movie, there will be a panel discussion featuring five thinkers who will discuss the importance of modern technologies in community engagement. Co-presented by Volunteer Toronto. Ryerson University Library Building, LB72 Auditorium (350 Victoria Street), 5:30 p.m., FREE.
THEATRE: The Benjamin Britten adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream opens tonight at the Four Seasons Centre. Part of the Canadian Opera Company‘s current season, Dream is directed by Neil Armfield, and stars Lawrence Zazzo, Laura Claycomb, Wolfgang Holzmair, and Giselle Allen, with appearances from the (adorable) Canadian Children’s Opera Company. A Midsummer Night’s Dream runs until May 23, and you can buy tickets here. Four Seasons Centre (145 Queen Street West), 7:30 p.m., $60–$290.

CORRECTION: MAY 5, 2009 Two mistakes from and one update to the lead listing, about the Beautifulcity.ca initiative. First, while the event is hosted at City Hall, it is not hosted by Toronto City Council (as this article originally mistakenly said) but is instead an “alliance” between several dozen local organizations. Second, the initiative, if approved, would create not just “upwards of four hundred thousand dollars annually to help fund accessible youth arts programming and public realm improvement,” as this article originally said, but significantly more than that—three hundred thousand dollars for each of the identified “thirteen priority neighbourhoods” and one hundred thousand dollars for each of the city’s forty-four wards, as well as the ability to hire “seventeen dedicated staff to enforce the new billboard bylaw, create a public inventory, direct removals, and collect fines,” according to organizer Devon Ostrom. And third, tonight’s meeting has been moved from Committee Room 2 to Council Chambers.

Comments